Welcome Students!

A big Pirate “Welcome” to new students and “Welcome Back” to returning students!

For Spring Semester 2021, the Library is open 7 days a week (see our hours), starting Wednesday, January 27th.

In accordance with SHU Policy and the SHU Pledge, while you are in the library please remember that in light of the continuing health threat posed by the COVID19 pandemic:

      • masks must be worn at all times.
      • social distancing must be observed (keep a distance of 6 feet between you and others).  Please do not move chairs/desks/furniture to sit closer to someone else. The furniture has been laid out to provide a safe space between others.
      • there is no food allowed (you may not eat in the building).
      • drinks are allowed in covered containers only.
      • group study rooms remain closed and unavailable.
      • library space is available only to SHU ID cardholders at this time. Members of the public, recent graduates, and alumni are not permitted in the building, with the exception of those who have made prior arrangements with the Archives to consult Special Collections materials.

2021 Spring Semester Hours

2021 Spring Semester Hours

Intersession: Monday, January 4th — Tuesday, January 26th   

        • Monday – Friday              8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday          CLOSED

CLOSED for Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Monday, January 18th


Wednesday, January 27th — Wednesday, March 31st    

        • Monday – Friday                7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday            8:30am – 5:30pm

CLOSED for Easter: Thursday, April 1st – Sunday,  April 4th


Monday, April 5th — Tuesday, May 19th     

        • Monday – Friday               7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday           8:30am – 5:30pm

Wednesday, May 20th — Friday, May 28th     

        • Monday – Friday             8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday         CLOSED

CLOSED Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday,  May 29th – Monday, May 31st

President of SHU Black Student Union on the Meaning of Kwanzaa

Guest blog post by Thanelie Bien-Aime, a senior biology major and president of the Black Student Union (BSU)

I didn’t grow up celebrating Kwanzaa and my first real experience with it was through BSU. Coming into college, I experienced a new sense of Black pride. Through Africana classes and organizations like the Black Student Union, I embraced the connectedness of Pan-Africanism and learned more about black culture, social justice, activism, and community service. Each year, the BSU would host a program to teach and celebrate Kwanzaa, and there would always be community members who had personal stories of the Holiday to share. For example Ghana Hylton, who works within Student Services at SHU, has assisted BSU for the past 2 years to facilitate engaging and informative content. Our main goal is not only to teach the history of the holiday but for people, especially those of African descent, to understand why it is relevant to them.

Kwanzaa’s 7 principles are Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith). All of these principles are significant to my various roles; health advocate, performing artist, student leader, community member, and the list goes on. Kwanzaa empowers my identity and emphasizes my connection to the world. You might not celebrate Kwanzaa with all of the traditional customs or symbols but celebrating can be as simple as allowing the principles to positively change you, your relationships, and your work. Like many holidays, it’s a time that emphasizes reflection, giving, family, community, and culture.
I would suggest taking a look at BSU’s Instagram page @setonhallbsu. We have uploaded Ghana’s Kwanzaa 101 video and our saved IG Live program from earlier this month. We’ll also continue sharing some more Kwanzaa content.

Kwanzaa will begin on Saturday, December 26, 2020 and end on Friday, January 1, 2021. 

For Africana Studies databases, books, and resources, please visit the SHU Libraries Africana Studies Research Guide.

50 Years Later, Msgr. Fahy’s Inaugural Address Foreshadows Issues of Today

Guest Blog Post By Angela Kariotis Kotsonis

 

Portrait of Msgr Fahy with books and a basketball hoop
Portrait of Monsignor Fahy by John Canfield, untitled publication by the Seton Hall Office of Public Relations, 1976, held the Priest Vertical Files of the Archdiocese of Newark, Box 24

I learned about Monsignor Fahy in the spring semester of 2018. It was at an intergenerational panel discussion at the Walsh Library of former Seton Hall student-activist leaders. The event was organized by the Concerned 44, an activated student group. The panel discussion was a teach-in about the history of protest on Seton Hall’s campus and discussion about the progress of the then student movement. You can follow the Concerned 44 on Instagram. If it weren’t for this panel discussion I would not have learned about President Fahy and I’d still be pronouncing Fahy Hall wrong. As an alumna, I can’t help but be angry that it took this long. I became more interested and invited colleagues into the journey of getting to know Fahy.

Alan Delozier, University Archivist, did the work to uncover the Fahy Inaugural address which is as relevant today as it was 50 years ago. The CORE has integrated the speech as a required reading for the Journey of Transformations course. And this article intends to showcase a digital

Newspaper Clipping of Msgr Fahy with Black Studies faculty
Monsignor Fahy with the leadership of the Black Studies Program, Newark Star Ledger, April 21, 1975

communal reading of the text as an activist performance practice. The point of the project is to position the text and its ethos as a cultural imprint on our collective memory. To me, Fahy is a white anti-racist abolitionist ancestor who risked and used his power to benefit others. Social justice is a term we’re hearing a lot. What is it? How do you define it? What does it look like? Everyone will have a different answer. I define it as: righting a wrong. If it doesn’t right a wrong, it is not justice. Not only did Fahy leverage his power to right a wrong with some of the most impactful undertakings of Seton Hall’s history but he acknowledged the problem. Often, we rush to solutions without first doing the self interrogation to name the problem. He used this moment, his inaugural address, when everyone was listening and we’re still listening 50 years later. 

