Dr. Chistopher Tienken Joins Zet Forward Podcast

We are happy to announce the second episode of the libraries’ new podcast series, Zet Forward, dropped in March. In the episode, Gerry Shea, Communication Librarian at Walsh Library, talks with Dr. Christopher Tienken from the College of Education & Human Services about his book The School Reform Landscape Reloaded: More Fraud, Myths, and Lies.

Dr. Tienken is an associate professor of Education Leadership, Management, and Policy at Seton Hall University in the College of Education and Human Services. He is the former editor of the American Association of School Administrators Journal of Scholarship and Practice and the current editor of the Kappa Delta Pi Record. His research interests include school reform issues such as standardization, the influence of curriculum quality on student outcomes, and the construct validity of high-stakes  standardized tests as decision-making tools. He has authored over 85 publications. His new book, with Carol Mullen, is The Risky Business of Education Policy.

You can find Dr. Tienken on Twitter @ChrisTienken and also at his website.

You can find the podcast at Podcast @ Seton Hall University. Please check it out when you have time.  

Introducing the CAPS Collection

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and Seton Hall University Libraries are proud to announce the purchase of a collection geared to promoting mental health care and wellness within our campus community. Housed in three locations – Walsh Library, the IHS Library in Nutley, and at the CAPS Office (second floor of Mooney Hall, Room 27)- the collection is designed to help encourage education around common topics of interest to students. The collection was funded by grants from Great Minds Dare to Care, a university-wide collaborative suicide prevention initiative focused on student wellness and mental health.

Topics covered across the collection include general stress management, conflict resolution, perfectionism, insomnia, anxiety, coping with chronic pain, exploring and accepting gender identity and sexuality, mental health in the context of race, body image issues, substance abuse and addiction, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These books can help give you the tools to help yourself or a friend or loved one in need if struggling with any of these issues. For a list of available titles check here.

Additionally, don’t hesitate to take advantage of CAPS counseling services. Call (973) 761-9500, Monday-Friday 8:45 a.m.- 4:45 p.m., to schedule an appointment.

If there is an immediate psychological emergency, students can call the SHU 24/7 Mental Health Crisis Hotline (973) 275-HELP (4357) for support.

University Libraries Announces New Podcast Series

We are happy to announce the first episode of the libraries’ new podcast series, Zet Forward, dropped at the beginning of February. Zet Forward is a podcast to celebrate authors and other individuals who are involved with projects for the benefit of Seton Hall University and the wider world.  In the first episode, Chelsea Barrett, Business Librarian at Walsh Library, interviews Dr. Jay Liebowitz. Dr. Liebowitz is a visiting professor in the Department of Computing and Decision Sciences at Seton Hall University. He was awarded a U.S. Navy Summer Faculty Research Fellowship at the Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division (NSWC-CD) for Summers 2020 and 2021. Professor Liebowitz, who teaches in the Stillman School of Business’ M.B.A. and online M.S. in Business Analytics programs, focused his research on developing an enterprise-wide knowledge management strategy at NSWC-CD and metrics to measure the scientific and technical health of the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-CD). The interview covered, among other topics, Dr. Liebowitz’s newest book: A Research Agenda for Knowledge Management and Analytics.

You can find the podcast at Podcast @ Seton Hall University. Please check it out when you have time.  

Library Hours for the 2022 Spring Semester

2022 Spring Semester Hours

Tuesday, January 4th — Monday, January 17th

Monday – Friday     8:00am – 5:00pm | Saturday & Sunday CLOSED
MLK Jr. Day — Monday, January 17th CLOSED 

Tuesday, January 18th-Sunday, January 30th

Monday – Friday   8:00am – 10:00pm

Saturday & Sunday   9:00am-5:00pm

REGULAR HOURS     Monday, January 31st — Friday, March 4th

Monday – Friday    8:00am – midnight
Saturday 9:00am – 5:00pm | Sunday 11:00am – midnight


SPRING BREAK     Saturday, March 5th — Saturday, March 12th

Saturday & Sunday March 5th & 6th    CLOSED
Monday, March 7th — Friday, March 11th        8:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday March 12th   CLOSED


REGULAR HOURS     Sunday, March 13th — Wednesday, April 13th

Monday – Friday 8:00am – midnight
Saturday 9:00am – 5:00pm | Sunday 11:00am – midnight


EASTER RECESS     Thursday, April 14th — Sunday April 17th CLOSED


REGULAR HOURS     Monday, April 18th — Sunday, May 1st

Monday – Friday     8:00am – midnight
Saturday     9:00am – 5:00pm | Sunday     11:00am – midnight


FINAL EXAMS     Monday, May 2nd — Sunday, May 18th

Monday – Friday     8:00am – 3:00am
Saturday     9:00am – midnight | Sunday     11:00am – midnight


OPEN 24/7     8am Monday, May 9th — 11pm Wednesday, May 18th


Thursday, May 19th — Friday, May 20th
8:00am – 5:00pm

Saturday, May 21st – Sunday, May 22nd         CLOSED
Monday, May 23rd     8:00am – 5:00pm
Tuesday, May 24th – Friday, May 27th     8:00am – 6:00pm


MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND
Saturday, May 28th — Monday, May 30th  CLOSED

Spring 2022 Hours [printable pdf]

Catching Up With Jordan Evans-Boyajian

If you’ve participated in a library instruction class, Data Services class, or used our Chat With A Librarian service this past semester, chances are you’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with Jordan Evans-Boyajian, an adjunct librarian here at Walsh Library. With her wealth of knowledge and talent for teaching Jordan habeen much in demand as an instructor. 

