New Enhancements in PolicyMap

See what’s new in PolicyMap, a GIS mapping tool, which is used at SHU in many programs such as Public Health, Political Science and Education for student assignments and useful data for grant applications.  There are fantastic new enhancements to make PolicyMap even more essential in your classroom and for your research including simplified data labels, histograms for ranges, an amazing number of boundaries and custom regions you can create, data benchmarks for context and the ability to add local data to PolicyMap that is important for your research. On  June 1,  the Libraries held a webinar that looked at new data including predominant race, mortgage denials/redlining, Social Vulnerability Index (CDC), andjh Medically Underserved Areas.  The recording of the June 1 webinar is located here.  Additional sessions will be scheduled over the summer.  Stay tuned to SHU Libraries social media.

Information about new features is listed below:

There are additional resources available with sample assignments about using PolicyMap in the classroom here:  https://policymap.helpdocs.io/academic-resources.

Please contact your liaison librarian for more information about PolicyMap.

Library Summer Hours

SHU_Libraries is as excited about this upcoming summer as you are! With all that excitement in the air, we want to remind every student, faculty, staff, and administrator:

I. Individuals who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear a mask or practice social distancing indoors on each campus and at indoor, off-campus University activities. However, they are welcome to wear a mask if they choose.

II. Individuals who are not fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask indoors on each campus and at indoor, off-campus University activities.

III. Enforcement is via the honor code. We expect everyone will be truthful in their reporting and activities.

IV. Food is not permitted in the library, but covered drinks and water bottles are allowed.

Library guests, visitors, and members of the community are allowed in-person access to the library, provided that upon entering the library:

        • they observe I – IV (above);
        • they obtain a visitor’s pass at the circulation desk (to be worn visibly at all times while in the library);
        • they sign in the Visitor’s Book;
        • they understand that there is no guest access to computers during Summer 2021.

L I B R A R Y   S U M M E R   H O U R S   2 0 2 1

Monday, May 3rd  Wednesday, May 19th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 10:30pm
                • Saturday & Sunday          8:30am – 5:30pm

Thursday, May 20th  Friday, May 28th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 6:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday         CLOSED

Memorial Day Weekend
Saturday, May 29th – Monday, May 31st CLOSED


Tuesday, June 1st  Friday, August 6th

                • Monday – Friday             7:30am – 6:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday        9:00am – 4:00pm

* Juneteenth Friday, June 18th      7:30am – 3:30pm *
* CLOSED Sunday, July 4th – Monday, July 5th *
* CLOSED Saturday, August 7th – Sunday, August 8th *


  Monday, August 9th  — Sunday, August 29th

                • Monday – Friday            8:00am – 5:00pm
                • Saturday & Sunday        CLOSED

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

          • Seton Hall University – University Libraries (Fall 2021)
          • Application Deadline: July 15, 2021
          • Fellowship Period: Fall 2021

Background

Seton Hall University Libraries support excellence in academic and individual work, enable inquiry, foster intellectual and ethical integrity and respect for diverse points of view through user-focused services and robust collections as the intellectual and cultural heart of the University.  Walsh Gallery, based in the Library, manages the University’s museum collections, and the Library’s Data Services division assists the University community in managing and presenting their data.

One of Seton Hall University’s most distinguished collections, the D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, includes coins of ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire and Byzantium as well as a small collection of related Byzantine and Etruscan artifacts: oil lamps, game pieces, weights and terra cotta figurines. Donor Ron D’Argenio became interested in ancient coins when taking courses in Greek drama and history as an undergraduate at Fordham University in the 1970’s. In 2001, he generously donated his collection to Seton Hall University in memory of his father, Rinaldo J. D’Argenio, who served in World War II and was awarded a Bronze Star for his valor. Ron D’Argenio is a practicing attorney working in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The collection is available for study and research by students and scholars.

Data Services offers consultations to SHU community members assisting them with every stage of a data project from conceptualization, to choosing tools, to data analysis, to sharing results.  Find more on the tools supported here: https://library.shu.edu/data-services.

