The Hispanic Identity of Filipinos: A Short History

This is a student guest blog post in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and Filipino American Heritage month.

Author: Mark Francis Mabalatan ’21, Management and Political Science Major, 3+2 Master of Public Administration Program

333 years is quite a long time. For Filipinos, the 333 years the Philippines were subjugated to Spanish colonization were rife with conflict, both militarily and in identity. Like several other civilizations that first met Spanish conquistadors at their shores in the 15th and 16th centuries, the Philippines had unique, highly structured societies prior to European contact. These conflicts were exemplified by the story of The Battle of Mactan, where Ferdinand Magellan (Guillermo 261) was famously defeated by native datu (ruler) Lapu-Lapu (Guillermo 240), in my own ancestral province of Cebu (Guillermo 100). While the Battle of Mactan is a legend every Filipino is familiar with, the subsequent centuries gave way to a tidal wave of Spanish settlement, economic practices, and cultural rifts.

The first Spaniards in Cebu were 2,100 settler-soldiers from New Spain (Mexico), and the Philippines was administered as a Viceroyalty of New Spain until the end of Spanish rule in 1898. In that time, Spanish settlers changed almost every aspect of life on the islands. They changed our names. They changed our languages. They changed our religions. The effects of Spanish colonization were wide-ranging and emphatic, remaining to this day. So, is the Philippines a Hispanic country? Quite clearly, yes. But in the contemporary Hispanic consciousness, it is not understood as such – as if there was something that erased those 333 years of history.

As it turns out, the subsequent 48 years of American colonization is quite the eraser. The United States undertook an expedited process of undoing the Hispanization of the Philippines to make way for its Americanization of the islands. Despite this, the fact remains that the cultural DNA of the Philippines is Hispanic, making many aspects of the Filipino experience Hispanic and the experience itself Hispanic. The father of modern Philippines, José Rizal, wrote all his foundational works in Spanish. We tell time in Spanish. 80% of Filipinos are Catholic. The holiday known in the Philippines as Undas is a carbon copy of Dia de Muertos in Mexico and other Latino countries. Cebuano, also known as Bisaya and the native language of my family, contains thousands of Spanish words. However, the beauty of our culture is not derived from our colonization, but how we rose out of it. Distinctly Filipino music and dance styles such as Cariñosa, featuring dancers in brightly colored, flowing dresses called Maria Claras, bears a striking resemblance to jarabe tapatío of Mexico. Traditional Hispanic family values, including respect for elders, close family ties, and pride of the home country, are powerfully evident in many Filipino families.

Every year, October 1st to 15th serves as a metaphor for Hispanic identity of Filipinos. During this time span, there is a two-week eclipse of Hispanic Heritage Month, which lasts from September 15th to October 15th, and Filipino-American Heritage Month, which lasts the entire month of October— Hispanic, but not completely. History defines the present and the future, an axiom especially significant to ethnic groups. So what does Filipino history say about the country’s Hispanic identity? As Filipino-American sociologist Anthony Christian Ocampo, author of The Latinos of Asia: How Filipinos Break the Rule of Race, plainly states, “You can’t just forget the three-and-a-half century Spanish influence in the Philippines.”

See below for to learn more about the Hispanic identity of the Philippines, Filipinos, and Filipino-Americans:

Books

Bulosan, Carlos. America Is in the Heart: A Personal History. Vol. 2014 edition, University of Washington Press, 2014. EBSCOhost, https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=sso&db=e700xna&AN=1052322&site=ehost-live

Francia, Luis. A History of the Philippines: From Indios Bravos to Filipinos. Overlook Press, 2014. https://setonhall.on.worldcat.org/oclc/878963486 Request through ILL or Suggest for Purchase!

Guillermo, Artemio R. Historical Dictionary of the Philippines. Vol. 3rd ed, Scarecrow Press, 2012. EBSCOhost, https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=sso&db=e089mna&AN=413501&site=ehost-live&custid=s8475574&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_100

Ocampo, Anthony Christian. The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race. Stanford University Press, 2016. EBSCOhost, https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=sso&db=e000bna&AN=1115879&site=ehost-live

Rizal, José. El Filibusterismo: Continuacion Del Noli Me Tangere. Boekdrukkerij F. Meyer-Van Loo, 1896. Project Gutenberg, http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30903

Rizal José. Noli Me Tangere. Project Gutenberg, http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/20228

Articles

Videos

THE 14TH ANNUAL JIM AND JUDY O’BRIEN CAPITAL MARKETS COLLOQUIUM

On February 12, 2020, approximately 300 students, faculty and guests attended the 14th Annual Jim and Judy O’Brien Capital Markets Colloquium, which was held at the Walsh Library. The colloquium, co-sponsored by the University Libraries and the Stillman School of Business, was held for the first time at the library, which proved to be an excellent location for the day’s events.

