Books Unite Us, Censorship Divides Us: Banned Books Week 2022

Allison Piazza, Medical Librarian, IHS Campus

September 18 – 24 is Banned Books Week, which “celebrates the freedom to read and spotlights current and historical attempts to censor books in libraries and schools.” For over 40 years, Banned Books Week has brought people together in “shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.”

Banned Books Week is both a reminder of the unifying power of stories and the divisiveness of censorship, and a call to action for readers across the country to push back against censorship attempts in their communities.

Below is a sampling of books available in our library collection that have been challenged or banned in the United States. Click on the book title to be taken to the eBook.

To learn more about books that have been challenged or banned, visit “Frequently Challenged Books” page from the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom

Fun Home CoverFun Home Alison Bechdel

Alice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Pedagogy of the OppressedPedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

The Call of the WildThe Call of the Wild by Jack London

The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

White FragilityWhite Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo

The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksThe immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Autobiography of Malcolm XThe Autobiography of Malcolm X with the assistance of Alex Haley

 

Link to original post: https://blogs.shu.edu/ihsl/2022/09/20/books-unite-us-censorship-divides-us-banned-books-week-2022/

Constitutional Anniversaries – New Jersey & United States Statutory Documents, 1787-Present

Alan Delozier, Humanities Librarian

This September marks the diamond anniversary of the New Jersey Constitution Committee (1947) and 235 years since the creation of the United States Constitution. The story behind each text carries a deep historical legacy combined with outlining the goals associated with the ideal functions of national and state governments alike. In research terms, each charter has provided extensive scholarship opportunities for the public that the Seton Hall University Libraries has supported over the past several years.

The United States Constitution is the recognized law of the nation which outlines how the government is required to function. It makes provisions for three distinctive divisions of authority – Executive, Legislative, and Judicial. Since 1787, the Constitution proper has been amended 27 times (with the first ten constituting the United States Bill of Rights created on September 25, 1789 and ratified in 1791) through its history and is devoted mainly to individual liberties.

Combined with the abovementioned overview, Articles III-VII principally cover State-focused governance issues. New Jersey was the third state to ratify the United States Constitution in 1789 and in large measure this helped to inspire the content found within the New Jersey Constitution and its two post-Revolution versions. This document is based on the previous State Constitution of 1776 and the first major revised manuscript in 1844 which highlighted such freedoms as religious practice, speech, and related liberties. After a century, the need for an updated State Statute was facilitated through the creation of Governor Alfred E. Driscoll’s Committee on Preparatory Research in early 1947.  (“Convention Proceedings Record,” State of New Jersey Constitutional Convention of 1947, v.1, iii-1)

A Mid-Twentieth Century Volume that was commonly found in schools throughout New Jersey including this 1948 copy included within the Seton Hall University Libraries (Call Number: JK11 1948 O94)

Between June 12th and September 10th of 1947 (a deadline of September 13th for close of the Committee Hearings was set ahead of time and met), the Delegates produced a final draft of the newly updated State Constitution. This document was ultimately ratified via a majority vote on the referendum presented to the citizens of New Jersey during the Election of 1947 held on November 4th of that year. (“Convention Proceedings Record,” State of New Jersey Constitutional Convention of 1947, v.1, 923)

During the 1940s-60s, Students in New Jersey Were Presented With a Copy of the volume – “Our Great State Documents” as part of their study on Citizenship

There are numerous study prospects for both the United States and New Jersey Constitutions and user friendly access points available through the Seton Hall University Libraries including the following leads and links highlighted below . . .

United States Constitution – SetonCat Holdings (Print and E-Book) .https://setonhall.on.worldcat.org/search?queryString=%22United%20States%20Constitution%22&clusterResults=true&groupVariantRecords=false

 

United States Constitution – SetonCat Holdings (Articles)

https://eds.s.ebscohost.com/eds/results?vid=0&sid=fa910d90-4058-4ec2-956a-d04961218093%40redis&bquery=%2522United%2BStates%2BConstitution%2522&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPXNzbyZ0eXBlPTAmc2VhcmNoTW9kZT1BbmQmc2l0ZT1lZHMtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d

 

United States Constitution – Hathi Trust

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ls?q1=%22united+states+constitution%22&field1=ocr&a=srchls&ft=ft&lmt=ft

 

United States Constitution – National Archives Site

https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript

 

New Jersey Constitution – SetonCat Holdings (Print and E-Book)

https://setonhall.on.worldcat.org/search?clusterResults=off&queryString=New+Jersey+Constitution

 

New Jersey Constitution of 1947 – SetonCat Post-Committee and Ratification Produced Holdings (Articles)

https://eds.s.ebscohost.com/eds/results?vid=0&sid=66f892a3-3084-451d-bef5-39fc389ea6da%40redis&bquery=%2522new%2Bjersey%2Bconstitution%2522%2Band%2B%25221947%2522&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPXNzbyZ0eXBlPTAmc2VhcmNoTW9kZT1BbmQmc2l0ZT1lZHMtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d

New Jersey Constitution of 1947, A Retrospective – Seton Hall Legislative Journal, 7:3, 1997

https://heinonline.org/HOL/Page?handle=hein.journals/shclj7&id=829&collection=journals&index=

