American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

by Chelsea BarrettChelsea Barrett

The 2021 ALA Midwinter Conference which took place virtually January 22-26 was full of amazing presentations and presenters! There were engaging talks, revelations and roundtables focusing on various areas of librarianship, on topics ranging from antiracism and women’s suffrage to algorithmic bias and gaming. Some of the talks included high-profile names such as Ziggy Marley, Ruby Bridges, Dr. Jill Biden, Ibrahm X. Kendi, and the late, great Cicely Tyson. Here are a few highlights from conference: 

Friday, January 22 

Natalie Baszile 

Bazile, the author of the book “Queen Sugar” which has since been made into a television series, spoke on the desire to shift the narrative on agriculture, farming, and labor. In her new book “We are Each Other’s Harvest”, Bazile discusses land ownership and land stewardship from a nonfiction lens, seeking to include the complicated history of black farmers and agriculture into the perception of farming and land. This was an engaging talk steeped in history and cultural context which makes her new book must-read. 

Recommended Read: We Are Each Other’s Harvest: Celebrating African American Farmers, Land, and Legacy 


Ruby Bridges 

Civil rights activist Ruby Bridges, spoke of her new book “This is Your Time” which speaks on her experience as the first black student in a desegregated elementary school, all at the age of 6 years old. In the telling of her story, Bridges speaks on how her recently passed mother gave her the determination, inspiration, and strength to get through the hateful and impassioned situation she was placed. Some of the pertinent themes were the protection of Bridges innocence by her parents as well as the protection and support given to Bridges by one of her white, female teachers. This was a very inspired talk and alludes to the deep messages embedded in this work. 

Recommended Read: “This is Your Time” 


Saturday, January 23 

Ibrahm X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain 

#1 New York Times bestselling author Ibrahm X. Kendi and award-winning historian, professor and writer Keisha N. Blain discussed a new book they both co-edited titled “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”. This work involved the bringing together of 80 black writers to write about the history of community, regardless of gender, immigration, and other factors. Of the 80 different writers, who wrote 5 years of African American history (400 years), there are10 poets who wrote poems as interludes In the process of writing this book, the writers not only reflected history but also made history in the process.  

Recommended Read: “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”


Ziggy Marley 

Eight-time Grammy Award winner, author, philanthropist, and reggae icon Ziggy Marley spoke at the ALA Conference and shared two up and coming books— “My Dog Romeo” and “Music is in Everything”. He explained that many of the ideas for these books came from encounters with nature and his children, showing the organic nature of his thought process. If that was not enough of a treat, Ziggy Marley then proceeded to grace us with a musical performance of Music is in Everything! These children’s books are ones to place on your shelves! 

Recommended Reads:  “My Dog Romeo”       

  “Music is in Everything” 


Sunday, January 24 

Cicely Tyson 

It was an honor to hear the legendary Cicely Tyson speak at the ALA Midwinter Conference, 4 days before her passing. Throughout her illustrious career she has taken on roles which served a purpose to her personal philosophy on advocating for Black women and promoting positivity in the midst of a tortured history. During her talk, Mrs. Tyson spoke on the release of her autobiography “Just As I Am: A Memoir”, a timely release for such a sensational woman. She spoke on her experience as an actress, highlighting issues for Black women actresses, economic issues that impacted the industry and offered inspirational and enlightening advice to the audience. She spoke with an earnest tone, wanting to uplift those who read her memoir to not be swayed by her experiences but rather motivated to combat these challenges and rise above any obstacle life may bring. Again, it was an honor to hear Mrs. Tyson speak and it is a privilege that her legacy lives on in her wonderful memoir. 

Recommended Read: “Just As I Am: A Memoir 


Ian Kitajima

Ian Kitajima, the Oceanit Director of Corporate Development, “Corporate Intrapreneur of the Year” (2017) and “Social Impact Enterprise of the Year(2018) spoke on Artificial Intelligence as it currently exists and the implications of AI going forward. One of the highlights of this talk was the presentation of a video which showed a Google Assistant making an actual haircut appointment for the user in real-time! It was using Google Duplex which is something that may be worth exploring. There was also talk of the changing landscape where data can be a superpower skill for students and the overall community. Other examples shown were how Artificial Intelligence can be used to measure social distancing by honing into how far apart people are from one another and a video game where the person is the controller. Clearly, the world of AI is continuing to grow and as Mr. Kitajima pointed out, we must evolve with it! 

