Get to Know the Library Staff! Elizabeth Leonard

Elizabeth Leonard is the Assistant Dean of Information Technologies and Collection Services. Her fantastic team runs “the back of the house,” managing the online library and ensuring that electronic and digital materials are findable and accessible. 

1. How long have you been working at the library?
I’ve been working at Seton Hall since 2013.

2. What is a book that everyone should read?
Any book that brings them enjoyment. I have no patience with the idea that folks need to read something because everyone else is, or because someone said it is a “must read.” Reading should be a pleasure, like the smell of spring flowers or a hug from a friend.

3. What music are you listening to these days?
Not music—I’ve been listening to podcasts, mostly. Hidden Brain (Science/psychology), Amended (stories of women who fought racism, classism, and xenophobia), OnBeing (conversations about spirituality, science, social healing, and the arts).

4. Last music concert you attended?
Facebook live streamed concert of the Indigo Girls.

5. What is your favorite spot on campus? 
Currently, I love to walk past the peony plants on the path leading to the entrance of the Dining Hall. Those are my favorite flowers.

6. Do you have a good take-out or delivery spot you’d recommend? 
A colleague and I love to go to Jackie and Son. They have great, fresh food!

7. What is your favorite app? 
Probably the New York Times Crossword app. I do the crossword everyday.

8. What is a skill you are working on mastering? 
Not interrupting. I’ve been working on it my whole life (unsuccessfully). My brain generally moves at warp speed and my mouth forgets that it isn’t supposed to join in!

9. What is something most people don’t know about you? 
I spent three years living in Germany, working for the Department of Defense. (Please don’t ask me to speak German anymore; I’ve forgotten most of it!)

10. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with?
Ruth Bader Ginsburg or Eleanor Roosevelt.

Celebrate Caribbean American Heritage Month

Happy Caribbean American Heritage Month! Chelsea Barrett, Business Librarian / Africana Studies Liaison, in partnership with Sarah Ponichtera, Assistant Dean for Special Collections & the Gallery, have compiled a list of information on Caribbean American culture, life, and history.

Resources
A Proclamation on National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2021
President Joseph Biden’s statement on Caribbean Heritage Month where he speaks on the importance of Caribbean Americans, including Vice President Kamala Harris and honoring others that have contributed to the nation’s progression.

Caribbean American Heritage Month: Caribbean History and Culture
The U.S. Department of the Interior highlighted information on Caribbean History and Culture from a governmental perspective. See information on Caribbean-related legislation, Caribbean demographics, music, food and much more!

Archives and Special Collections
The SHU Archives and Special Collections would like to highlight MSS 36, The Cause of Pierre Toussaint.  This collection documents the activism of two individuals who sought to have Pierre Toussaint, the 18th century Haitian American former slave turned New York philanthropist buried at St. Patrick’s, canonized as a saint.  The collection includes letters of these individuals to figures in the Catholic Church, including Archbishops and the Pope advocating for this cause, photographs of his former burial place and re-burial at St. Patrick’s, and poems written in support of the cause. The materials are mainly from the 1990s.

Interested in this collection? Visit our finding aid for more information.

If you are interested in viewing the original materials, feel free to make an appointment with the SHU Archives and Special Collections.

Read
Interested in some Caribbean Reads? View our book display here and feel free to send recommendations!! Caribbean American Heritage Month Virtual Display

Watch
PBS – Caribbean American Heritage Month

Research Help & Resources
Africana Studies Librarians-send an email or schedule a chat!
Africana Studies GuideCaribbean Page

Social Media
Follow the SHU West Indian Student Organization on Instagram for amazing Caribbean content! @shu_wiso

Follow Seton Hall University Libraries on social media for Caribbean American posts, updates and much more! Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

Blog post by Chelsea Barrett, Business Librarian / Africana Studies Liaison.

