American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

American Library Association Midwinter Conference Recap 

by Chelsea BarrettChelsea Barrett

The 2021 ALA Midwinter Conference which took place virtually January 22-26 was full of amazing presentations and presenters! There were engaging talks, revelations and roundtables focusing on various areas of librarianship, on topics ranging from antiracism and women’s suffrage to algorithmic bias and gaming. Some of the talks included high-profile names such as Ziggy Marley, Ruby Bridges, Dr. Jill Biden, Ibrahm X. Kendi, and the late, great Cicely Tyson. Here are a few highlights from conference: 

Friday, January 22 

Natalie Baszile 

Bazile, the author of the book “Queen Sugar” which has since been made into a television series, spoke on the desire to shift the narrative on agriculture, farming, and labor. In her new book “We are Each Other’s Harvest”, Bazile discusses land ownership and land stewardship from a nonfiction lens, seeking to include the complicated history of black farmers and agriculture into the perception of farming and land. This was an engaging talk steeped in history and cultural context which makes her new book must-read. 

Recommended Read: We Are Each Other’s Harvest: Celebrating African American Farmers, Land, and Legacy 


Ruby Bridges 

Civil rights activist Ruby Bridges, spoke of her new book “This is Your Time” which speaks on her experience as the first black student in a desegregated elementary school, all at the age of 6 years old. In the telling of her story, Bridges speaks on how her recently passed mother gave her the determination, inspiration, and strength to get through the hateful and impassioned situation she was placed. Some of the pertinent themes were the protection of Bridges innocence by her parents as well as the protection and support given to Bridges by one of her white, female teachers. This was a very inspired talk and alludes to the deep messages embedded in this work. 

Recommended Read: “This is Your Time” 


Saturday, January 23 

Ibrahm X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain 

#1 New York Times bestselling author Ibrahm X. Kendi and award-winning historian, professor and writer Keisha N. Blain discussed a new book they both co-edited titled “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”. This work involved the bringing together of 80 black writers to write about the history of community, regardless of gender, immigration, and other factors. Of the 80 different writers, who wrote 5 years of African American history (400 years), there are10 poets who wrote poems as interludes In the process of writing this book, the writers not only reflected history but also made history in the process.  

Recommended Read: “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019”


Ziggy Marley 

Eight-time Grammy Award winner, author, philanthropist, and reggae icon Ziggy Marley spoke at the ALA Conference and shared two up and coming books— “My Dog Romeo” and “Music is in Everything”. He explained that many of the ideas for these books came from encounters with nature and his children, showing the organic nature of his thought process. If that was not enough of a treat, Ziggy Marley then proceeded to grace us with a musical performance of Music is in Everything! These children’s books are ones to place on your shelves! 

Recommended Reads:  “My Dog Romeo”       

  “Music is in Everything” 


Sunday, January 24 

Cicely Tyson 

It was an honor to hear the legendary Cicely Tyson speak at the ALA Midwinter Conference, 4 days before her passing. Throughout her illustrious career she has taken on roles which served a purpose to her personal philosophy on advocating for Black women and promoting positivity in the midst of a tortured history. During her talk, Mrs. Tyson spoke on the release of her autobiography “Just As I Am: A Memoir”, a timely release for such a sensational woman. She spoke on her experience as an actress, highlighting issues for Black women actresses, economic issues that impacted the industry and offered inspirational and enlightening advice to the audience. She spoke with an earnest tone, wanting to uplift those who read her memoir to not be swayed by her experiences but rather motivated to combat these challenges and rise above any obstacle life may bring. Again, it was an honor to hear Mrs. Tyson speak and it is a privilege that her legacy lives on in her wonderful memoir. 

Recommended Read: “Just As I Am: A Memoir 


Ian Kitajima

Ian Kitajima, the Oceanit Director of Corporate Development, “Corporate Intrapreneur of the Year” (2017) and “Social Impact Enterprise of the Year(2018) spoke on Artificial Intelligence as it currently exists and the implications of AI going forward. One of the highlights of this talk was the presentation of a video which showed a Google Assistant making an actual haircut appointment for the user in real-time! It was using Google Duplex which is something that may be worth exploring. There was also talk of the changing landscape where data can be a superpower skill for students and the overall community. Other examples shown were how Artificial Intelligence can be used to measure social distancing by honing into how far apart people are from one another and a video game where the person is the controller. Clearly, the world of AI is continuing to grow and as Mr. Kitajima pointed out, we must evolve with it! 

Recommended Viewing: SHU Libraries Data Ethics and Literacy Guide 


Monday, January 25 

Dr. Jill Biden 

The closing speaker for the conference was First Lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, a lifelong educator, community college professor, author, and advocate for the rights and welfare of women, girls, and people with disabilities. During her talk she focused on the importance of reading and learning, specifically homing in on her love of reading and the joy and beauty found in books. Dr. Biden stated that loving to read means loving to learn and through that learning process comes connection, understanding, compassion and wisdom from those who came before us. Through learning, who we are and who we can become are revealed and what a better place to discover yourself than within a library! Libraries fulfil a purpose as a place of information for all, a place for community and a place where expertise and education are offered. Utilize this space for exploration and develop critical information skills and you will be on your way! 