Request for Proposals

The University Libraries seeks fellowship proposals using the Ron D’Argenio Collection as the basis for projects in the following two areas:

          • Classics, Art History or History : a scholar from one of these fields, a related field or interdisciplinary scholar who would be able to analyze the collection in its historical context and add to our knowledge of the objects.
          • Data Visualization: a specialist in data visualization, who would be able to create – in conversation with the humanities scholar (above) – an interactive visual representation of the collection that would allow users to explore the objects by interpreting and presenting the data in a number of ways (see all the coins within a certain date range, or all coins from a particular region, for example).

Specialists who have at minimum completed all coursework for the the terminal degree in their area are invited to propose research projects that fall under one or both of the above areas. Preference will go to the strongest applications that are both feasible for this collection and our technology infrastructure. All projects should incorporate the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities.  The final product for the Classics/Art History/History scholar would take the form of a short (5-7 page) written report interpreting the collection which would additionally be shared with the University community as an article or lecture.  The Data Visualization scholar would be responsible for producing a data visualization project which would be publicly presented on the University Libraries website and the process of creation described in an article or lecture.  Beyond the duration of the fellowship, the work of both fellows will inform future initiatives with the collection.

You can view a small portion of the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities on our Google Arts and Culture page or you may make a research appointment to gather additional data and/or view the collection by contacting us at walshgallery@shu.edu or 973-275-2033.

Terms/Eligibility for Fellowships

Scholars who at minimum have completed all coursework for the terminal degree in their field may apply.  Work can be performed remotely for the most part.  Access to the collections on site is conducted in a socially distanced environment compliant with all recommendations aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19.  The University Libraries will provide each fellow with access to its library databases and resources, accounts in and support for the data software available, an email address and access to Microsoft Teams software for collaboration and Sharepoint for storage space.  Fellows will be expected to give a presentation or write an article on their project to share with the University community by the fall of 2022.

Fellows will be paid a stipend of $2,500 for projects that focus on one of the two areas. Half will be paid on award, half on project completion.  Applicants may propose a project that incorporates both Classical scholarship and data visualization for a combined $5000 to be disbursed in the same way.

Procedures

Submit a single pdf including the following components as an email attachment to library@shu.edu :

          • an application cover sheet (which includes your name, project title, contact information and a short bio.
          • a two-page statement (roughly 500 words), describing your research project and its relation to the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, in which you explain how it fits into your past research (if applicable) and future plans.
          • a curriculum vitae
          • a recent example of scholarship

Notifications

Submissions must be received by July 15, 2021. Applicants will be notified by September 1, 2021. Research should take place in the fall of 2021, and the project results (written work or data visualization) completed by May 31, 2022. The lecture or article on the project should take place in the spring or fall of 2022. Please contact Sarah Ponichtera, Assistant Dean of Special Collections and the Gallery at sarah.ponichtera@shu .edu with any questions.

Come Celebrate Shakespeare at the University Libraries

To mark the 457th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, University Libraries highlights resources focused on one of the world’s greatest playwrights.

If you would like to watch productions of Shakespeare’s most famous plays, please check out the BBC Shakespeare Plays. This collection features 37 plays produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

The New Oxford Shakespeare presents an entirely new consideration of all of Shakespeare’s works, edited from first principles from the original texts themselves, and drawing on the latest textual and theatrical scholarship. The Oxford Scholarly Editions Online brings the content of all three print volumes together as one powerful resource.

Additionally, University Libraries subscribes to some of the top Shakespeare studies journals including: Shakespeare, Shakespeare Quarterly and Shakespeare Studies. Shakespeare is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of Shakespeare. It publishes articles on criticism, performance, and the history of Shakespeare and his works. Shakespeare Quarterly is peer-reviewed journal published for the Folger Shakespeare Library by the Oxford University Press. The journal publishes original works related to all aspects of Shakespeare studies. Shakespeare Studies is a peer-reviewed volume published annually with a focus on Shakespeare studies and theatre. The journal features the work of performance scholars, literary critics, and cultural historians.