New Enhancements in PolicyMap

See what’s new in PolicyMap, a GIS mapping tool, which is used at SHU in many programs such as Public Health, Political Science and Education for student assignments and useful data for grant applications.  There are fantastic new enhancements to make PolicyMap even more essential in your classroom and for your research including simplified data labels, histograms for ranges, an amazing number of boundaries and custom regions you can create, data benchmarks for context and the ability to add local data to PolicyMap that is important for your research. On  June 1,  the Libraries held a webinar that looked at new data including predominant race, mortgage denials/redlining, Social Vulnerability Index (CDC), andjh Medically Underserved Areas.  The recording of the June 1 webinar is located here.  Additional sessions will be scheduled over the summer.  Stay tuned to SHU Libraries social media.

Information about new features is listed below:

There are additional resources available with sample assignments about using PolicyMap in the classroom here:  https://policymap.helpdocs.io/academic-resources.

Please contact your liaison librarian for more information about PolicyMap.

 

 

 

 

 

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Library Summer Hours

SHU_Libraries is as excited about this upcoming summer as you are! With all that excitement in the air, we want to remind every student, faculty, staff, and administrator:

I. Individuals who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear a mask or practice social distancing indoors on each campus and at indoor, off-campus University activities. However, they are welcome to wear a mask if they choose. Individuals who are not fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask indoors on each campus and at indoor, off-campus University activities

Enforcement is via the honor code. We expect everyone will be truthful in their reporting and activities.

II. Food is not permitted in the library, but covered drinks and water bottles are allowed.

III. Guests, visitors and alumni are not permitted in the library.


L I B R A R Y   S U M M E R   H O U R S   2 0 2 1

Monday, May 3rd  Wednesday, May 19th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 10:30pm
                • Saturday & Sunday          8:30am – 5:30pm

Thursday, May 20th  Friday, May 28th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 6:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday         CLOSED

Memorial Day Weekend
Saturday, May 29th – Monday, May 31st CLOSED


Tuesday, June 1st  Friday, August 6th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 6:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday        9:00am – 4:00pm

* Juneteenth Friday, June 18th      7:30am – 3:30pm *
* CLOSED Sunday, July 4th – Monday, July 5th *
* CLOSED Saturday, August 7th – Sunday, August 8th *


  Monday, August 9th  — Sunday, August 29th

                • Monday – Friday            8:00am – 5:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday        CLOSED

Resources for AAPI Heritage Month!

Walsh Library is pleased to partner with various departments and committees across campus in support of AAPI Heritage Month! Learn more about AAPI Heritage with the following Library Resources.

Watch
Asian Americans PBS Documentary

Read
AAPI Heritage Month Virtual Book Display
We selected fiction and non-fiction books from authors of a wide variety of AAPI backgrounds and experiences, including All Over Creation by Ruth Ozeki, All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung, and The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri.

Drs. Xue-Ming Bao and Alan Delozier of the University Libraries compiled the following bibliographies of resources:

We also have AAPI Heritage Guest Lecturer, Dr. Cindy I-fen Cheng’s book available for access as an ebook: Citizens of Asian America: Democracy and Race during the Cold War

Research Help & Resources
Xue-Ming Bao, Asian Studies Librarian – send an email, or schedule a chat!
Asian Studies Research Guide
Race & Racial Studies Research Guide
Anti-Racism Resources

Art & Visual Culture
The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall has a long history of exhibiting and collecting art by AAPI artists. Take a glance through some of these materials pulled together by Gallery Director Jeanne Brasile.

Take a peak at our Google Arts & Culture online exhibition of Chinese and Japanese ceramics.

Follow Seton Hall University Libraries on social media for AAPI Heritage Month posts, updates and much more! Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

AAPI Heritage Month Events at Seton Hall

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental Health Awareness Month has been observed in May in the United States since 1949. In 2021 mental health awareness is more essential than ever.

#MHAM  #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth #MentalHealthMatters

Seton Hall University Libraries is proud to support and encourage our community through highlighting a selection of resources that can educate and empower everyone.

