Fall Break Library Hours

#SHU_Libraries will be open during Fall Break at these times:

Monday,  October 14th      8a – 10p | After Hours Study Space      10p-8a
Tuesday,  October 14th      8a – 10p | After Hours Study Space      10p-8a

Regular hours resume Wednesday, October 16th, 8a – 2a.


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Walsh Gallery presents “New World Water”

Artists Exhibit Under the Thematic Umbrella of Water
NEW WORLD WATER
November 4 – December 13, 2019

Opening Reception: Thursday, November 7th (5pm to 9pm)

The Walsh Gallery is pleased to present New World Water, a group exhibition which examines humanity’s relationship with water through the lens of contemporary art. The artists in the exhibition address themes such as: climate change, water contamination, immigration, diaspora, plastic pollution, community water management, leisure, and hygiene.

Participating artists include Keren Anavy, Dotty Attie, Aileen Bassis, Adam Brent, Nancy Cohen, Nancy Crasco, Sally Gall, Tai Hwa Goh, Ellie Irons, Anne Percoco, Nyugen Smith, Allan Wexler, and Woolpunk. The exhibition will also feature art and artifacts from the university’s collections.  A public art project, “Lawn (Re)disturbance Laboratory” by artists Anne Percoco and Ellie Irons, is currently on view on the campus grounds.  The exhibition is curated by Samantha Becker, a graduate student in the Museum Professions Program at Seton Hall University.

Image: Adam Brent “Intake” 3D printed PLA plastic, Acrylic Paint, Wooden Step Stool, 2019

Becker’s goal in curating a show on this theme is to present a diverse, yet important, series of issues surrounding water – a resource we often take for granted.  Notes Becker, “When a social issue is presented in our society, numbers on a television screen or in a newspaper do not evoke the same empathy as a personal connection to the issue.  This show will make the many issues surrounding this precious resource evident in an experiential manner.”  The curator also worked with students and faculty from the University Libraries, Environmental Studies and the School of Diplomacy to understand the issues from numerous angles. One of the components of the collaboration with the University Libraries and the School of Diplomacy is a Water Data Visualization Project, which will be on view in the Walsh Gallery Display Windows.

The Walsh Gallery is open 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday—Friday.

Upcoming Event: Seton Hall University Libraries Speaker’s Series

Seton Hall University Libraries Speaker’s Series
 “Critical Issues in Information and Education”

PRESENTS

 The Values That (Formerly?) Shaped Journalism
and the Fallout for Schools

with guest speakers

Dr. Matthew Pressman
(Seton Hall’s College of Communication & The Arts)Photo of Matthew Pressmanand

Dr. David Aderhold
(President, NJ Network of Superintendents)Photo of David Aderhold

Wednesday, October 9th @ 12:30 pm – 1:30pm
2nd Floor Common Area, Walsh Library
ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

RSVP to Tiffany Burns tiffany.burns1@shu.edu

View the Event Flyer [link ]


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Mind FULL or Mindful? Join us for a Stress Relief for Research Workshop

Come learn from student stress-relief coach Priya Patel, the library, and CAPS about the benefits of incorporating mindfulness into your study and research practice.

mindfulness pictureDate: Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: 2nd Floor Library, Dean’s Conference Room

Please RSVP as we only have 20 seats available.

To RSVP https://shu.libcal.com/event/5778277

 

TLTR Copyright Committee presents “Why Worry About Copyright?” with guest Kevin Smith

Why Worry About Copyright?  
By Lysa Martinelli

Kevin Smith The Teaching, Learning and Technology Roundtable will host the presentation: “Why Worry About Copyright? A Systematic Approach to Thinking About Any Copyright Issue”. Guest speaker Kevin Smith will discuss Fair Use and the grey areas as well as providing guidance to students and the faculty that advise them on the use of published materials in dissertations and theses.
When:  Friday, September 27, 2019 from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. (lunch will be prior to the presentation at 12:00 p.m.)
Where: Walsh Library – Ground floor, Beck Rooms.
Registration Required (free): https://is.gd/p61YzaThis free event is sponsored by the Teaching, Learning & Technology Roundtable (TLTR) Copyright Committee. The TLTR is a consortium of faculty, administration and students that meets in action teams to discuss institutional issues related to teaching, learning, and technology.

Guest speaker Kevin Smith became the Dean of Libraries and Courtesy Professor of Law at the University of Kansas in May 2016, after 10 years as Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communications at the Duke University Libraries. As both a librarian and a lawyer specializing in intellectual property issues, Smith’s role at Duke was to advise faculty, staff, and students about the impact of copyright, licensing, and the changing nature of scholarly publishing in higher education. Prior to that, Smith was director of the Pilgrim Library at Defiance College in Ohio, where he also taught constitutional law. His teaching experience is various, having taught courses in theology, law, and library science; he currently teaches Copyright Law in a Digital Age for the University of Kansas Law School.