New Jersey Constitution of 1947 – Hathi Trust

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ls?q1=%22new+jersey+constitution%22+and+1947&field1=ocr&a=srchls&ft=ft&lmt=ft

New Jersey Constitution of 1947 – Full-Text Site

https://www.nj.gov/state/archives/docconst47.html

For more information on the history of constitutions please feel free to contact Alan Delozier, Humanities Librarian at Alan.Delozier@shu.edu or by phone at: (973) 275-2378

“Pirates” – The Unveiling and Embrace of the Iconic Seton Hall Nickname

Introduction

By Alan Delozier, Humanities Librarian

Beyond an educated choice of academic specializations, the selection of a nickname, mascot, school colors, special cheers, and other unique campus traditions have long been one of the most important legacies that any college or university can make to universally celebrate their respective athletic teams in particular while honoring their student, alumni, and fan base by extension.  On a competitive level sports-wise, there have been an abundance of Tigers, Bulldogs, Lions, Bears, and other wildlife for example in order to show team pride and hopefully inspire fear in opponents.  However, other appellations have a logical link to history including such local models as the “Queensmen” of Rutgers College (founded in 1766 as Queen’s College) and the “Vikings” of Upsala (established in 1893 by Swedish educators who noted the nickname was synonymous with Scandinavian lore).  Beyond what their opponents were formulating when it came to their own respective mascot preferences, Seton Hall had its own road to image-based immortality.

Throughout its storied history, the hues of “White and Blue” have always been synonymous with Seton Hall.  These colors were adopted during the nineteenth century and likely inspired by Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley whose family crest features a series of white stars affixed to a cobalt field.  Additionally, Blue is associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary, one of the early patronesses of the school and associated with finding truth while White is the symbol of purity, light, and saints who were not martyred (although Elizabeth Ann Seton was not canonized until 1975, she did not achieve martyrdom). Link to full story here.

5 Things for Transfer Students to Know about Seton Hall Libraries

The best place to start familiarizing yourself with the library and our services would be our video tutorials covering a range of topics from how to navigate our site to starting your search, refining your topic, and accessing our vast catalogue of resources.

Be sure to take advantage of our research guides covering a whole range of subjects and disciplines. They curate the most relevant and helpful resources from our databases and across the web, giving you the tools to quickly kickstart your search. Each guide also includes the contact information of the relevant subject liaison librarian, if you have more questions or need more in-depth help.

Our Data Services group provides workshops on how to use different tools and software and consultations to help you find, manage, analyze, and visualize data for your coursework and research.

Not finding what you’re looking for? You can submit a request for a journal article or book not accessible through our catalogue and we’ll be able to borrow it on your behalf from our partner university libraries. An article can be in your inbox within 24 hours or so, physical books will take a longer, so don’t wait till the last minute!

Still have any unanswered questions? Be sure to use the pop-up chat to ask our librarians for help, available Monday-Thursday 10am-6pm and Fridays 10am-12pm. You can also peruse our frequently asked questions or submit your own. For more-depth, be sure to schedule a research appointment with one of our librarians. You can request a specific one or we can help pair you based on your topic.

Welcome Back! Fall Hours, Services, and More

Welcome back to campus for our returning students, faculty, and staff, and a very special welcome to those of you who are at SHU for your first semester!

Here are the answers to some commonly asked questions about the library. If you don’t see the answer to your question here or need more help, please reach out to us: Ask Us page and FAQs.

Regular Fall Semester Hours:

Monday – Friday: 8am – Midnight
Saturday: 9am – 5pm
Sunday: 11am – Midnight

Check our calendar for daily Library Hours.

Visit our newly updated Quick Start to Using Walsh Library for an introduction to our services, spaces, and resources.

 

Faculty Resources

Graduate Student Resources

Need help seeing if the library has your textbook? Search our library catalog for the book (video tutorial on how to search), or check our Course Reserves to see if your professor left a copy for your class to use. For help with textbook purchases or rentals, visit the SHU Bookstore.

 

Research Advice from a Senior Diplomacy Student

Laura Rogers
Laura Rogers, recent Seton Hall graduate and former student library worker

The library has many resources available that I wish I’d known about as a freshman, especially for Diplomacy students. As someone who has worked at the library for the last four years, I’d recommend that all students familiarize themselves with the library’s website, as most questions regarding the library can be answered there. On the website, you can find comprehensive lists of available books and eBooks, which are separated by subject. Many professors will put their textbooks on permanent reserve at the library. I highly recommend taking advantage of this resource, since I know how expensive some books can be and how they add up. Professors don’t always announce when books are on reserve so it’s important to check the website for yourself, especially because some professors use the same textbooks for different classes.

Another aspect of the library that few students know about is the newspaper subscriptions that are available through the website. I know that many professors encourage students to stay up to date on current events, whether it be through news or journal articles. Many of these are available for free online through the library. So, if you need to access to major newspapers like the New York Times or Wall Street Journal among others, I encourage all students to look at the subscriptions the school already has access to.

