Commemorations in Mexican History in Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month

Treaty of Córdoba & Cessation of the Mexican War of Independence
Bicentennial Observance – 1821
~and~
Orden Hijos de America (Order of the Sons of America) & Latino Civil Rights Movement Centennial Observance – 1921


Introduction – Treaty of Córdoba & Cessation of the Mexican War of Independence

This year marks the two-hundredth anniversary marks the conclusion of the Mexican War for Independence (1810-1821) made official by the signing of the Treaty of Córdoba. This particular conflict involved the occupational forces of España and the native citizenry of Mexico which included members of the Mestizos, Zambos, and Amerindian tribes along with sympathetic Mexican-raised Spaniards who rebelled against their colonial overseers. Organized by the first rebel leader Hidalgo y Costilla, a band of revolutionaries invaded the town of Guanajuato which hosted a Spanish-operated central mining center on September 15, 1810. The invasion proved successful, and this date has since become known as Mexican Independence Day. This insurgency led to further skirmishes and battles over the next decade plus which illustrated the inequity found in royal rule.

There were a number of rebel setbacks as they encountered resistance from the better armed Spanish-armed colonial forces, but the Mexicans had strength in numbers featuring 80,000 troops to 14,000 for the Spaniards. By 1813 positive strides were made in terms of geographical and strategic movement when the key cities of Oaxaca and Acapulco were captured by the rebel forces. Inspired by these successes, a “Solemn Act of Declaration of the Declaration of Independence of Northern America” was drafted that served as an important foundation document in the historical evolution of Mexico and her independence that same year.

Armed fortunes turned during the Siege of Cuautla in 1815 when the tide of conflict successes changed as governmental issues both within Mexico and abroad helped to weaken the ruling regime. Thereafter, a series of local and sporadic attacks ultimately led to victory by the native population of Mexico and the conclusion of Spanish rule altogether on August 24, 1821.

Information Resources Seton Hall University Libraries (SHU Search)

Internet & Related Sources (Selected List)

Mexican War of Independence (Texas Historical Society)
https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/mexican-war-of-independence

Mexican War of Independence (Timeline)
https://www.timetoast.com/timelines/mexican-war-of-independence–2

Mexican War of Independence (Library of Congress)
https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/mexican-revolution-and-the-united-states/independence-from-spain.html

Mexican War of Independence (Wayback Machine / Texas A&M University Site)
https://web.archive.org/web/20070816133412/http://www.tamu.edu/ccbn/dewitt/chieftains.htm

Mexican War of Independence (Map, 1810-1821)
http://www.emersonkent.com/map_archive/mexico_1810.htm

Mexican War of Independence (Hathi Trust)
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ls?field1=ocr;q1=mexican%20independence;a=srchls;lmt=ft

Treaty of Córdoba (World History Project)
https://worldhistoryproject.org/1821/8/24/treaty-of-cordoba-is-signed-establishing-mexicos-independence-from-spain

Treaty of Córdoba and Other Relevant Documents (Wayback Machine / Texas A&M University Site)
https://web.archive.org/web/20090826173709/http://www.tamu.edu/ccbn/dewitt/iguala.htm#cordova

Treaty of Córdoba (Copy of the Original Document – 1821)
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tratados_de_C%C3%B3rdoba.JPG


Introduction – Orden Hijos de America (Order of the Sons of America) & Latino Civil Rights Movement

The Orden Hijos de América (Order of the Sons of America) was founded in San Antonio, Texas on October 13, 1921. In the process the 37 individuals who formed this group were part of the first formal Mexican American civil rights organization active within that state. Their primary mission was to achieve fair access to education, housing opportunities, fair labor wages, and having all the rights outlined within the American Constitution. Additional members would join this movement that expanded into the hundreds as the organization was restricted solely to United States citizens of Mexican or Spanish extraction and over the age of sixteen. The Order obtained a state charter in 1922 and subsequently opened additional chapters throughout Texas.


Internet & Related Sources (Selected List)

Orden Hijos de América (Order of the Sons of America) (Texas Historical Society)
https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/order-of-sons-of-america

Orden Hijos de América (Order of the Sons of America) (Timeline)
https://time.graphics/event/2313938

Orden Hijos de América (Order of the Sons of America) (Wikipedia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Sons_of_America


Contact Us

Our reference librarians are glad to assist with specific works and additional information (along with refreshing links) along with Spanish or English translations as needed. Additional resources on all aspects of the Latino experience are also available for consultation and information sharing. Please feel free to reach out and setup a research appointment via the following link – https://library.shu.edu/library/research-appointments found on the University Libraries Homepage or for unique primary source materials via the Monsignor William Noé Field Archives & Special Collections Center.