Recommended Viewing: SHU Libraries Data Ethics and Literacy Guide 


Monday, January 25 

Dr. Jill Biden 

The closing speaker for the conference was First Lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, a lifelong educator, community college professor, author, and advocate for the rights and welfare of women, girls, and people with disabilities. During her talk she focused on the importance of reading and learning, specifically homing in on her love of reading and the joy and beauty found in books. Dr. Biden stated that loving to read means loving to learn and through that learning process comes connection, understanding, compassion and wisdom from those who came before us. Through learning, who we are and who we can become are revealed and what a better place to discover yourself than within a library! Libraries fulfil a purpose as a place of information for all, a place for community and a place where expertise and education are offered. Utilize this space for exploration and develop critical information skills and you will be on your way! 

Recommended Reads:  

Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself 

JOEY: The Story of Joe Biden

For more information on up-and-coming events, please continue to visit this blog and follow @SHU_Libraries on Instagram and Twitter  

 

 

 

SHU Celebrates Women’s History Month with the West Indian Student Organization (WISO)

In honor of Women’s History Month, the Walsh Library partnered with SHU’s West Indian Student Organization (WISO) for the second iteration of WISO Reads! We are excited to highlight Caribbean authors and provide an associated list of reading recommendations. A large and hearty thank you to Ijah Penn, the treasurer of SHU WISO for the extensive work she put into compiling these resources!

    1. Zelma “Zee” Edgell is Belizean born American author. She was born in Belize City, British Honduras now known as Belize. Edgell studied journalism at the school of modern languages at the Polytechnic of Central London and continued her education at the University of the West Indies. From 1981 to 1987, she served at the first Director of the Women’s Bureau in the Government of Belize and later became the Director of the Department of Women’s Affairs. She spent several years living in places such as Jamaica, Nigeria, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Somalia working with Peace Corps to provide aid to such countries. She passed away on December 20th, 2020.

Recommended Read:

        • Edgell’s debut Novel, Beka Lamb (1982), showcases the early years of the nationalist movement in British Honduras (Belize) from the eyes of a growing and maturing teenage girl named Beka Lamb. The book deals with and discusses social insecurity, racial prejudice, educational pressures, societal pressures, poverty, and the influence of conservatism on womanhood and freedom. The novel also discusses the struggle of being a woman in Belize due to the result of the social, governmental, and societal struggles Belize had place upon them. Edgell goes into detail focusing on the process of womanhood in the development from childhood to young adulthood.
    1. Erna Brodber is a Jamaican writer, sociologist, and social activist. She has established herself as a major voice in Caribbean literature through her narratives drawing upon the experience of the oral and scribal traditions of the African diaspora, mixing modernist literature with folk tales. Brodber was born in Saint Mary Parish, Jamaica. She received her BA from University College of the West Indies, followed by earning her MSc and PhD with a predoctoral fellowship in psychiatric anthropology. Brodber became a sociology lecturer and researcher at the Institute for Social and Economic Research in the University of the West Indies where she collected several oral histories of the elders in rural Jamaica. She challenges western ways of ordering the world and resurrects myth and tradition in order to provide those rehabilitation form the lost of ancestry and psychic damage due to slavery and colonialism.

Recommended Reads:

        • Myal (1988) is a novel that explores the link between people of two areas of the black diaspora, the Afro-Americans, and the Afro-Jamaicans. The story is of a women’s cultural and spiritual struggle in colonial Jamaica.
        • Jane and Louisa Will Soon Come Home (1980) is a book that reflects an internal sociological perspective that takes readers on a journey. Broder breaks down the life of Nellie, the main narrator, into vignettes that explore the complexity of Nellie’s childhood, sexuality, and search for identity under the circumstances of Jamaica and colonial legacy.
        • Nothing’s Mat (2014) is a story told by a young black British teenager as she navigates life and the topic of family history and comments on anthropological methodology as well as the African system of thought.
    1. Paule Marshall is an American-born novelist with emigrant parents from Barbados. She is very well known for writing very telling narratives of Caribbean communities within America. After going to school to be a social worker, she changed course, majored in English Literature, and then began to write. She is very well known for encouraging Black identity from an Afrocentric perspective, detailing a coming-of-age motif in many of her works.

