Seton Hall University Libraries Celebrate Open Education Week 2021

Open Education Week will take place this year from Monday, March 1st — Friday, March 5th. Started in 2012, Open Education Week is an opportunity to share and learn about the latest achievements in open education. Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with intellectual property licenses that facilitate the free use, adaptation and distribution of resources” (UNESCO, 2019).

To coincide with Open Education Week, University Libraries is sponsoring several events:

1. Wednesday, March 3rd from 12:30pm – 1:30pm the Center for Faculty Development is presenting an online workshop — Reducing Book Costs for Students with Open Educational Resources — co-sponsored with Seton Hall University Libraries. At this workshop, Seton Hall librarians will explain the benefits of OER, demonstrate how library resources can help bring down the cost of textbooks, and provide faculty with practical tools and resources for using open textbooks in their courses. To join the workshop click here.

2. Thursday, March 4th from 3:00pm – 4:00pm join us for a roundtable discussion on the benefits and challenges of integrating open educational resources, open textbooks and/or library e-resources in your courses. If you have had experience with open materials or are interested in learning more about them, we would love to hear from you. This event is open to faculty, administrators and students – come and be heard! To join the discussion on Teams click here.

3. Friday, March 5th @ 10:30 TLTC is hostinga virtual session Leveraging Open Educational Resources. Explore the wide range of Open Educational Resources (OER) that reside in the public domain and are free to use for teaching and learning. Register here.

4. Friday, March 5th from 10:00am-12pm, then 1:00pm-3:00pm Seton Hall Librarians will provide virtual office hours for anyone who has questions about OER. Feel free to meet with:

Prof. Gerry Shea (Communication Librarian)
10:00am-12pm Join on Teams

Prof. Kyle Downey (Nursing/Heath Science Librarian)
1:00pm-3:00pm Join on Teams

Prof. Lisa Rose-Wiles (Science Librarian)
10:00am-12pm Join on Teams
1:00pm-3:00pm Join on Teams


Want to learn more about OER?
Reach out to Prof. Gerry Shea | Explore our OER Research Guide here

Seton Hall University Libraries Joins HathiTrust

Seton Hall University Libraries has become the newest member of HathiTrust (www.hathitrust.org), a global collaborative of research and academic libraries working towards its mission to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future.

Today, HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.

HathiTrust members steward this collection under the aims of scholarly, not corporate, interests. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community. This offers an unprecedented opportunity to steward the cultural record through increasingly interdependent work that develops capacity and sparks innovation.

Authorized Seton Hall University constituents can access Hathi Trust with their PirateNet credentials here.

For more information, see 2021 HathiTrust At-a-Glance [pdf]

February Speaker’s Series Event

#SHU_Libraries is pleased to announce the next event in our Speaker’s Series: Critical Issues in Information and Education—

“Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools.” 

***View a recording of the event here***

When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 (4:00-5:15pm)

About Our Speakers: 

Image of Elaina Norlin

Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). In her role, Ms. Norlin develops and expands ASERL’s Professional Development programming, including the development of new activities to advance ASERL’s goals for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). “As the ASERL Professional Development/DEI Coordinator, I’m passionate about transforming workplace organizations from dysfunctional to a place everyone feels valued, respected and honored for their unique and special contributions to the organization.”

For ten years, Ms. Norlin served as Executive Director of the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, overseeing significant programmatic growth and community outreach activities. She previously worked for OCLC, the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the University of Arizona.

In addition, Ms. Norlin works closely with leaders and educators to develop, implement, and assess programs that support diversity, equity, and inclusion, employee engagement, institutional growth, and workplace culture.

Ms. Norlin earned her Bachelor of Arts in Communications (Advertising) from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, her Master of Library and Information Science is also from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  

Image of John Kummings

J. Kenyon Kummings is the Superintendent for Wildwood Public Schools (WPS). Mr. Kummings has served as the Superintendent for WPS since 2014. Prior to assuming that role he was the elementary school principal for seven years. WPS has a high percentage of economically disadvantaged students and is racially and ethnically diverse. The district is unique in that it continuously has one of the highest percentages of students living in poverty in the state of New Jersey (50%). WPS is the only P-12 Urban district in Cape May County and has been fine tuned to meet the needs of its students given that its demographic consists of large populations of special education students (24%), and English Language Learners (35% Pre-K to 8thGrade).