The video, this collective recitation, brings many voices together for one message. Faculty and students, separate, but together. It carves a lineage. There are protests now as there were 50 years ago. In the streets and on our campus. 

Greg Iannarella offers insight into what moved him to gravitate toward one of the most unwavering parts of Fahy’s speech, “This section always felt really powerful to me. The description, the intentional language, invoking real scenes and real communities, conjuring the people! It’s a moment where he turns the gaze outward and challenges the audience to see what is relevant.”

Participants were encouraged to think about their location as a backdrop. These choices offer additional meaning and subtext. Virtual performance lets us become our own set designers. Brooke Duffy presented her portion outside of a new school. “It is a public elementary school in Teaneck that was recently renamed for Theodora Smiley Lacey, a civil rights activist, ‘living legend.’ The NorthJersey.com website describes, ‘it was because of her efforts that Teaneck became the first city in the United States to voluntarily integrate its public schools.’”

Program of Monsignor Fahy's Inaugural Address
Program of Monsignor Fahy’s Inaugural Address, October 14, 1970, from the Priest Vertical Files held by the Archdiocese of Newark, Box 24.

This isn’t the last we’ll hear of Fahy’s address. Jon Radwan describes a new participatory oral history project designed to ensure access, inclusion, and equity in its research process to document and preserve the entirety of this part of the University’s history. “We are confident that the Inaugural Address is only the beginning of learning about Msgr. Fahy’s social justice leadership. Our recent proposal to the New Jersey Council for the Humanities seeks funding for a large scale oral history project. We plan to contact alumni, faculty, and administrators who worked closely with Fahy to record their stories about SHU’s collaboration with Newark activists to launch the Black Studies Center.” To support this project please contact Angela Kariotis and Jon Radwan.

Centering historical figures creates their own mythology. Retrospectives are not without their limitations. But there are so few white allies to look up to for this work. Allies must dig deep, activating themselves, stepping into their consciousness. We can extend the Fahy legacy and course correct. Like 50 years ago, it is a transformative yet fragile time. We must have the will to meet it. 

Get to Know the Library Staff! Jacquelyn Deppe

Jacquelyn Deppe is a Special Collections Assistant here at Walsh Library. She works in the Msgr. William Noé Field Archives and Special Collections Center and is a jack of all trades. She works on numerous projects including helping people with their genealogy research, copy-cataloging rare books and publications, processing collections, and does the bulk of the library’s design and social media work, in addition to anything else that comes up!

How long have you been working at the library?

As a full-time employee, I’ve been working in the Archives and Special Collections Center since 2018 (2 years) but technically, I’ve been here since 2014 (6 years) when I started out as a Student Worker.

 

What was the last book you read that you really enjoyed? 

I don’t remember and to be honest, I haven’t picked up a book to read leisurely since I started my Masters of Information program at Rutgers University. Hopefully, that’ll change once I’m finished in January 2021 (fingers crossed and knock on wood) but we’ll see, I have plans to pursue a second Masters from Seton Hall University.

 

What is the best way to rest / decompress? 

Either trail running or going for long difficult hikes up mountains and/or through the woods next to streams, brooks, rivers and/or lakes and ponds that are rather lightly travelled. I have not seen a bear yet even though I have apparently walked right by them. However, I can spot other critters including little bitty lizards munching on crickets!

 

What is something most people don’t know about you? 

I work downstairs.

 

Are you a morning person or a night owl? 

Both! I can wake up a 4am and/or stay up to and well past midnight.

 

What’s one ingredient you put in everything? 

I have a very limited diet due to various food sensitivities (gluten, soy, etc.) but one ingredient I put on almost everything is cheese (even though I’m lactose intolerant)!

Online Forum: Traditional Media, Social Media, and the Polarization of the Electorate

Online Forum: Traditional Media, Social Media, and the Polarization of the Electorate

When: Monday November 30th @ 7pm on Zoom (click here to join the meeting)

This forum will address:

      • How has the shift from traditional to social media contributed to the polarization of the electorate?
      • How do social media “bubbles” contribute to this phenomenon?
      • Are there ways to counteract these trends?
      • How is belief information affected by social media?

Panelists:

      • Vin Gopal (New Jersey Senator 11th District)
      • Alex Torpey (former South Orange Village President)
      • Robert Pallitto (Professor of Political Science and Public Administration)

Moderator: Steven Schnall (South Orange Village Trustee)

All are welcome to attend.