Recommended Read:

        • Brown Girl, Brownstone (1959) is a novel about a young girl named Selina Boyce growing up in a small black immigrant community where she is caught between her mother who wants to conform to the ideals of new home and participate in making the American Dream into a reality while her father longs to go back to the security of his home in Barbados. The themes this story discusses are travel, migration, and the need to find belonging or wholeness within a community.
    1. Nicole Dennis-Benn is a Jamaican novelist best known for her debut novel, Here Comes the Sun, which earned the title “Best Book of the Year” by the New York Times. Dennis-Benn was born and raised in Kingston Jamaica. She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Master of Public Heath from the University of Michigan and an MFA in Creative Writing from Sarah Lawrence College. Dennis-Benn is a founder of the Stuyvesant Writing Workshop. Dennis-Benn in her novel discusses the conservatism of Jamaica as her characters struggle with their forbidden love for another of the same sex, this is relative to her life as Dennis-Been identifies as queer and is currently married with her wife in Brooklyn, New York.

Recommended Reads:

        • Here Comes the Sun (2017), is a novel that explores the world hidden among the pristine beaches of Jamaica. A young girl by the name of Margot, hustles by trading to send her sister Thandi to school. The story talks about forbidden love, the violent social consequence of same-sex love within a small community, the very real and pressing struggles of poverty and the complexities both social and economic, of commercial development in the Caribbean.
        • Patsy (2019) is a novel that takes a look at motherhood, immigration, and sacrifice. It is a story of a woman and her two daughters fighting for survival in their drought-stricken Jamaican town as it takes a powerful look at issues of poverty, colorism, and homophobia in Jamaica.
    1. Oonya Kempadoo is a novelist born in the United Kingdom from parents of Guyanese lineage though she grew up in Guyana. Kempadoo works freelance as a researcher and consultant in the arts, private sector with youth and international organization focusing on social development. She is also the co-founder of the Grenada Community Library and Resource Center and served as a National juror for the Scholastic Arts & Writing Awards 2019-2020.

Recommended Reads:

        • Buxton Spice (1997) is a story of a young girl’s growing sexual awareness and sexuality in the multi-racial society of Guyana disintegrating under a corrupt government.
        • Tide Running (2001) is set in Tobago as an account of young couple as it raises question about relationships, wealth, responsibility, racial, cultural and class differences. Additionally, the novel takes a look at the predicament of a young society in Tobago that looks to America for fantasies and heroes and not reality.
      1. Esmeralda Santiago is a prominent Puerto Rican author in the United States. She writes memoirs that encapsulate her own assimilation into this American culture and way of life, which allow others with similar experiences to relate and feel represented. Her writing showcases themes of self-discovery, immigration, working-class immigrant experience and biculturalism.

Recommended Read:

        • When I was Puerto Rican (1994) is a memoir about author Esmerelda Santiago and her story. She speaks of her journey during her early years in Puerto Rico, her travels to New York and many highlights along the way, including her receiving high honors at Harvard. This work emphasizes Santiago’s experience with assimilating in order to feel represented, both as a woman and as one who migrated from another country trying to find her identity in a sea of adversity.

Please continue to visit our blog for more instances of WISO Reads and other reading recommendations.

To get involved with SHU WISO or learn more about their organization, follow their Instagram page: shu_wiso

Follow the hashtags #caribbeanreads #WISOReads

Women’s History Month – The Period Movement @ SHU

This Women’s History Month, Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to work with The Period Movement @ SHU to highlight items in our collection that intersect with their mission to end period poverty and stigmas around menstruation.

Their collection can be found at https://library.shu.edu/2021dislays/whm

Interested in reading these items? The items in this book display are mostly eBooks which can be read anywhere, the physical items can be placed on hold.

Want to learn more about this group or join them?