Lastly, the Library provides access to subscription-based or open-access scholarly resources such as Folgerpedia, Open-Source Shakespeare, JSTOR Understanding Shakespeare, and Shakespeare in the Digital Age from the University of Notre Dame.

Ophelia Master’s Thesis Gets 2000 Hits: Mystery Solved?

The master’s thesis: Ophelia’s Mistreatment and Ignored Monastic Opportunities by Seton Hall graduate Danielle Tovsen has been downloaded nearly 2000 times since the end of 2017. Tovsen graduated from Seton Hall in 2010 with an MA in English. She argues in her thesis “that Ophelia could have saved her own life if she had left home and fled to a nunnery; the treatment she received from Laertes and Polonius was worse than Hamlet’s treatment of her throughout the play.”

Dr. Marta Deyrup, Outreach and Humanities Librarian at University Libraries, discovered the thesis while doing research on Shakespeare in the Seton Hall eRepository. The high number of downloads impressed Dr. Deyrup, which led her to contact Dr. Chrysanthy Grieco, the advisor on the thesis and both a former dean of University Libraries and chair of the English Department. Dr. Grieco could not answer why it has had close to 2000 hits, but she did say “that’s an astounding number for an MA paper.” She also guessed “that those interested in feminist texts—though I doubt this is one—found some yeast for their bread” in Tovsen’s work.

Another interesting aspect of the mystery is the location of the downloads. A good number of the downloads were from educational institutions such as the Michigan Statewide Educational Network and Orange County Department of Education. Dr. Deyrup thinks this might indicate the thesis is being used to support the research of middle and high school students.

American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

by Chelsea BarrettChelsea Barrett

The 2021 ALA Midwinter Conference which took place virtually January 22-26 was full of amazing presentations and presenters! There were engaging talks, revelations and roundtables focusing on various areas of librarianship, on topics ranging from antiracism and women’s suffrage to algorithmic bias and gaming. Some of the talks included high-profile names such as Ziggy Marley, Ruby Bridges, Dr. Jill Biden, Ibrahm X. Kendi, and the late, great Cicely Tyson. Here are a few highlights from conference: 

Friday, January 22 

Natalie Baszile 

Bazile, the author of the book “Queen Sugar” which has since been made into a television series, spoke on the desire to shift the narrative on agriculture, farming, and labor. In her new book “We are Each Other’s Harvest”, Bazile discusses land ownership and land stewardship from a nonfiction lens, seeking to include the complicated history of black farmers and agriculture into the perception of farming and land. This was an engaging talk steeped in history and cultural context which makes her new book must-read. 

Recommended Read: We Are Each Other’s Harvest: Celebrating African American Farmers, Land, and Legacy 


Ruby Bridges 

Civil rights activist Ruby Bridges, spoke of her new book “This is Your Time” which speaks on her experience as the first black student in a desegregated elementary school, all at the age of 6 years old. In the telling of her story, Bridges speaks on how her recently passed mother gave her the determination, inspiration, and strength to get through the hateful and impassioned situation she was placed. Some of the pertinent themes were the protection of Bridges innocence by her parents as well as the protection and support given to Bridges by one of her white, female teachers. This was a very inspired talk and alludes to the deep messages embedded in this work. 

Recommended Read: “This is Your Time” 


Saturday, January 23 

Ibrahm X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain 

#1 New York Times bestselling author Ibrahm X. Kendi and award-winning historian, professor and writer Keisha N. Blain discussed a new book they both co-edited titled “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”. This work involved the bringing together of 80 black writers to write about the history of community, regardless of gender, immigration, and other factors. Of the 80 different writers, who wrote 5 years of African American history (400 years), there are10 poets who wrote poems as interludes In the process of writing this book, the writers not only reflected history but also made history in the process.  

Recommended Read: “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”


Ziggy Marley 

Eight-time Grammy Award winner, author, philanthropist, and reggae icon Ziggy Marley spoke at the ALA Conference and shared two up and coming books— “My Dog Romeo” and “Music is in Everything”. He explained that many of the ideas for these books came from encounters with nature and his children, showing the organic nature of his thought process. If that was not enough of a treat, Ziggy Marley then proceeded to grace us with a musical performance of Music is in Everything! These children’s books are ones to place on your shelves! 