All disciplines have research guides, which are a great starting point for finding relevant databases and resources. They’re written by expert liaison librarians for each major, so I highly recommend students find out who their librarian is! I personally met with the Diplomacy subject librarian over the past four years by making a research appointment. I met with her several times to discuss papers I’ve written, including my senior thesis. She was incredibly helpful in providing me with tips to locate the sources I needed.

While the website covers most of the resources you’ll need, our subject librarians and circulation staff are always welcome to help any students navigate the resources the library offers in person or over chat or email.

 

Podcast on American Catholicism Drops

Image of Margaret M. McGuinness, Ph.D. is Professor of Religion at La Salle UniversityWe are happy to announce the latest installment of the University Libraries podcast series entitled: Zet Forward. This podcast entitled: “American Catholicism” features an interview by University Archivist, Alan Delozier, D.Litt. with Dr. Margaret McGuinness and Dr. Tom Rzeznik who collaborated on the edited work: The Cambridge Companion of American Catholicism (Cambridge University, 2021). Margaret M. McGuinness, Ph.D. is Professor of Religion at La Salle University.  Thomas F. Rzeznik, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of History at Seton Hall University and coeditor of the quarterly journal, American Catholic Studies. He is author of Church and Estate: Religion and Wealth in Industrial-Era Philadelphia (2013). This podcast covered a number of topics within the American Catholic experience in both a historical and contemporary context.

You can find this podcast at Podcast @ Seton Hall University. Please check it out along with our other sessions conducted by Professor Chelsea Barrett and Professor Gerry Shea.

Zet Forward is a podcast to celebrate authors and other individuals who are involved with projects for the benefit of Seton Hall University and the wider world.  The series began in February of 2022.

Get to Know the Library Staff: Stephen Bacchetta, Records Manager and Digital Archivist

Stephen Bacchetta is the Records Manager and Digital Archivist at Seton Hall University. As the Records Manager for the university, he manages the storage and security of records from departments around campus that must be retained for operational, historical, and legal reasons. In his archival role, Stephen’s primary responsibility is with SHU-related collections. He helps support the departmental initiative of making our digital objects accessible to the public by working with Seton Hall’s collection management system and digital preservation software. Stephen is a graduate of the MI program at Rutgers University and earned a B.A. in English from Montclair State University.

1. How long have you been working at the library?

Two months.

2. What was the last book you read that you really enjoyed?

The Thursday Murder Club. I’m in a murder mystery book club and this was one of my favorites so far!

3. What is the best way to rest / decompress?

Get into bed early, put on some relaxing music, and do a crossword puzzle.

4. What superpower would you want?

The ability to fly so I won’t have to sit in traffic anymore.

5. Do you have a favorite sports team?

It’s a tie between the New York Giants and the New York Mets. Depends if it’s football or baseball season!

6. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with?

Any of my favorite comedians! Steve Martin, Norm MacDonald, Jerry Seinfeld, Daniel Tosh, the list goes on and on…

Get to Know the Library Staff: Ryan Fino, Library Technology Coordinator

Ryan Fino is the Library Technology Coordinator for the University Library. He handles the technical support, manages the tech projects and does some of the tech purchasing on behalf of the staff and faculty in the library. He graduated from Lehigh University with a degree in Computer Engineering and is nearing the completion of his MBA in IT Management from our very own Stillman School of Business! In his free time he enjoys video games with friends and golfing with his father.

  1. How long have you been working at the library?
    I started in May 2017 so I will be starting my 5th year this May.
  2. What was the last book you read that you really enjoyed?
    Technically the last book was Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson but the whole Stormlight Archive series is a must read for any fantasy fan!
  3. Print book or ebook?
    Audiobook! I consume most books on my way to and from work! However, without that option, print book.
  4. What is your favorite spot on campus?
    Before it was removed, I really enjoyed going to The Cove and getting their Boland Pizza.
  5. Do you have a favorite sports team?
    The main sport that I follow is football and my team is the New Orleans Saints, fitting for our Catholic University, I would say! 😉
  6. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with?
    Bruce Dickinson, the lead singer of Iron Maiden would have so many amazing stories to tell!

Dr. Chistopher Tienken Joins Zet Forward Podcast

We are happy to announce the second episode of the libraries’ new podcast series, Zet Forward, dropped in March. In the episode, Gerry Shea, Communication Librarian at Walsh Library, talks with Dr. Christopher Tienken from the College of Education & Human Services about his book The School Reform Landscape Reloaded: More Fraud, Myths, and Lies.

Dr. Tienken is an associate professor of Education Leadership, Management, and Policy at Seton Hall University in the College of Education and Human Services. He is the former editor of the American Association of School Administrators Journal of Scholarship and Practice and the current editor of the Kappa Delta Pi Record. His research interests include school reform issues such as standardization, the influence of curriculum quality on student outcomes, and the construct validity of high-stakes  standardized tests as decision-making tools. He has authored over 85 publications. His new book, with Carol Mullen, is The Risky Business of Education Policy.

You can find Dr. Tienken on Twitter @ChrisTienken and also at his website.

You can find the podcast at Podcast @ Seton Hall University. Please check it out when you have time.