Smith is the author of numerous articles on the impact of copyright law and the internet on scholarly research as well as libraries’ role in the academy. He has been a highly regarded blogger on these issues for many years, and in 2013 published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers with the Association of College and Research Libraries. His book on Coaching Copyright, with Erin Ellis, was released by the American Library Association in the spring of 2019. Smith holds a BA from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., an MA from Yale Divinity School, an MLS from Kent State University, and a JD from Capital University. He did doctoral work in theology and literature at the University of Chicago. Smith has been admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina.

Follow Kevin Smith on Twitter https://twitter.com/kulibdean


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Faculty Resources For Streaming Media

#SHU_Libraries offer several ways to stream film and video. The Seton Hall community can steam video using Academic Video Online. Academic Video Online provides a comprehensive video collection, delivering more than 66,000 titles spanning the widest range of subject areas including anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more.

The Library offers access to over 25,000 commercial films in digital format through Digital Campus. These films may be viewed in the classroom and must be ordered by a faculty member.

Faculty members can also request films for the SHU community through Kanopy. Kanopy streams more than 26,000 films from the Criterion Collection, Great Courses, PBS, and hundreds of other producers. The films range from documentaries, indie and foreign films to classics and blockbuster movies. To start exploring our film and video collections please visit Accessing Films at SHU https://library.shu.edu/films/home.

Streaming Platforms

Please Contact Prof. Gerry Shea for further information.


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Italian Studies Institute Presents the Italian Studies Award Ceremony

The Charles and Joan Alberto Italian Studies Institute is pleased to present THE ITALIAN STUDIES AWARD CEREMONY

Honoring the 2019 Scholarship Awards Winners and Benefactors
and
A Poetry Reading
by  Maria Mazziotti Gillan (Poet) and Carla Francellini (Translator)

Maria Mazziotti Gillan
Maria Mazziotti Gillan

Maria Mazziotti Gillan is the winner of the 2014 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature from AWP, the 2011 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award from Poets & Writers, and the 2008 American Book Award for her book All That Lies Between Us. She is the Founder/Executive Director of the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College, editor of the Paterson Literary Review, and director of the creative writing program/professor of English at Binghamton University-SUNY.

Tuesday, September 24, 2019 @ 6:00 PM
Theatre-in-the-Round (University Center)
Co-sponsored by Seton Hall University Libraries

RSVP: Barbara Ritchie — 973-275-2967 | barbara.ritchie@shu.edu


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‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years

‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 | By Matthew Minor

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Under the dome of Walsh Library hangs a quote from St. John Paul: “Faith and reason are the two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth.” For 25 years, Walsh Library has stood as the cornerstone of Seton Hall’s pursuit of reason within our Catholic values.In 1990, the University’s leadership noted the need for a new library. The Very Reverend Thomas Peterson, O.P., former university chancellor, said, “Seton Hall needs a new library and she needs it now. It must be her star, the jewel of her campus.”Four years later, Walsh Library opened. In the April 28, 1994 edition of the University’s student-run newspaper, The Setonian, then-Dean of Libraries Robert jones called the library dome “‘the outstanding architectural feature of the building.’ [Jones] said the dome is the library’s crowning feature and compared it to the dome of the Library of Congress.”

 

A flyer from University Day 1994
A flyer from University Day 1994

In 25 years, the library has seen much change. Richard Stern, acting dean of University Libraries from 2002-2004, said, “a jewel never changes. But as humans learn, they change the buildings they inhabit to suit their needs.” And so Walsh Library has changed from a place of quiet study to a place of lively academic discussion and socialization. In 2012, Dunkin’ opened on the library’s second floor. In March 2019, an after-hours study space opened for students’ use 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Daniela Gloor, BA ’14/MPA ’15, and her classmates in the University Honors took advantage of the library to blend their studies with this “lively academic discussion and socialization.” Walsh Library “was a place where you bonded with one another while studying, completing assignments, or writing your papers,” Gloor said. “My Honors Program classmates and I anxiously sought to study in the Library Rotunda when it was available, which has a picture-perfect view of campus and is one of the most unique places at Seton Hall. While we likely cannot remember all the works we read and studied, I can certainly recall the environment of the library, many of the memories made there, and the sleepless nights we spent working toward graduation.”

Seton Hall’s community continues to seek out the Library’s resources. In 2019, 66,000 items were borrowed, loaned and/or used, more than 44,000 books were circulated, 20,000 interlibrary loan transactions were fulfilled for books and articles and keys for the group study rooms were used more than 13,000 times.

A model of Walsh Library
A model of Walsh library

Walsh Library has been a witness to the digital revolution that redefined research and study. Former Acting Dean Stern said the library “has grown from an institution where researchers came to find materials to an institution where researchers increasingly conduct all stages of their research in the digital sphere.”