Recommended Reads:  

Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself 

JOEY: The Story of Joe Biden

For more information on up-and-coming events, please continue to visit this blog and follow @SHU_Libraries on Instagram and Twitter  

 

 

 

Women’s History Month – The Period Movement @ SHU

This Women’s History Month, Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to work with The Period Movement @ SHU to highlight items in our collection that intersect with their mission to end period poverty and stigmas around menstruation.

Their collection can be found at https://library.shu.edu/2021dislays/whm

Interested in reading these items? The items in this book display are mostly eBooks which can be read anywhere, the physical items can be placed on hold.

Want to learn more about this group or join them?

The Period Movement @ SHU fights to end period poverty and stigmas through service, education, and advocacy. We aim to serve menstruators in the populated communities around us, especially those who are not fortunate enough to have access to sanitary products. We recognize that menstruation is a burden to many, causing financial strains as well as reproductive health problems that are not widely taught in school. Along with these burdens, there are many cultural and societal stigmas that are not widely acknowledged and instead kept behind closed doors. Every menstruator should feel encouraged to discuss their personal experiences with the world, slowly changing the taboo mentality that society today holds towards reproductive health. In order to normalize open conversation about menstruation, we aim to use our chapter to encourage discussion in our own community, starting right here on campus. Our club is about serving the communities around us, including women and students in cities such as South Orange, Newark, and even New York City.

In order to get involved, please contact Period Movement:

Seton Hall University Libraries Joins HathiTrust

Seton Hall University Libraries has become the newest member of HathiTrust (www.hathitrust.org), a global collaborative of research and academic libraries working towards its mission to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future.

Today, HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.

HathiTrust members steward this collection under the aims of scholarly, not corporate, interests. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community. This offers an unprecedented opportunity to steward the cultural record through increasingly interdependent work that develops capacity and sparks innovation.

Authorized Seton Hall University constituents can access Hathi Trust with their PirateNet credentials here.

For more information, see 2021 HathiTrust At-a-Glance [pdf]

February Speaker’s Series Event

#SHU_Libraries is pleased to announce the next event in our Speaker’s Series: Critical Issues in Information and Education—

“Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools.” 

***View a recording of the event here***

When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 (4:00-5:15pm)

About Our Speakers: 

Image of Elaina Norlin

Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). In her role, Ms. Norlin develops and expands ASERL’s Professional Development programming, including the development of new activities to advance ASERL’s goals for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). “As the ASERL Professional Development/DEI Coordinator, I’m passionate about transforming workplace organizations from dysfunctional to a place everyone feels valued, respected and honored for their unique and special contributions to the organization.”

For ten years, Ms. Norlin served as Executive Director of the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, overseeing significant programmatic growth and community outreach activities. She previously worked for OCLC, the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the University of Arizona.

In addition, Ms. Norlin works closely with leaders and educators to develop, implement, and assess programs that support diversity, equity, and inclusion, employee engagement, institutional growth, and workplace culture.

Ms. Norlin earned her Bachelor of Arts in Communications (Advertising) from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, her Master of Library and Information Science is also from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  

Image of John Kummings

J. Kenyon Kummings is the Superintendent for Wildwood Public Schools (WPS). Mr. Kummings has served as the Superintendent for WPS since 2014. Prior to assuming that role he was the elementary school principal for seven years. WPS has a high percentage of economically disadvantaged students and is racially and ethnically diverse. The district is unique in that it continuously has one of the highest percentages of students living in poverty in the state of New Jersey (50%). WPS is the only P-12 Urban district in Cape May County and has been fine tuned to meet the needs of its students given that its demographic consists of large populations of special education students (24%), and English Language Learners (35% Pre-K to 8thGrade).

Mr. Kummings has testified several times before the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and most recently before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools regarding the recruitment of minority education candidates.  His testimony from that day along with the expert testimony of representatives of Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s) identified that there are systemic barriers to entering EPP’s, many of which are attributed to standardized assessments that are leading to inequitable outcomes.  

Mr. Kummings earned his Bachelor of Arts from Rutgers University, his Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey, and is currently working on a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Rowan University.

Library Launches New Qualitative Data Analysis Software for University Community

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Seton Hall University Libraries is excited to announce the purchase of a limited number of qualitative data analysis software Atlas.ti (desktop, version 9), and ATLAS.ti Cloud licenses. Atlas.ti (desktop) software supports coding textual, graphical, audio, or video data; managing and annotating a literature review; and creating data visualizations or network diagrams. Atlas.ti cloud is used primarily for text documents and supports collaborative access to shared projects.

Lynn CarrSociology Professor C. Lynn Carr notes: “I love Atlas.ti! I don’t know how I’d do qualitative research with large amounts of data without data management software. Atlas.ti is easy to use for coding data and organizing it. It’s largely intuitive. I find it indispensable for data analysis, assisting me in envisioning relationships among categories as they emerge from the data. In the writing stage, it allows me to easily find the quotes I need.”