Recommended Reads:  “My Dog Romeo”       

  “Music is in Everything” 


Sunday, January 24 

Cicely Tyson 

It was an honor to hear the legendary Cicely Tyson speak at the ALA Midwinter Conference, 4 days before her passing. Throughout her illustrious career she has taken on roles which served a purpose to her personal philosophy on advocating for Black women and promoting positivity in the midst of a tortured history. During her talk, Mrs. Tyson spoke on the release of her autobiography “Just As I Am: A Memoir”, a timely release for such a sensational woman. She spoke on her experience as an actress, highlighting issues for Black women actresses, economic issues that impacted the industry and offered inspirational and enlightening advice to the audience. She spoke with an earnest tone, wanting to uplift those who read her memoir to not be swayed by her experiences but rather motivated to combat these challenges and rise above any obstacle life may bring. Again, it was an honor to hear Mrs. Tyson speak and it is a privilege that her legacy lives on in her wonderful memoir. 

Recommended Read: “Just As I Am: A Memoir 


Ian Kitajima

Ian Kitajima, the Oceanit Director of Corporate Development, “Corporate Intrapreneur of the Year” (2017) and “Social Impact Enterprise of the Year(2018) spoke on Artificial Intelligence as it currently exists and the implications of AI going forward. One of the highlights of this talk was the presentation of a video which showed a Google Assistant making an actual haircut appointment for the user in real-time! It was using Google Duplex which is something that may be worth exploring. There was also talk of the changing landscape where data can be a superpower skill for students and the overall community. Other examples shown were how Artificial Intelligence can be used to measure social distancing by honing into how far apart people are from one another and a video game where the person is the controller. Clearly, the world of AI is continuing to grow and as Mr. Kitajima pointed out, we must evolve with it! 

Recommended Viewing: SHU Libraries Data Ethics and Literacy Guide 


Monday, January 25 

Dr. Jill Biden 

The closing speaker for the conference was First Lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, a lifelong educator, community college professor, author, and advocate for the rights and welfare of women, girls, and people with disabilities. During her talk she focused on the importance of reading and learning, specifically homing in on her love of reading and the joy and beauty found in books. Dr. Biden stated that loving to read means loving to learn and through that learning process comes connection, understanding, compassion and wisdom from those who came before us. Through learning, who we are and who we can become are revealed and what a better place to discover yourself than within a library! Libraries fulfil a purpose as a place of information for all, a place for community and a place where expertise and education are offered. Utilize this space for exploration and develop critical information skills and you will be on your way! 

Recommended Reads:  

Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself 

JOEY: The Story of Joe Biden

For more information on up-and-coming events, please continue to visit this blog and follow @SHU_Libraries on Instagram and Twitter  

 

 

 

Women’s History Month – The Period Movement @ SHU

This Women’s History Month, Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to work with The Period Movement @ SHU to highlight items in our collection that intersect with their mission to end period poverty and stigmas around menstruation.

Their collection can be found at https://library.shu.edu/2021dislays/whm

Interested in reading these items? The items in this book display are mostly eBooks which can be read anywhere, the physical items can be placed on hold.

Want to learn more about this group or join them?

The Period Movement @ SHU fights to end period poverty and stigmas through service, education, and advocacy. We aim to serve menstruators in the populated communities around us, especially those who are not fortunate enough to have access to sanitary products. We recognize that menstruation is a burden to many, causing financial strains as well as reproductive health problems that are not widely taught in school. Along with these burdens, there are many cultural and societal stigmas that are not widely acknowledged and instead kept behind closed doors. Every menstruator should feel encouraged to discuss their personal experiences with the world, slowly changing the taboo mentality that society today holds towards reproductive health. In order to normalize open conversation about menstruation, we aim to use our chapter to encourage discussion in our own community, starting right here on campus. Our club is about serving the communities around us, including women and students in cities such as South Orange, Newark, and even New York City.