Thank you in advance for your interest!

Credits

This bibliographical guide was produced in conjunction Seton Hall University Hispanic Heritage Committee under the direction of Dr. Omayra Arocho, Head of the Joseph A. Unanue Latino Institute – https://www.shu.edu/latino-institute/
by Alan Delozier, D.Litt. with support from Professor Lisa DeLuca, Professor Brooke Duffy, Dr. Sarah Ponichtera, and Dr. Lisa Rose-Wiles.

 

 

Special Collections Receives $19,872 Grant from New Jersey Historical Commission

The Monsignor William Noe Field Archives and Special Collections has received a grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission to process its collections documenting Irish immigrant history. The project, titled “Irish Immigrant Solidarity in New Jersey, 1870-Present,” will organize and preserve an enormous collection of papers donated to the archives by John Concannon, the historian of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians, as well as three smaller collections: records of the Montclair chapter of the Knights of Columbus, the papers of James McFarland which document the activities of the Trenton branch of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians, and the records of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians from Bergen County and Rahway. These records build on Seton Hall’s long history of engagement with Irish American culture to illustrate the communal bonds that supported these immigrants as they built new lives in America. Immigrant history is a particular strength of Seton Hall’s Special Collections, and this grant will assist the archives in the preservation of this history for future generations, as well as sharing it with students and faculty today.

The Library’s After Hours Study Space Returns!

We are pleased to announce the re-opening of the After Hours Study Space on Monday, August 30!

The room is adjacent to Dunkin’ Donuts on the library’s 2nd floor:Photo of After Hours Study Space door

How it works:

During the library’s regular hours, the room is open and available for all to use, with entrance/exit only from within the library through the wooden door.

During the library’s overnight hours

        • midnight thru 8am Monday – Friday
        • midnight Friday thru 9am Saturday
        • 5pm Saturday thru 11am Sunday
        • midnight Sunday thru 8am Monday

—the room is accessible only to current SHU students, with entrance/exit from outside the library via the card swipe door located on the walkway:Photo oPhoto of exterior door card swipe readerf exterior door card swipe reader

In addition, Dunkin’ Donuts will be open 24/7 from Monday-Friday, closing at 1am Saturday and Sunday, starting Monday, August 30, so students can travel from one space to the other!

Reminder to wear your mask whenever you are inside the library or the After Hours Study Space!

Mabel Wong Honored for 30 Years of Exceptional Service

Mabel A. Wong’s friendly and familiar face has been seen at Walsh Library since it opened in 1994. Mabel, the Walsh Library Circulation Supervisor, received her 30-year Seton Hall service award in March. The original ceremony was postponed last year due to the pandemic and held on Teams this year. Associate Vice President for Human Resources, Michael Silvestro, presented the service award to Mabel. University President, Dr. Joseph Nyre, also spoke at the event. Mabel was presented with a certificate and a pin to commemorate her 30 years of service to the University. Mabel has “a whole collection of pins” for each milestone year she has served at Seton Hall. Mabel was also awarded the McQuaid Medal for Distinguished Service in 2010.

Mabel, the longest tenured employee at Walsh Library, started as a circulation clerk at McLaughlin Library in April of 1989. McLaughlin Library preceded the Walsh Library on the South Orange Campus. Mabel said, “I think back to when I started and it’s a world of difference.” There was no automated circulation system and the circulation staff used punch cards to check books out. Mabel also typed out overdue notices that were sent out by mail. The circulation desk was busier because reserves were available only in print and the ten microfilm machines always had people waiting to use them. Mabel thinks things are better now because the library provides easier access to more information. The best part of the job for Mabel is talking to the students. She is still in touch through Facebook with students she knew from McLaughlin Library. Thank you to Mabel for her exceptional and dedicated service. We hope to see her friendly face at the Walsh Library circulation desk for years to come!

Photo of service pins for 10, 15, 25, and 30 years
Service pins for 10, 15, 25, and 30 years.

 

New Research Procedures in Special Collections

Starting in the Fall semester of 2021, the Archives and Gallery (Special Collections) will operate out of a single reception space at the front desk of Walsh Gallery. Here’s the entrance to Walsh Gallery:

Walsh Gallery Entrance

Visitors looking for both archival and museum materials, as well as individuals with appointments in the department, or researchers looking for rare books or Archdiocesan materials will come here to be directed to where they need to go. Here’s the reception desk:

Gallery Welcome Desk

The Archives Reading Room will remain open by appointment only.  Researchers needing to consult with archival documents or view museum objects will be able to make an appointment to see materials.  The Archives Reading Room will also continue to host classes incorporating archival materials.  Additionally, events centered around Seton Hall’s museum and archives collections may take place in the Reading Room.