Seton Hall University Libraries wishes to acknowledge that this purchase would not have been possible without funding support via special faculty development grants and wishes to extend a thank you to the Office of the Provost. Additionally, SHU’s Department of Information Technology assisted in facilitating the licensing of this software.

How to request and install Atlas.ti?

To request a copy of Atlas.ti use the Atlas.ti request form from SHU Libraries Data Services.

For help with Atlas.ti please contact SHU Libraries Data Services:
https://library.shu.edu/data-services | data.services@shu.edu

Black History Month at the Libraries and Beyond

There are so many ways to get involved and educate yourself for Black History Month (BHM) this February, and beyond. Walsh Library is pleased to partner with and promote events for BHM with various departments and committees across campus, including: Africana Studies and History departments, several Black Student Organizations, and committees.

See a list of BHM events university-wide.

Attend a Library BHM Event

Algorithmic Bias and Data Ethics (Wednesday, February 10, 2021 | 2:00pm-3:00pm) Register 

Massive amounts of data, often personal data, are used and gathered in more and more technologies. With that comes the need for data ethics to become better established and understood. Data can be used in helpful and innovative ways, but it can also be used against people and communities, particularly communities of color. Come join us in an introductory discussion of this topic.

Douglass Day Conversation (Friday, February 12, 2021 | 5:30pm-6:30pm) Register 

Celebrate the legacy of Frederick Douglass with mini-lectures by Africana Studies and History faculty about Douglass, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells, and more. Members of SHU Black Student Organizations will help facilitate discussions. We will end with information about how you can contribute to Black feminist scholarship by transcribing the papers of Mary Church Terrell.

Seton Hall University Libraries Speaker’s Series (Wednesday, February 24, 2021 | 4:00pm-5:15pm) Register

      • “Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools”
      • Join guest speakers Elaine Norlin (Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries) and  J. Kenyon Kummings (the Superintendent for New Jersey’s Wildwood Public Schools)  for an engaging discussion on diversity.

#BHM365

Learning about Black history shouldn’t end when February is over. Keep Black History Month going year-round by continuing to educate yourself. Here are some sources to help you:

Art & Visual Culture
The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall has a long history of hosting exhibitions on Black culture. Take a glance through some of these materials pulled together by Gallery Director Jeanne Brasile.

Follow Seton Hall University Libraries on social media for BHM updates and much more!

Instagram · Twitter · Facebook

Welcome Students!

A big Pirate “Welcome” to new students and “Welcome Back” to returning students!

For Spring Semester 2021, the Library is open 7 days a week (see our hours), starting Wednesday, January 27th.

In accordance with SHU Policy and the SHU Pledge, while you are in the library please remember that in light of the continuing health threat posed by the COVID19 pandemic:

      • masks must be worn at all times.
      • social distancing must be observed (keep a distance of 6 feet between you and others).  Please do not move chairs/desks/furniture to sit closer to someone else. The furniture has been laid out to provide a safe space between others.
      • there is no food allowed (you may not eat in the building).
      • drinks are allowed in covered containers only.
      • group study rooms remain closed and unavailable.
      • library space is available only to SHU ID cardholders at this time. Members of the public, recent graduates, community borrowers, Seton Hall University alumni, retired/emeriti faculty, and visiting scholars are not permitted in the building, with the exception of those who have made prior arrangements with the Archives to consult Special Collections materials.

2021 Spring Semester Hours

2021 Spring Semester Hours

Intersession: Monday, January 4th — Tuesday, January 26th   

        • Monday – Friday              8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday          CLOSED

CLOSED for Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Monday, January 18th


Wednesday, January 27th — Wednesday, March 31st    

        • Monday – Friday                7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday            8:30am – 5:30pm

CLOSED for Easter: Thursday, April 1st – Sunday,  April 4th


Monday, April 5th — Tuesday, May 19th     

        • Monday – Friday               7:30am – 10:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday           8:30am – 5:30pm

Wednesday, May 20th — Friday, May 28th     

        • Monday – Friday             8:00am – 7:30pm
        • Saturday & Sunday         CLOSED

CLOSED Memorial Day Weekend: Saturday,  May 29th – Monday, May 31st

Online Forum: Traditional Media, Social Media, and the Polarization of the Electorate

Online Forum: Traditional Media, Social Media, and the Polarization of the Electorate

When: Monday November 30th @ 7pm on Zoom (click here to join the meeting)

This forum will address:

      • How has the shift from traditional to social media contributed to the polarization of the electorate?
      • How do social media “bubbles” contribute to this phenomenon?
      • Are there ways to counteract these trends?
      • How is belief information affected by social media?

Panelists:

      • Vin Gopal (New Jersey Senator 11th District)
      • Alex Torpey (former South Orange Village President)
      • Robert Pallitto (Professor of Political Science and Public Administration)

Moderator: Steven Schnall (South Orange Village Trustee)

All are welcome to attend.

The event will be recorded & posted here and here.

View the Online Forum Poster.

Co-sponsored by: Seton Hall University College of Arts & Sciences, Seton Hall University Libraries, The East Orange Public Library, The Maplewood Public Library, The Orange Public Library, and The South Orange Public Library.


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