Mr. Kummings has testified several times before the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and most recently before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools regarding the recruitment of minority education candidates.  His testimony from that day along with the expert testimony of representatives of Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s) identified that there are systemic barriers to entering EPP’s, many of which are attributed to standardized assessments that are leading to inequitable outcomes.  

Mr. Kummings earned his Bachelor of Arts from Rutgers University, his Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey, and is currently working on a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Rowan University.

Library Launches New Qualitative Data Analysis Software for University Community

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to announce the purchase of a limited number of qualitative data analysis software Atlas.ti (desktop, version 9), and ATLAS.ti Cloud licenses. Atlas.ti (desktop) software supports coding textual, graphical, audio, or video data; managing and annotating a literature review; and creating data visualizations or network diagrams. Atlas.ti cloud is used primarily for text documents and supports collaborative access to shared projects.

Lynn CarrSociology Professor C. Lynn Carr notes: “I love Atlas.ti! I don’t know how I’d do qualitative research with large amounts of data without data management software. Atlas.ti is easy to use for coding data and organizing it. It’s largely intuitive. I find it indispensable for data analysis, assisting me in envisioning relationships among categories as they emerge from the data. In the writing stage, it allows me to easily find the quotes I need.”

Seton Hall University Libraries wishes to acknowledge that this purchase would not have been possible without funding support via special faculty development grants and wishes to extend a thank you to the Office of the Provost. Additionally, SHU’s Department of Information Technology assisted in facilitating the licensing of this software.

How to request and install Atlas.ti?

To request a copy of Atlas.ti use the Atlas.ti request form from SHU Libraries Data Services.

For help with Atlas.ti please contact SHU Libraries Data Services:
https://library.shu.edu/data-services | data.services@shu.edu

Black History Month at the Libraries and Beyond

There are so many ways to get involved and educate yourself for Black History Month (BHM) this February, and beyond. Walsh Library is pleased to partner with and promote events for BHM with various departments and committees across campus, including: Africana Studies and History departments, several Black Student Organizations, and committees.

See a list of BHM events university-wide.

Attend a Library BHM Event

Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics (Wednesday, February 10, 2021 | 2:00pm-3:00pm) Register 

Massive amounts of data, often personal data, are used and gathered in more and more technologies. With that comes the need for data ethics to become better established and understood. Data can be used in helpful and innovative ways, but it can also be used against people and communities, particularly communities of color. Come join us in an introductory discussion of this topic.

Douglass Day Conversation (Friday, February 12, 2021 | 5:30pm-6:30pm) Register 

Celebrate the legacy of Frederick Douglass with mini-lectures by Africana Studies and History faculty about Douglass, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells, and more. Members of SHU Black Student Organizations will help facilitate discussions. We will end with information about how you can contribute to Black feminist scholarship by transcribing the papers of Mary Church Terrell.

Seton Hall University Libraries Speaker’s Series (Wednesday, February 24, 2021 | 4:00pm-5:15pm) Register

      • “Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools”
      • Join guest speakers Elaine Norlin (Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries) and  J. Kenyon Kummings (the Superintendent for New Jersey’s Wildwood Public Schools)  for an engaging discussion on diversity.

#BHM365

Learning about Black history shouldn’t end when February is over. Keep Black History Month going year-round by continuing to educate yourself. Here are some sources to help you:

Art & Visual Culture
The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall has a long history of hosting exhibitions on Black culture. Take a glance through some of these materials pulled together by Gallery Director Jeanne Brasile.

Follow Seton Hall University Libraries on social media for BHM updates and much more!

Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

Love Data Week 2021

Seton Hall University Libraries’ new Data Services Group, is excited to invite the SHU Community to Love Data Week 2021, to be held virtually February 8th-12th .

Love Data Week (LDW) is an international celebration of data, aiming to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services.

Follow ❤ Love Data Week ❤ online at #lovedataweek21

This year’s LDW theme at SHU is “Diversity and Inclusion in Data”. We want to support the SHU community with our data subscriptions (such as ICPSR and PolicyMap) and open source tools to promote finding data related to marginalized communities and BIPOC (black, Indigenous and people of color), and visualizing the information using impartial and fair methods. Programs range from a conversation about Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics, Using PowerBI to identify diversity in your workplace, and finding thematic and minority data collections in ICPSR (Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research).

All are encouraged to learn about Research Data Services now offered by University Libraries, including how to create a data management plan and data storage options with University Libraries. This new offering will help faculty when applying for grants and teach researchers how to manage, preserve and store data for reuse.