15 concurrent workshops ran from 9:30 a.m.to 6:15 p.m. Some highlights of the day’s events included an opportunity to apprentice with a representative from Napier Park, a credit platform that has 14 billion dollars in assets; a workshop on the growing sector of e-sports; and the dress rehearsal of the 3-time champion CFA Team ((note Seton Hall has won the Chartered Financial Analyst Research Challenge 3 times and placed 11 times).

Jim O’Brien ’82 and Ned May delivered the keynote address.  Jim O’Brien is the Senior Managing Partner of Napier ParkGlobal Capital and the recipient of the 2013 Many Are One Humanitarian Award from Seton Hall.

For more information on this event, please contact Chelsea Barrett, Business Librarian, at 973-275-2035.

 

 

Hold feature: books can be pulled for you at the Libraries.

The Seton Hall University Libraries are now offering an online retrieval and hold service. With this service, patrons can request a book, CD, or DVD, and pick it up from the circulation desk of the Walsh, Seminary, or Law Library.

The blue “place a hold” button is located on the right-hand side of book records in our catalog.  When users click on this button, they are prompted to log in using their SHU credentials, and then to choose where they wish to pick up the item.  The item will be retrieved by library staff and held at the designated circulation desk for pickup.  Items will be available 12 hours after the request is made.

To request a book from the Law Library, please use this form:

Law Library Book Request form

http://library.shu.edu/book-request-form .

We trust that this service represents another step forward in enhancing the accessibility of the University Libraries’ resources, and we look forward to serving you.

Unlimited access to SciFinder for SHU

SHU Libraries are delighted to announce that CAS has granted us unlimited access to SciFinder, a major research tool for chemistry and related sciences. No more not being able to log on because the available “seats” are occupied!  In addition, SciFinder now integrates well with ChemBioDraw, to which SHU Libraries also provides access.

If you are a chemist or taking chemistry courses, sign up for a web-based SciFinder account.  You can find the instructions for accessing SciFinder and ChembioDraw on the chemistry research guide.

Archives closes 2 weeks in August for work behind the scenes

During the weeks of August 4-8 and 18-22, 2014 the Archives, Walsh Library, will be closed to researchers so that we can accomplish some work in the vault that we cannot do when school is in full session in the Fall and Spring semesters. This work will help us to improve our service. We appreciate your understanding and apologize for any inconvenience.

SciFinder Training Sessions – with ICE CREAM!

Are you a science major, graduate student or faculty member?   If so, you already use (or should be using) SciFinder – so come and learn all about it, from the basics to advanced techniques.

This Friday – April 4th 2014, McNulty Amphitheater (Room 101)

Please join us for one or more of these sessions

  1. 2:00 – 3:00  SciFinder Fundamentals and Reference Searching
  2. 3:10 – 3:40  Advanced SciFinder Structure Searching
  3. 3:50 – 4:30  Advanced SciFinder Reaction Searching and the SciPlanner

Presented by Dan Reasoner & John Kratunis of Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS); a division of the American Chemical Service (ACS)

Light refreshments included (and yes, there really will be ICE CREAM!)

BOOK EXCHANGE and NEW BOOK shelves

Walsh Library is pleased to once again offer freely available books for your reading pleasure, just in time for the holiday season.  Come and help yourself to a book and/or leave a book for others to take.  The “BOOK EXCHANGE” shelves are located on the 2nd floor of Walsh Library, on the wall next to the Silent Study Room.  These books do not need to be checked out.

Further along the same wall you will find our relocated “NEW BOOK” area.  These books may be checked out at the circulation desk.

Mobile access to Nature Journals

You can now connect to Nature Journals through your mobile device; see Nature Publishing Group’s announcement.

You can also access Nature Journals through the library database page or directly at Nature Publishing Group (you will be prompted to log in withe your Pirate Net credentials if you are off campus). This is your gateway to the content and services produced by the Nature Publishing Group, including the journal Nature and its companion journals in specialized subject areas, blogs, conference reports, podcasts, job postings and other supplemental content.