The Period Movement @ SHU fights to end period poverty and stigmas through service, education, and advocacy. We aim to serve menstruators in the populated communities around us, especially those who are not fortunate enough to have access to sanitary products. We recognize that menstruation is a burden to many, causing financial strains as well as reproductive health problems that are not widely taught in school. Along with these burdens, there are many cultural and societal stigmas that are not widely acknowledged and instead kept behind closed doors. Every menstruator should feel encouraged to discuss their personal experiences with the world, slowly changing the taboo mentality that society today holds towards reproductive health. In order to normalize open conversation about menstruation, we aim to use our chapter to encourage discussion in our own community, starting right here on campus. Our club is about serving the communities around us, including women and students in cities such as South Orange, Newark, and even New York City.

In order to get involved, please contact Period Movement:

Get to Know the Library Staff! Victor Eubanks

Victor Eubanks is the Institutional Repository Coordinator. If you are faculty and have a Selected Works profile, he probably keeps it up to date. He started as a Catalog Assistant 17 years ago, entering library materials into the system. Now, he ensures that the information in the various categories of the erepository is correct and easily accessible.

Victor Eubanks

  1. How long have you been working at the library? 17 years.
  2. What is a book that everyone should read? Non-fiction: Year 501 by Noam Chomsky | Fiction: John Dies at the End by David Wong.
  3. What are you watching these days? 2 Sentence Horror Stories, Desus & Mero, Snowfall, just to name a few.
  4. Last music concert you attended? Immortal Technique .
  5. What is the best way to rest / decompress? On a day off, sleep until I wake up naturally, then go to a record store.
  6. What is your favorite spot on campus? The tables by the student center.
  7. Do you have a good take-out or delivery spot you’d recommend? Munchies, a great Jamaican restaurant in S. Orange.
  8. What advice would you give to your 20-year old self? Go on more road trips. It’s the best way to see the country
  9. What is your favorite app? Youtube. There is so much history. Speeches and interviews that I never heard or saw.
  10. What is a skill you are working on mastering? I’ll have to get back to you on that one!
  11. What is something most people don’t know about you? All of the different types of music that I like.
  12. What’s one ingredient you put in everything? Cayenne pepper.
  13. What person living or dead would you like to have dinner with? My grandfather. He passed away before I was born.

 

Seton Hall University Libraries Celebrate Open Education Week 2021

Open Education Week will take place this year from Monday, March 1st — Friday, March 5th. Started in 2012, Open Education Week is an opportunity to share and learn about the latest achievements in open education. Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with intellectual property licenses that facilitate the free use, adaptation and distribution of resources” (UNESCO, 2019).

To coincide with Open Education Week, University Libraries is sponsoring several events:

1. Wednesday, March 3rd from 12:30pm – 1:30pm the Center for Faculty Development is presenting an online workshop — Reducing Book Costs for Students with Open Educational Resources — co-sponsored with Seton Hall University Libraries. At this workshop, Seton Hall librarians will explain the benefits of OER, demonstrate how library resources can help bring down the cost of textbooks, and provide faculty with practical tools and resources for using open textbooks in their courses. To join the workshop click here.

2. Thursday, March 4th from 3:00pm – 4:00pm join us for a roundtable discussion on the benefits and challenges of integrating open educational resources, open textbooks and/or library e-resources in your courses. If you have had experience with open materials or are interested in learning more about them, we would love to hear from you. This event is open to faculty, administrators and students – come and be heard! To join the discussion on Teams click here.

3. Friday, March 5th @ 10:30 TLTC is hostinga virtual session Leveraging Open Educational Resources. Explore the wide range of Open Educational Resources (OER) that reside in the public domain and are free to use for teaching and learning. Register here.

4. Friday, March 5th from 10:00am-12pm, then 1:00pm-3:00pm Seton Hall Librarians will provide virtual office hours for anyone who has questions about OER. Feel free to meet with:

Prof. Gerry Shea (Communication Librarian)
10:00am-12pm Join on Teams

Prof. Kyle Downey (Nursing/Heath Science Librarian)
1:00pm-3:00pm Join on Teams

Prof. Lisa Rose-Wiles (Science Librarian)
10:00am-12pm Join on Teams
1:00pm-3:00pm Join on Teams


Want to learn more about OER?
Reach out to Prof. Gerry Shea | Explore our OER Research Guide here

Seton Hall University Libraries Joins HathiTrust

Seton Hall University Libraries has become the newest member of HathiTrust (www.hathitrust.org), a global collaborative of research and academic libraries working towards its mission to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future.