Faculty who are unable to attend these sessions can have them delivered during scheduled class time for their students. Make arrangements through your liaison librarian.

Join a session (or a few!) on Microsoft Teams and get connected.

The full schedule and registration is below:

Monday, February 8, 2021

    • R: ggplot (11:00am – 12:00pm)
    • Presenter: Samah Alshrief
    • Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

    • Using PowerBI to Identify Diversity in Your Workplace (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Chelsea Barrett
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

    • Using Excel to Build an Optimal Investment Portfolio  (3:00pm – 3:45pm)
    • Presenter: Prof.  Anthony Loviscek
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

    • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Data Sources in ICPSR (11:00am-12:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Gerry Shea
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

    • Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenters: Prof. Chelsea Barrett & Prof. Brooke Duffy
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Thursday, February 11, 2021


Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Data Driven Decisions in Sports Medicine: Helping Athletes Stay Healthy, Perform Better, and Return to Play After Injury (1:00pm-2:00pm) **SORRY, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Data Narrative Assignment Workshop (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Greg Iannarella
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Facts & Figures Zet Forward  (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenters: Prof. Alan Delozier, Dr. Sarah Ponichtera, & Jeanne Brasile
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Friday, February 12, 2021

Welcome Students!

A big Pirate “Welcome” to new students and “Welcome Back” to returning students!

For Spring Semester 2021, the Library is open 7 days a week (see our hours), starting Wednesday, January 27th.

In accordance with SHU Policy and the SHU Pledge, while you are in the library please remember that in light of the continuing health threat posed by the COVID19 pandemic:

      • masks must be worn at all times.
      • social distancing must be observed (keep a distance of 6 feet between you and others).  Please do not move chairs/desks/furniture to sit closer to someone else. The furniture has been laid out to provide a safe space between others.
      • there is no food allowed (you may not eat in the building).
      • drinks are allowed in covered containers only.
      • group study rooms remain closed and unavailable.
      • library space is available only to SHU ID cardholders at this time. Members of the public, recent graduates, community borrowers, Seton Hall University alumni, retired/emeriti faculty, and visiting scholars are not permitted in the building, with the exception of those who have made prior arrangements with the Archives to consult Special Collections materials.

2021 Spring Semester Hours

2021 Spring Semester Hours

Intersession: Monday, January 4th — Tuesday, January 26th   

        • Monday – Friday              8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday          CLOSED

CLOSED for Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Monday, January 18th


Wednesday, January 27th — Wednesday, March 31st    

        • Monday – Friday                7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday            8:30am – 5:30pm

CLOSED for Easter: Thursday, April 1st – Sunday,  April 4th


Monday, April 5th — Tuesday, May 19th     

        • Monday – Friday               7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday           8:30am – 5:30pm

Wednesday, May 20th — Friday, May 28th     

        • Monday – Friday             8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday         CLOSED

CLOSED Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday,  May 29th – Monday, May 31st

President of SHU Black Student Union on the Meaning of Kwanzaa

Guest blog post by Thanelie Bien-Aime, a senior biology major and president of the Black Student Union (BSU)

I didn’t grow up celebrating Kwanzaa and my first real experience with it was through BSU. Coming into college, I experienced a new sense of Black pride. Through Africana classes and organizations like the Black Student Union, I embraced the connectedness of Pan-Africanism and learned more about black culture, social justice, activism, and community service. Each year, the BSU would host a program to teach and celebrate Kwanzaa, and there would always be community members who had personal stories of the Holiday to share. For example Ghana Hylton, who works within Student Services at SHU, has assisted BSU for the past 2 years to facilitate engaging and informative content. Our main goal is not only to teach the history of the holiday but for people, especially those of African descent, to understand why it is relevant to them.

Kwanzaa’s 7 principles are Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith). All of these principles are significant to my various roles; health advocate, performing artist, student leader, community member, and the list goes on. Kwanzaa empowers my identity and emphasizes my connection to the world. You might not celebrate Kwanzaa with all of the traditional customs or symbols but celebrating can be as simple as allowing the principles to positively change you, your relationships, and your work. Like many holidays, it’s a time that emphasizes reflection, giving, family, community, and culture.
I would suggest taking a look at BSU’s Instagram page @setonhallbsu. We have uploaded Ghana’s Kwanzaa 101 video and our saved IG Live program from earlier this month. We’ll also continue sharing some more Kwanzaa content.