 LIBRARY RESOURCES


CAMPUS RESOURCES

Counseling and Psychological Services


RESOURCES FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS


 NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml

Mental Health America https://www.mhanational.org/

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) https://www.nami.org/home

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

          • Seton Hall University – University Libraries (Fall 2021)
          • Application Deadline: July 15, 2021
          • Fellowship Period: Fall 2021

Background

Seton Hall University Libraries support excellence in academic and individual work, enable inquiry, foster intellectual and ethical integrity and respect for diverse points of view through user-focused services and robust collections as the intellectual and cultural heart of the University.  Walsh Gallery, based in the Library, manages the University’s museum collections, and the Library’s Data Services division assists the University community in managing and presenting their data.

One of Seton Hall University’s most distinguished collections, the D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, includes coins of ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire and Byzantium as well as a small collection of related Byzantine and Etruscan artifacts: oil lamps, game pieces, weights and terra cotta figurines. Donor Ron D’Argenio became interested in ancient coins when taking courses in Greek drama and history as an undergraduate at Fordham University in the 1970’s. In 2001, he generously donated his collection to Seton Hall University in memory of his father, Rinaldo J. D’Argenio, who served in World War II and was awarded a Bronze Star for his valor. Ron D’Argenio is a practicing attorney working in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The collection is available for study and research by students and scholars.

Data Services offers consultations to SHU community members assisting them with every stage of a data project from conceptualization, to choosing tools, to data analysis, to sharing results.  Find more on the tools supported here: https://library.shu.edu/data-services.

Request for Proposals

The University Libraries seeks fellowship proposals using the Ron D’Argenio Collection as the basis for projects in the following two areas:

          • Classics, Art History or History : a scholar from one of these fields, a related field or interdisciplinary scholar who would be able to analyze the collection in its historical context and add to our knowledge of the objects.
          • Data Visualization: a specialist in data visualization, who would be able to create – in conversation with the humanities scholar (above) – an interactive visual representation of the collection that would allow users to explore the objects by interpreting and presenting the data in a number of ways (see all the coins within a certain date range, or all coins from a particular region, for example).

Specialists who have at minimum completed all coursework for the the terminal degree in their area are invited to propose research projects that fall under one or both of the above areas. Preference will go to the strongest applications that are both feasible for this collection and our technology infrastructure. All projects should incorporate the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities.  The final product for the Classics/Art History/History scholar would take the form of a short (5-7 page) written report interpreting the collection which would additionally be shared with the University community as an article or lecture.  The Data Visualization scholar would be responsible for producing a data visualization project which would be publicly presented on the University Libraries website and the process of creation described in an article or lecture.  Beyond the duration of the fellowship, the work of both fellows will inform future initiatives with the collection.

You can view a small portion of the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities on our Google Arts and Culture page or you may make a research appointment to gather additional data and/or view the collection by contacting us at walshgallery@shu.edu or 973-275-2033.

Terms/Eligibility for Fellowships

Scholars who at minimum have completed all coursework for the terminal degree in their field may apply.  Work can be performed remotely for the most part.  Access to the collections on site is conducted in a socially distanced environment compliant with all recommendations aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19.  The University Libraries will provide each fellow with access to its library databases and resources, accounts in and support for the data software available, an email address and access to Microsoft Teams software for collaboration and Sharepoint for storage space.  Fellows will be expected to give a presentation or write an article on their project to share with the University community by the fall of 2022.

Fellows will be paid a stipend of $2,500 for projects that focus on one of the two areas. Half will be paid on award, half on project completion.  Applicants may propose a project that incorporates both Classical scholarship and data visualization for a combined $5000 to be disbursed in the same way.