Today, HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.

HathiTrust members steward this collection under the aims of scholarly, not corporate, interests. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community. This offers an unprecedented opportunity to steward the cultural record through increasingly interdependent work that develops capacity and sparks innovation.

Authorized Seton Hall University constituents can access Hathi Trust with their PirateNet credentials here.

For more information, see 2021 HathiTrust At-a-Glance [pdf]

February Speaker’s Series Event

#SHU_Libraries is pleased to announce the next event in our Speaker’s Series: Critical Issues in Information and Education—

“Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools.” 

***View a recording of the event here***

When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 (4:00-5:15pm)

About Our Speakers: 

Image of Elaina Norlin

Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). In her role, Ms. Norlin develops and expands ASERL’s Professional Development programming, including the development of new activities to advance ASERL’s goals for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). “As the ASERL Professional Development/DEI Coordinator, I’m passionate about transforming workplace organizations from dysfunctional to a place everyone feels valued, respected and honored for their unique and special contributions to the organization.”

For ten years, Ms. Norlin served as Executive Director of the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, overseeing significant programmatic growth and community outreach activities. She previously worked for OCLC, the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the University of Arizona.

In addition, Ms. Norlin works closely with leaders and educators to develop, implement, and assess programs that support diversity, equity, and inclusion, employee engagement, institutional growth, and workplace culture.

Ms. Norlin earned her Bachelor of Arts in Communications (Advertising) from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, her Master of Library and Information Science is also from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  

Image of John Kummings

J. Kenyon Kummings is the Superintendent for Wildwood Public Schools (WPS). Mr. Kummings has served as the Superintendent for WPS since 2014. Prior to assuming that role he was the elementary school principal for seven years. WPS has a high percentage of economically disadvantaged students and is racially and ethnically diverse. The district is unique in that it continuously has one of the highest percentages of students living in poverty in the state of New Jersey (50%). WPS is the only P-12 Urban district in Cape May County and has been fine tuned to meet the needs of its students given that its demographic consists of large populations of special education students (24%), and English Language Learners (35% Pre-K to 8thGrade).

Mr. Kummings has testified several times before the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and most recently before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools regarding the recruitment of minority education candidates.  His testimony from that day along with the expert testimony of representatives of Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s) identified that there are systemic barriers to entering EPP’s, many of which are attributed to standardized assessments that are leading to inequitable outcomes.  

Mr. Kummings earned his Bachelor of Arts from Rutgers University, his Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey, and is currently working on a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Rowan University.

Library Launches New Qualitative Data Analysis Software for University Community

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to announce the purchase of a limited number of qualitative data analysis software Atlas.ti (desktop, version 9), and ATLAS.ti Cloud licenses. Atlas.ti (desktop) software supports coding textual, graphical, audio, or video data; managing and annotating a literature review; and creating data visualizations or network diagrams. Atlas.ti cloud is used primarily for text documents and supports collaborative access to shared projects.

Lynn CarrSociology Professor C. Lynn Carr notes: “I love Atlas.ti! I don’t know how I’d do qualitative research with large amounts of data without data management software. Atlas.ti is easy to use for coding data and organizing it. It’s largely intuitive. I find it indispensable for data analysis, assisting me in envisioning relationships among categories as they emerge from the data. In the writing stage, it allows me to easily find the quotes I need.”

Seton Hall University Libraries wishes to acknowledge that this purchase would not have been possible without funding support via special faculty development grants and wishes to extend a thank you to the Office of the Provost. Additionally, SHU’s Department of Information Technology assisted in facilitating the licensing of this software.

How to request and install Atlas.ti?

To request a copy of Atlas.ti use the Atlas.ti request form from SHU Libraries Data Services.