The event will be recorded & posted here and here.

View the Online Forum Poster.

Co-sponsored by: Seton Hall University College of Arts & Sciences, Seton Hall University Libraries, The East Orange Public Library, The Maplewood Public Library, The Orange Public Library, and The South Orange Public Library.


#SHU_Libraries Homepage · Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

Faculty Resources For Streaming Media – Update

Since the start of the Fall Semester and the increase in online teaching, one question that has come up repeatedly from professors is: Can I stream content from my Netflix account in my classroom when I teach? 

Netflix

The short answer: no

However, Netflix does make available several documentaries for educational screening. Please visit our Netflix page for more information.

Reminder: #SHU_Libraries offer several ways to stream film and video!

    • AVON ( Academic Video Online) provides a comprehensive video collection, delivering more than 66,000 titles spanning the widest range of subject areas including anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more.
    • Digital Campus  offers access to over 25,000 commercial films. These films may be viewed in the classroom or through Blackboard and must be ordered by a faculty member.
    • Kanopy streams more than 26,000 films from the Criterion Collection, Great Courses, PBS, and hundreds of other producers. Faculty members can request films ranging from documentaries, indie and foreign films to classics and blockbuster movies.

To start exploring our film and video collections please visit Accessing Films at SHU.

Please Contact Prof. Gerry Shea for further information.

Streaming Platforms


#SHU_Libraries Homepage · Email · Twitter · Facebook · Instagram

 

Get to Know the Library Staff! Priscilla Tejada

Priscilla Tejada is a Circulation Clerk and has been working at Seton Hall for 17 years. She is one of the first people you see when you walk into Walsh Library’s second floor at the main desk. She first started working in Government Documents and Periodicals and then moved to the Circulation / Access Services department. Priscilla is a key member of the library team and helps to keep many of the physical library operations running. In addition to checking out books, reserves, and other library materials to students, faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni, she works with the other Access Services staff to answer questions about the library, and helps to supervise library student workers. 

We want to thank Priscilla for her hard work and share a little bit of information about her so you can get to know her better. Make sure to say “hello” the next time you visit or call the library circulation desk!

  1. What is a book that everyone should read? The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle. With so much going on in our daily lives and in the world we forget to be present with what is around us (using our 5 senses). For me, I am always thinking of the future, which is not a bad thing, but sometimes when I think of the future it tends to be worrisome. Being present and enjoying all the great things that are happening now is what we should appreciate. Like the old saying goes, “Stop and smell the roses.”
  2. What are you watching these days? Designated Survivor on Netflix.
  3. Print book or eBook? Nothing like a good ol’ physical book, turning the pages, the smell of the book. And print books don’t hurt my eyes as much as an eBooks.
  4. What is the best way to rest / decompress? Working out at the gym would be my way to decompress, I call it my ZEN! I get in a zone and all my worries are either “laid to rest” for the time being or I can get my thoughts together to better serve me. Its like a two for one. I am working out for a physical purpose, but I am also helping my mental well-being. Also, listening to music.
  5. What is your favorite spot on campus? The Green, especially if you like to people-watch.
  6. Do you have a good take-out or delivery spot you’d recommend? Master Pizza (they have 4 locations, we use the West Orange location). They have a variety of options and they also have a daily specials menu.
  7. What advice would you give to your 20-year old self? Not to stay in comfort zones for too long. Taking chances and having new experiences is what life is about even if it ends up being something we don’t like.
  8. What is your favorite app? I don’t think I have a favorite app but here are some apps I may visit daily: Amazon, Medium, Influenster, Co-Star, Pinterest , Instagram and Youtube.
  9. What is a skill you are working on mastering? Passing the NJ Real Estate Exam.
  10. What is something most people don’t know about you? I feel that rice is overrated even though I grew up eating rice and beans.
  11. What’s one ingredient you put in everything? Pepper.
  12. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with? My abuelita Alba (grandmother passed away two years ago).

Presidential Politics – Contemporary Analysis on the 2020 Election

On Monday, November 9th (5:00-7:00 p.m.)  please join SHU’s Political Science and Public Affairs faculty for an exciting online conversation about the 2020 Presidential Election and the state of the U.S. Supreme Court:

“Presidential Politics – Contemporary Analysis on the 2020 Election and Research Opportunities from 1788-Future”

Monday, November 9th (5:00-7:00 p.m.)

      • Patrick Fisher, PhD will give a statistical recap of the 2020 election as it stands as of November 9.
      • Robert Pallitto, PhD, JD will give a summary of the current status of the U.S. Supreme Court, including implications of the Amy Coney Barrett confirmation.
      • Alan Delozier, D. Litt., University Archivist will round out this panel to discuss “Research Opportunities from 1788-Future.”

To join the discussion, please register (free) here.