Creating an Open Access Journal with the University Libraries

by Maria A. Barca

Are you interested in publishing in or creating an Open Access journal? If your answer is “yes!”, but you don’t know where to start, then keep reading. In this blog post, we’ll look at how Seton Hall University Libraries can help you create or publish in an Open Access journal.

Open Access scholarship—including journals—are high-quality, peer-reviewed works that are freely available for people to access. There are no financial, legal, or technical barriers to accessing Open Access content. See this link for more information.

So where would you go to publish or create an Open Access journal? To our repository, of course!

Seton Hall University has an institutional repository: eRepository @ Seton Hall. Through the eRepository, Seton Hall students, faculty, researchers, and other community members can upload their Open Access scholarly research, data and datasets, podcasts, infographics, presentations, etc., for the world to access. You can immediately see the reach that our eRepository has with the interactive map found on the front page of the site.

If the prospect of posting in our eRepository excites you: good! Your librarians are here to help you upload your scholarly works to the repository; and if you have even bigger goals, we can also help you create academic, peer-reviewed Open Access journals to showcase the works of scholars and students on a particular topic or area of expertise. One of our eRepository journals, Locus: The Seton Hall Journal of Undergraduate Research, has been particularly successful.

If you are interested in publishing in the eRepository, creating an Open Access journal, or just have more questions about how we can help you expand your research output, please contact the Research Information Management Librarian, Maria A. Barca (maria.barca@shu.edu) or reach out to the eRepository email (eRepository@shu.edu).

Celebrate the Year of the Rabbit at New Walsh Gallery Exhibit

image of incense Aagainst a mountain backdrop
Lauren Schiller
Meditation: Pilgrimage
oil on panel
10″ x 8″
2019

Walsh Gallery welcomes the community to its Spring exhibit: Matter+Spirit, a collaboration between Chinese and American artists in which participants respond to the roles materiality and spirituality play in their societies.

The opening, on Wednesday January 25 from 4-7pm, coincides with the Lunar New Year, which celebrated the new Year of the Rabbit this past Sunday. Lunar New Year is celebrated in many Asian societies, including China, Korea, Vietnam, and more.

At 3pm, Professor Lauren Schiller, who was one of the artists who participated in the seminar and created one of the paintings in the exhibit, will speak about her experience in China and her piece. Join her talk on Teams.

At 4pm, the Gallery will open and the following speakers will briefly address attendees:

Welcome: John Buschman and Joseph Martinelli

Core Connections: Nancy Enright

Exhibit Overview: Jeanne Brasile

Artist Introduction: Lauren Schiller

Musical Performance: Students in the Chinese Language program, led by Dong Dong Chen.

5-7pm: explore the exhibit and enjoy refreshments outside

We hope you can join us!

First Native American Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

Image of inscribed book by Joy Harjo
Inscribed copy of She Had Some Horses by Joy Harjo in Walsh Library

Did you know that Seton Hall’s rare book collection contains poetry by Native American authors?  There is an inscribed copy of one of the early books of the first Native American Poet Laureate of the United States, Joy Harjo, in Walsh Library’s Rare Book collection.  The book is titled She Had Some Horses and the inscription reads “for Penny and Bill, in strength and in beauty.”  This refers to William Higginson and his wife, who founded From Here Press in Patterson, New Jersey.  Higginson, a specialist in haiku, donated his incredible collection of poetry books to Seton Hall in 2013.

An alto saxophonist and artist as well as poet, Harjo breaks boundaries in many aspects of her work.  Influenced by jazz and blues as well as by her Cree heritage and poetic predecessors such as Audre Lorde, Harjo’s poetry reflects on loss, survival, and the limitations of language itself.

Learn more about her work and her life.