In order to get involved, please contact Period Movement:

Seton Hall University Libraries Joins HathiTrust

Seton Hall University Libraries has become the newest member of HathiTrust (www.hathitrust.org), a global collaborative of research and academic libraries working towards its mission to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future.

Today, HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.

HathiTrust members steward this collection under the aims of scholarly, not corporate, interests. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community. This offers an unprecedented opportunity to steward the cultural record through increasingly interdependent work that develops capacity and sparks innovation.

Authorized Seton Hall University constituents can access Hathi Trust with their PirateNet credentials here.

For more information, see 2021 HathiTrust At-a-Glance [pdf]

February Speaker’s Series Event

#SHU_Libraries is pleased to announce the next event in our Speaker’s Series: Critical Issues in Information and Education—

“Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools.” 

***View a recording of the event here***

When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 (4:00-5:15pm)

About Our Speakers: 

Image of Elaina Norlin

Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). In her role, Ms. Norlin develops and expands ASERL’s Professional Development programming, including the development of new activities to advance ASERL’s goals for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). “As the ASERL Professional Development/DEI Coordinator, I’m passionate about transforming workplace organizations from dysfunctional to a place everyone feels valued, respected and honored for their unique and special contributions to the organization.”

For ten years, Ms. Norlin served as Executive Director of the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, overseeing significant programmatic growth and community outreach activities. She previously worked for OCLC, the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the University of Arizona.

In addition, Ms. Norlin works closely with leaders and educators to develop, implement, and assess programs that support diversity, equity, and inclusion, employee engagement, institutional growth, and workplace culture.

Ms. Norlin earned her Bachelor of Arts in Communications (Advertising) from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, her Master of Library and Information Science is also from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  

Image of John Kummings

J. Kenyon Kummings is the Superintendent for Wildwood Public Schools (WPS). Mr. Kummings has served as the Superintendent for WPS since 2014. Prior to assuming that role he was the elementary school principal for seven years. WPS has a high percentage of economically disadvantaged students and is racially and ethnically diverse. The district is unique in that it continuously has one of the highest percentages of students living in poverty in the state of New Jersey (50%). WPS is the only P-12 Urban district in Cape May County and has been fine tuned to meet the needs of its students given that its demographic consists of large populations of special education students (24%), and English Language Learners (35% Pre-K to 8thGrade).

Mr. Kummings has testified several times before the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and most recently before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools regarding the recruitment of minority education candidates.  His testimony from that day along with the expert testimony of representatives of Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s) identified that there are systemic barriers to entering EPP’s, many of which are attributed to standardized assessments that are leading to inequitable outcomes.  

Mr. Kummings earned his Bachelor of Arts from Rutgers University, his Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey, and is currently working on a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Rowan University.

Library Launches New Qualitative Data Analysis Software for University Community

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to announce the purchase of a limited number of qualitative data analysis software Atlas.ti (desktop, version 9), and ATLAS.ti Cloud licenses. Atlas.ti (desktop) software supports coding textual, graphical, audio, or video data; managing and annotating a literature review; and creating data visualizations or network diagrams. Atlas.ti cloud is used primarily for text documents and supports collaborative access to shared projects.

Lynn CarrSociology Professor C. Lynn Carr notes: “I love Atlas.ti! I don’t know how I’d do qualitative research with large amounts of data without data management software. Atlas.ti is easy to use for coding data and organizing it. It’s largely intuitive. I find it indispensable for data analysis, assisting me in envisioning relationships among categories as they emerge from the data. In the writing stage, it allows me to easily find the quotes I need.”

Seton Hall University Libraries wishes to acknowledge that this purchase would not have been possible without funding support via special faculty development grants and wishes to extend a thank you to the Office of the Provost. Additionally, SHU’s Department of Information Technology assisted in facilitating the licensing of this software.

How to request and install Atlas.ti?

To request a copy of Atlas.ti use the Atlas.ti request form from SHU Libraries Data Services.

For help with Atlas.ti please contact SHU Libraries Data Services:
https://library.shu.edu/data-services | data.services@shu.edu