For help with Atlas.ti please contact SHU Libraries Data Services:
https://library.shu.edu/data-services | data.services@shu.edu

Black History Month at the Libraries and Beyond

There are so many ways to get involved and educate yourself for Black History Month (BHM) this February, and beyond. Walsh Library is pleased to partner with and promote events for BHM with various departments and committees across campus, including: Africana Studies and History departments, several Black Student Organizations, and committees.

See a list of BHM events university-wide.

Attend a Library BHM Event

Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics (Wednesday, February 10, 2021 | 2:00pm-3:00pm) Register 

Massive amounts of data, often personal data, are used and gathered in more and more technologies. With that comes the need for data ethics to become better established and understood. Data can be used in helpful and innovative ways, but it can also be used against people and communities, particularly communities of color. Come join us in an introductory discussion of this topic.

Douglass Day Conversation (Friday, February 12, 2021 | 5:30pm-6:30pm) Register 

Celebrate the legacy of Frederick Douglass with mini-lectures by Africana Studies and History faculty about Douglass, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells, and more. Members of SHU Black Student Organizations will help facilitate discussions. We will end with information about how you can contribute to Black feminist scholarship by transcribing the papers of Mary Church Terrell.

Seton Hall University Libraries Speaker’s Series (Wednesday, February 24, 2021 | 4:00pm-5:15pm) Register

      • “Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools”
      • Join guest speakers Elaine Norlin (Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries) and  J. Kenyon Kummings (the Superintendent for New Jersey’s Wildwood Public Schools)  for an engaging discussion on diversity.

#BHM365

Learning about Black history shouldn’t end when February is over. Keep Black History Month going year-round by continuing to educate yourself. Here are some sources to help you:

Art & Visual Culture
The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall has a long history of hosting exhibitions on Black culture. Take a glance through some of these materials pulled together by Gallery Director Jeanne Brasile.

Follow Seton Hall University Libraries on social media for BHM updates and much more!

Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

Love Data Week 2021

Seton Hall University Libraries’ new Data Services Group, is excited to invite the SHU Community to Love Data Week 2021, to be held virtually February 8th-12th .

Love Data Week (LDW) is an international celebration of data, aiming to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services.

Follow ❤ Love Data Week ❤ online at #lovedataweek21

This year’s LDW theme at SHU is “Diversity and Inclusion in Data”. We want to support the SHU community with our data subscriptions (such as ICPSR and PolicyMap) and open source tools to promote finding data related to marginalized communities and BIPOC (black, Indigenous and people of color), and visualizing the information using impartial and fair methods. Programs range from a conversation about Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics, Using PowerBI to identify diversity in your workplace, and finding thematic and minority data collections in ICPSR (Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research).

All are encouraged to learn about Research Data Services now offered by University Libraries, including how to create a data management plan and data storage options with University Libraries. This new offering will help faculty when applying for grants and teach researchers how to manage, preserve and store data for reuse.

Faculty who are unable to attend these sessions can have them delivered during scheduled class time for their students. Make arrangements through your liaison librarian.

Join a session (or a few!) on Microsoft Teams and get connected.

The full schedule and registration is below:

Monday, February 8, 2021

    • R: ggplot (11:00am – 12:00pm)
    • Presenter: Samah Alshrief
    • Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

    • Using PowerBI to Identify Diversity in Your Workplace (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Chelsea Barrett
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

    • Using Excel to Build an Optimal Investment Portfolio  (3:00pm – 3:45pm)
    • Presenter: Prof.  Anthony Loviscek
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

    • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Data Sources in ICPSR (11:00am-12:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Gerry Shea
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

    • Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenters: Prof. Chelsea Barrett & Prof. Brooke Duffy
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Thursday, February 11, 2021


Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Data Driven Decisions in Sports Medicine: Helping Athletes Stay Healthy, Perform Better, and Return to Play After Injury (1:00pm-2:00pm) **SORRY, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Data Narrative Assignment Workshop (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenter: Prof. Greg Iannarella
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Thursday, February 11, 2021

    • Facts & Figures Zet Forward  (2:00pm-3:00pm)
    • Presenters: Prof. Alan Delozier, Dr. Sarah Ponichtera, & Jeanne Brasile
    • Info & Registration (free) | Microsoft Teams

Friday, February 12, 2021