Procedures

Submit a single pdf including the following components as an email attachment to library@shu.edu :

          • an application cover sheet (which includes your name, project title, contact information and a short bio.
          • a two-page statement (roughly 500 words), describing your research project and its relation to the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, in which you explain how it fits into your past research (if applicable) and future plans.
          • a curriculum vitae
          • a recent example of scholarship

Notifications

Submissions must be received by July 15, 2021. Applicants will be notified by September 1, 2021. Research should take place in the fall of 2021, and the project results (written work or data visualization) completed by May 31, 2022. The lecture or article on the project should take place in the spring or fall of 2022. Please contact Sarah Ponichtera, Assistant Dean of Special Collections and the Gallery at sarah.ponichtera@shu .edu with any questions.

Come Celebrate Shakespeare at the University Libraries

To mark the 457th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, University Libraries highlights resources focused on one of the world’s greatest playwrights.

If you would like to watch productions of Shakespeare’s most famous plays, please check out the BBC Shakespeare Plays. This collection features 37 plays produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

The New Oxford Shakespeare presents an entirely new consideration of all of Shakespeare’s works, edited from first principles from the original texts themselves, and drawing on the latest textual and theatrical scholarship. The Oxford Scholarly Editions Online brings the content of all three print volumes together as one powerful resource.

Additionally, University Libraries subscribes to some of the top Shakespeare studies journals including: Shakespeare, Shakespeare Quarterly and Shakespeare Studies. Shakespeare is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of Shakespeare. It publishes articles on criticism, performance, and the history of Shakespeare and his works. Shakespeare Quarterly is peer-reviewed journal published for the Folger Shakespeare Library by the Oxford University Press. The journal publishes original works related to all aspects of Shakespeare studies. Shakespeare Studies is a peer-reviewed volume published annually with a focus on Shakespeare studies and theatre. The journal features the work of performance scholars, literary critics, and cultural historians.

Lastly, the Library provides access to subscription-based or open-access scholarly resources such as Folgerpedia, Open-Source Shakespeare, JSTOR Understanding Shakespeare, and Shakespeare in the Digital Age from the University of Notre Dame.

Ophelia Master’s Thesis Gets 2000 Hits: Mystery Solved?

The master’s thesis: Ophelia’s Mistreatment and Ignored Monastic Opportunities by Seton Hall graduate Danielle Tovsen has been downloaded nearly 2000 times since the end of 2017. Tovsen graduated from Seton Hall in 2010 with an MA in English. She argues in her thesis “that Ophelia could have saved her own life if she had left home and fled to a nunnery; the treatment she received from Laertes and Polonius was worse than Hamlet’s treatment of her throughout the play.”

Dr. Marta Deyrup, Outreach and Humanities Librarian at University Libraries, discovered the thesis while doing research on Shakespeare in the Seton Hall eRepository. The high number of downloads impressed Dr. Deyrup, which led her to contact Dr. Chrysanthy Grieco, the advisor on the thesis and both a former dean of University Libraries and chair of the English Department. Dr. Grieco could not answer why it has had close to 2000 hits, but she did say “that’s an astounding number for an MA paper.” She also guessed “that those interested in feminist texts—though I doubt this is one—found some yeast for their bread” in Tovsen’s work.

Another interesting aspect of the mystery is the location of the downloads. A good number of the downloads were from educational institutions such as the Michigan Statewide Educational Network and Orange County Department of Education. Dr. Deyrup thinks this might indicate the thesis is being used to support the research of middle and high school students.

Get to Know the Library Staff! Patrick McCall

Patrick McCall is the library’s Records Manager and Digital Specialist. He handles institutional records from across campus, and is working through the Everest that is the backlog of Seton Hall archival collections. He graduated in 2019 and this is first full time position in the field.

1. How long have you been working at the library?
I’ve worked at Walsh Library since November of 2019.

2. What was the last book you read that you really enjoyed? 
I recently finished Star Wars: Light of the Jedi.

3. Print book or ebook? 
Always print books!

4. What superpower would you want? 
The ability to stop time, because then I would have enough time to sleep and read AND binge TV.

5. Are you a morning person or a night owl? 
Night owl. If I could stay in bed until noon every day, I would.