Kwanzaa will begin on Saturday, December 26, 2020 and end on Friday, January 1, 2021. 

For Africana Studies databases, books, and resources, please visit the SHU Libraries Africana Studies Research Guide.

50 Years Later, Msgr. Fahy’s Inaugural Address Foreshadows Issues of Today

Guest Blog Post By Angela Kariotis Kotsonis

 

Portrait of Msgr Fahy with books and a basketball hoop
Portrait of Monsignor Fahy by John Canfield, untitled publication by the Seton Hall Office of Public Relations, 1976, held the Priest Vertical Files of the Archdiocese of Newark, Box 24

I learned about Monsignor Fahy in the spring semester of 2018. It was at an intergenerational panel discussion at the Walsh Library of former Seton Hall student-activist leaders. The event was organized by the Concerned 44, an activated student group. The panel discussion was a teach-in about the history of protest on Seton Hall’s campus and discussion about the progress of the then student movement. You can follow the Concerned 44 on Instagram. If it weren’t for this panel discussion I would not have learned about President Fahy and I’d still be pronouncing Fahy Hall wrong. As an alumna, I can’t help but be angry that it took this long. I became more interested and invited colleagues into the journey of getting to know Fahy.

Alan Delozier, University Archivist, did the work to uncover the Fahy Inaugural address which is as relevant today as it was 50 years ago. The CORE has integrated the speech as a required reading for the Journey of Transformations course. And this article intends to showcase a digital

Newspaper Clipping of Msgr Fahy with Black Studies faculty
Monsignor Fahy with the leadership of the Black Studies Program, Newark Star Ledger, April 21, 1975

communal reading of the text as an activist performance practice. The point of the project is to position the text and its ethos as a cultural imprint on our collective memory. To me, Fahy is a white anti-racist abolitionist ancestor who risked and used his power to benefit others. Social justice is a term we’re hearing a lot. What is it? How do you define it? What does it look like? Everyone will have a different answer. I define it as: righting a wrong. If it doesn’t right a wrong, it is not justice. Not only did Fahy leverage his power to right a wrong with some of the most impactful undertakings of Seton Hall’s history but he acknowledged the problem. Often, we rush to solutions without first doing the self interrogation to name the problem. He used this moment, his inaugural address, when everyone was listening and we’re still listening 50 years later. 

The video, this collective recitation, brings many voices together for one message. Faculty and students, separate, but together. It carves a lineage. There are protests now as there were 50 years ago. In the streets and on our campus. 

Greg Iannarella offers insight into what moved him to gravitate toward one of the most unwavering parts of Fahy’s speech, “This section always felt really powerful to me. The description, the intentional language, invoking real scenes and real communities, conjuring the people! It’s a moment where he turns the gaze outward and challenges the audience to see what is relevant.”

Participants were encouraged to think about their location as a backdrop. These choices offer additional meaning and subtext. Virtual performance lets us become our own set designers. Brooke Duffy presented her portion outside of a new school. “It is a public elementary school in Teaneck that was recently renamed for Theodora Smiley Lacey, a civil rights activist, ‘living legend.’ The NorthJersey.com website describes, ‘it was because of her efforts that Teaneck became the first city in the United States to voluntarily integrate its public schools.’”

Program of Monsignor Fahy's Inaugural Address
Program of Monsignor Fahy’s Inaugural Address, October 14, 1970, from the Priest Vertical Files held by the Archdiocese of Newark, Box 24.

This isn’t the last we’ll hear of Fahy’s address. Jon Radwan describes a new participatory oral history project designed to ensure access, inclusion, and equity in its research process to document and preserve the entirety of this part of the University’s history. “We are confident that the Inaugural Address is only the beginning of learning about Msgr. Fahy’s social justice leadership. Our recent proposal to the New Jersey Council for the Humanities seeks funding for a large scale oral history project. We plan to contact alumni, faculty, and administrators who worked closely with Fahy to record their stories about SHU’s collaboration with Newark activists to launch the Black Studies Center.” To support this project please contact Angela Kariotis and Jon Radwan.

Centering historical figures creates their own mythology. Retrospectives are not without their limitations. But there are so few white allies to look up to for this work. Allies must dig deep, activating themselves, stepping into their consciousness. We can extend the Fahy legacy and course correct. Like 50 years ago, it is a transformative yet fragile time. We must have the will to meet it.