Elizabeth Leonard, Assistant Dean for Information Technologies and Collection Services, said, “When Walsh Library opened in 1994, library technology, like all technology, was in its infancy…we did (yes, really) hand stamp all books going out on loan to patrons.” When the library opened, The Setonian wrote study rooms were “equipped with windows and outlets [which] are designed so students can bring their own computers and plug them into the University system.” Now, wireless laptops and a plethora of new Macs and PCs allow students to study wherever they like.

25 years later, technology touches almost every aspect of the library. In 2019 alone, roughly 427,000 full-text articles were downloaded, users viewed subject guides more than 64,000 times, the library website received 400,000 views and 1.4 million theses and dissertations were downloaded from the library’s collection. The library’s institutional repository, an online database comprising scholarly pieces such as dissertations and theses written by Seton Hall students and faculty, surpassed three million downloads in June 2019. Thanks to technology, Leonard said the library’s “resources are available to authorized users anywhere in the world, whenever they need them. We digitize lectures, books and other materials for virtual use.”

Walsh Library is looking toward the next 25 years of service to the University community. Leonard said, “We are looking forward by preserving born digital materials in a repository that will ensure they are accessible to future generations of librarians and researchers.”

View the library’s online exhibit Walsh Libraries: 25 Years of Learning, here.

Walsh Gallery Provides Learning Opportunities for Museum Professions Students

Exterior of the Walsh Library.

 

One of the many gems of Seton Hall University is the Walsh Gallery, located on the first floor of the Walsh Library. For students in the M.A. in Museum Professions program, a graduate program within the College of Communication and the Arts, this gallery serves as an exhibition space, a classroom, and – recently, a space where students can put their learned skills to the test. This past Spring semester students in two courses, Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums and Object Care, used the Walsh Gallery to put theory in practice.

The Walsh Gallery recently held an exhibit titled “Strange Attractors“, which explored how the intersection of art and science have become increasingly connected. The exhibit encouraged visitors to consider ways in which an art-science alliance might contribute to the larger cultural discourse with an emphasis on how visual art can generate insight into subjects generally understood through other means. Students in the Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums course were invited to attend an interdisciplinary panel discussion exploring the alliance between art and science. During the discussion, the artists and scientists on the panel debated topics including artistic value and bioethics, art’s ability to visualize scientific issues such as ocean pollution and disease and the correlation between science, religion and poetics.

Jennifer Hochuli, a current student on the education track, attended the panel discussion and felt this discussion strengthened her understanding of how legal and ethical issues play a role in museum exhibits.

“During our Legal and Ethical course, we talked about how the mix of science and art in museums can create controversies, which often lead to censorship” she shared. “These panelists presented an argument as to how art and science can benefit from each another. Museum professionals need to recognize these benefits and be prepared to use these arguments in defending a controversial curatorial choice.”

Following the Strange Attractors exhibit and panel discussion, students in the Object Care course took part in both the deinstallation and the installation processes in the gallery. Assisting with deinstallation, students worked with the gallery professionals to safely remove artwork, practicing the object handling techniques discussed in class. Nicholas Lambing, a student on the registration track, helped several artists remove their artwork from the walls.

“We discussed all the different techniques of how-to best handle artwork in class,” Lambing shared, “but getting an opportunity to actually work with an artist and practice this techniques was incredibly beneficial. As a future collections manager, having these practical skills will help me better succeed in the field.” Rachel Receuro, another museum registration student in the Object Care course, assisted with the installation process and appreciated the chance to gain hands-on experience in tasks she will be responsible for as a future museum professional.

I helped catalogue the art as it was delivered to the gallery, decided where the works were going to be hung in the show, placed labels, and assisted with lighting,” Receuro shared. “We discussed this process in Object Care, but it is invaluable to have the chance to actually experience and apply all the things we learn and discuss in class.

The course Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums explores current legal and ethical issues in museums such as mission, vision and values, professional codes of ethics, roles and responsibilities of staff and boards, representation, decolonization and censorship. The Object Care course introduces students to issues associated with care, preservation, conservation, history and technique for objects in a wide variety of media including works on paper, paintings, sculptures, textiles, photographs, frames and ethnographic objects.

The Walsh Gallery hosts five shows a year. Students in the exhibition development track use the gallery as the exhibition space for the Producing an Exhibition course. As part of that experience, students curate an exhibition from conception to deinstallation. The previous two student-curated exhibits presented artistic expression of social injustices and the multiple meanings of the color red.

The M.A. in Museum Professions is designed for individuals interested in pursuing careers in museums or related cultural institutions. Students in the program select from one of four professional tracks, including Museum Education, Museum Registration, Museum Management, or Exhibition Development.

The College currently offers three Master’s-level programs, including Museum ProfessionsCommunication, and Public Relations. In addition, four dual-degree options, including three accelerated B.A./M.A. programs and a dual M.A. degree with the School of Diplomacy and International Relations are offered.

For more information about Graduate Studies within the College of Communication and the Arts, please contact Ryan Hudes, Ph.D.