Welcome back to campus!  We look forward to seeing you during the 2021-2022 academic year!

University Mask Mandate Extended

Indoor Mask Requirement Extended Until Further Notice

The existing indoor mask requirement, originally announced on July 29, is being extended until further notice. All individuals (vaccinated and unvaccinated) are required to wear a mask at all indoor, nonresidential, on-campus University settings, except when alone or dining [details].

When visiting Walsh Library, you must wear a face mask covering your nose and mouth, at all times.

Library Hours for the 2021 Fall Semester

#SHU_Libraries welcomes new and returning students!

~ The Library is open 7 days a week during the semester ~

**2021 Fall Semester Hours begin on Monday, August 30th**

Monday, August 30th — Tuesday, November 23rd    
Sunday                       11am – midnight
Monday – Friday       8am – midnight
Saturday                     9am – 5pm


Thanksgiving Recess
Wednesday, November 24th — Saturday, November 27th CLOSED


Sunday, November 28th — Sunday, December 5th     
Sunday                       11am – midnight
Monday – Friday       8am – midnight
Saturday                     9am – 5pm


Final Exam Hours
Monday, December 6th — Friday, December 10th     8am – 3am
Saturday, December 11th     9am – midnight
Sunday, December 12th     11am – midnight


Open 24/7
8am Monday, December 13th — 11pm Tuesday, December 21st


Wednesday, December 22nd
8am – 5pm


Christmas Recess
Thursday, December 23rd — Wednesday, January 3rd, 2022 CLOSED

Fall 2021 Hours [printable pdf]

E-ZBorrow is getting an EZ-ier interface!

We’re excited to let you know that E-ZBorrow, the service that allows us to borrow over millions of books held at our 50+ partnering institutions is getting a makeover! Soon you will see a new and improved search interface, allowing users to more easily browse, find, and request materials!

Here’s the new interface:

E-Z Borrow Search Interface

When will this happen?

On Thursday, August 12th we will switch over to the new system.

What’s different?

During the initial rollout, you will use your SHU shortname (e.g. bidenjoe) to request materials. Here’s the login screen:

E-Z Borrow Login Screen

 

What will be the same?

Although the underlying technology is changing, the key benefits of the E-ZBorrow service remain the same. You can still check out books from any one of our 60+ university and research library partners around our region with the same speed, efficiency and convenience that EZBorrow has always provided!

Why the change?

We and our partners have developed a new system that leverages the latest library technology. The system will be more powerful than the current tool we use.

All of this gives you world-class access to library collections that will only improve going forward!

Questions? Contact us!

Although we aim to make this transition as smoothly as possible, we expect there will be questions.  Please reach out to any of our librarians or staff via our chat reference or at our Circulation Desk (973-761-9435 | circulation@shu.edu)!

Get to Know the Library Staff! Elizabeth Leonard

Elizabeth Leonard is the Assistant Dean of Information Technologies and Collection Services. Her fantastic team runs “the back of the house,” managing the online library and ensuring that electronic and digital materials are findable and accessible. 

1. How long have you been working at the library?
I’ve been working at Seton Hall since 2013.

2. What is a book that everyone should read?
Any book that brings them enjoyment. I have no patience with the idea that folks need to read something because everyone else is, or because someone said it is a “must read.” Reading should be a pleasure, like the smell of spring flowers or a hug from a friend.

3. What music are you listening to these days?
Not music—I’ve been listening to podcasts, mostly. Hidden Brain (Science/psychology), Amended (stories of women who fought racism, classism, and xenophobia), OnBeing (conversations about spirituality, science, social healing, and the arts).

4. Last music concert you attended?
Facebook live streamed concert of the Indigo Girls.

5. What is your favorite spot on campus? 
Currently, I love to walk past the peony plants on the path leading to the entrance of the Dining Hall. Those are my favorite flowers.

6. Do you have a good take-out or delivery spot you’d recommend? 
A colleague and I love to go to Jackie and Son. They have great, fresh food!

7. What is your favorite app? 
Probably the New York Times Crossword app. I do the crossword everyday.

8. What is a skill you are working on mastering? 
Not interrupting. I’ve been working on it my whole life (unsuccessfully). My brain generally moves at warp speed and my mouth forgets that it isn’t supposed to join in!

9. What is something most people don’t know about you? 
I spent three years living in Germany, working for the Department of Defense. (Please don’t ask me to speak German anymore; I’ve forgotten most of it!)

10. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with?
Ruth Bader Ginsburg or Eleanor Roosevelt.