A native of New York, Jordan’s love of art led her to complete a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the School of Visual Arts in New York. And she has now completed her master’s degree in Library & Information Science online through San Jose State University this past November! 

Jordan started as an intern at Seton Hall University Libraries in October of 2020. Jordan initially joined our reference team. She then branched out to work on projects involving instruction, Archives & Special Collections, and the Walsh Gallery. One of her first projects was a historic online tour of the campus 

During this Fall semester at Seton Hall University, Jordan was able to coordinate several book displays virtually and in-person to celebrate Hispanic Heritage MonthLGBTQIA+ History Month, and National Native American Heritage Month. She also developed guides to help students understand how to utilize Humanitarian Mapping tools and how to use works from the Walsh Gallery in their own research.  

While working with the Archives & Special Collections in the summer of 2021, Jordan was able to complete digitizing Civil Rights photographic slides for use by the Africana Studies department. These slides were in rough condition due to decay from age, but she was able to bring them back to their original look and feel through color correction. 

Jordan observed  that “these slides document the Civil Rights Movement as well as how the Africana Studies Department has developed their curriculum through the years. It is a great look back to see what the style was in the 1970’s at Seton Hall University.” 

Jordan will be finishing up her adjunct position this month, and then it’s onward to new adventures. We thank her for the outstanding contributions she has made to the library, wish her well, and expect to hear great things in the future–À votre santé!!

First Native American Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

Image of inscribed book by Joy Harjo
Inscribed copy of She Had Some Horses by Joy Harjo in Walsh Library

Did you know that Seton Hall’s rare book collection contains poetry by Native American authors?  There is an inscribed copy of one of the early books of the first Native American Poet Laureate of the United States, Joy Harjo, in Walsh Library’s Rare Book collection.  The book is titled She Had Some Horses and the inscription reads “for Penny and Bill, in strength and in beauty.”  This refers to William Higginson and his wife, who founded From Here Press in Patterson, New Jersey.  Higginson, a specialist in haiku, donated his incredible collection of poetry books to Seton Hall in 2013.

An alto saxophonist and artist as well as poet, Harjo breaks boundaries in many aspects of her work.  Influenced by jazz and blues as well as by her Cree heritage and poetic predecessors such as Audre Lorde, Harjo’s poetry reflects on loss, survival, and the limitations of language itself.

Learn more about her work and her life.

Get to Know the Library Staff! Zachary Pelli

Zachary Pelli is the Digital Collections Infrastructure Developer for Walsh Library. He ensures all the Library’s digital projects, from interactive exhibits in Special Collections and the Gallery to remote reference appointments for the liaison librarians, operate smoothly. Additionally, he maintains open source software systems used by the library, giving Zach an opportunity to build new tools as digital library practices evolve. You may also recognize his work from the library website (https://library.shu.edu/home), which he created.

How long have you been working at the library?

Just over 5 years.

What was the last book you read that you really enjoyed?

Currently binging The Stormlight Archive series by Brandon Sanderson (currently halfway through Words of Radiance). I also listen to many podcasts.

Print book or ebook?

Audiobook or podcast. I’m a terribly slow reader.

What is the best way to rest / decompress?

Lift heavy weights or go for a run with a (non-political) podcast. I also enjoy PC gaming when I find the time.

What is something most people don’t know about you?

I am a tribal citizen of Muscogee Nation. There’s not many of us in NJ!

Are you a morning person or a night owl?

Night owl.

Researching Things: Our App-Based Library Scavenger Hunt

Did you know that all first-year students enrolled in University Life complete our app-based library scavenger hunt for course credit? See below to check out some highlights.

The app, created by members of our Library Instruction Committee (Brooke Duffy, Gerry Shea, Chelsea Barrett, Kaitlin Kehnemuyi, with consultation from Archivist Sheridan Sayles), was conceived in 2019 by Brooke Duffy, Coordinator of Instruction Librarian and Hezal Patel, Assistant Dean of the Center for Academic Success. Prior to 2019, first-year students took a librarian-led group tour of the library as part of University Life.

This self-guided, app-based scavenger hunt allows students to learn at their own pace about all of the many resources the library offers and to become comfortable in the space. Students are also asked to complete small tasks and answer questions to check their knowledge along the way. Last year we added a theme to the scavenger hunt loosely based on the Stranger Things television series on Netflix. This year we offer both an in-person version of the app and an entirely virtual version.

Here is the “trailer” for the Scavenger Hunt, introducing our team of instruction librarians!

Below are some screenshots from the scavenger hunt app, which is hosted by the ActionBound platform.

 

 

Special Collections Receives $19,872 Grant from New Jersey Historical Commission

The Monsignor William Noe Field Archives and Special Collections has received a grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission to process its collections documenting Irish immigrant history. The project, titled “Irish Immigrant Solidarity in New Jersey, 1870-Present,” will organize and preserve an enormous collection of papers donated to the archives by John Concannon, the historian of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians, as well as three smaller collections: records of the Montclair chapter of the Knights of Columbus, the papers of James McFarland which document the activities of the Trenton branch of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians, and the records of the Ancient Order of the Hibernians from Bergen County and Rahway. These records build on Seton Hall’s long history of engagement with Irish American culture to illustrate the communal bonds that supported these immigrants as they built new lives in America. Immigrant history is a particular strength of Seton Hall’s Special Collections, and this grant will assist the archives in the preservation of this history for future generations, as well as sharing it with students and faculty today.

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