Bigger and Better for 2020!

#SHU_Libraries Bigger and Better for 2020!

Welcome back! There are many changes for Walsh Library patrons to improve your experience.

New Furniture in the Information Commons (IC) and Silent Study Room

Over the break we rearranged and added new furniture to the IC and Silent Study room. There are smaller whiteboard tables for group work in the IC and smaller groupings of soft seating. We also created reading and group areas between the reference and curriculum collection. We added more tables to the Silent Study, large and small, in case you like to spread out and silently study! Take a look:

Information Commons

Student Selections

We added a new display area for student selections, between the reference and curriculum collection. It currently features poetry highlights from our collection. These selections are based on a theme and will change monthly, so keep checking back. Patrons are able to check out books that are on display. Take a look:

Student Selections

Loan Periods

Not as visible but with a big impact are the changes to Loan Periods we implemented over winter break. Below are some of the big changes.

      • EZBorrow books are now available for checkout for 112 days (16 weeks!) no renewal
      • Undergraduates can check out SHU material for 112 days, no renewal
      • Graduate Students and Employees get material for 365 days, no renewal
      • Faculty are 365 days (same loan period), 2 renewals

We wanted to make sure that all patrons were able to take full advantage of resources they need to succeed at Seton Hall.

Our full circulation policy has been updated online as well.


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Solo Exhibition in Walsh Gallery

GREGORY COATES: SHEER AUDACITY
January 13 – March 6, 2020
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 30th (5pm to 8pm)

#WalshGallery is please to present Gregory Coates: Sheer Audacity, a solo exhibition of recent work by the internationally renowned artist.

A social abstractionist, Coates uses ordinary objects such as feathers, handbags, curtains and shipping pallets to weave stories about his experiences while simultaneously rousing personal associations for viewers with his chosen subjects and materials.  Using art as a catalyst, Coates lures audiences into open-ended conversations to address varying societal concerns.  Audiences are disarmed by Coates’ use of textures, saturated colors and familiar objects that enables them to participate in a politically conscious dialogue that prioritizes their point of view.  Gregory Coates created new work for this exhibition in an homage to the women in his life, and the strength they embody.

The exhibition is curated by Gallery Director, Jeanne Brasile who notes “Coates’ objects are imbued with history, relevance, memory and identity – giving footing for visitors to voice their position on the subjects the artist addresses through his art.”

Programs associated with the exhibition include a Wikithon co-sponsored by the Seton Hall University Libraries, Art+Feminism and the Feminist Art Project at Rutgers University.  Brooke Duffy, Coordinator of Instruction Librarian, organized the event at which attendees will be instructed how to edit or create Wikipedia pages, using the Miriam Shapiro Archive on Women Artists as reference.  The event will take place on Wednesday, February 26th from 11am to 3pm in the Beck Rooms across from the Walsh Gallery.  No advance registration is needed, attendees may come and go during the event at which all are welcome.

The exhibition is supported in part, by a regrant from the New Jersey Council on the Arts/the Essex County Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs.

The Walsh Gallery is open 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday—Friday.

Gregory Coates "My Feminine Side" (detail)

Archives of Sexuality & Gender Now Available

#SHU_Libraries are pleased to announce access to an important new electronic resource– Archives of Sexuality & Gender available at https://library.shu.edu/sexualitygender.

Archives of Sexuality & Gender screenshot

Archives of Sexuality & Gender spans the sixteenth to twentieth centuries and is the largest digital collection of historical primary source publications relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality, and gender research and gender studies research. Documentation covering disciplines such as social, political, health, and legal issues impacting LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) communities around the world are included, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities to support research and education.  The selection of materials for this milestone digital program is guided by an advisory board consisting of leading scholars and librarians in sexuality and gender studies.

For related resources, please visit our LGBTQ+ Resources Guide [link].


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After Hours Study Space Schedule

Swipe card access to the After Hours Study Space (AHSS)  will change over Thanksgiving and the 24/7 period:

      • No swipe access  from 11pm on Tuesday, November 26 — Sunday, December 1.
      • Swipe access from 2a-7a on Monday, December 2.
      • No swipe access during 24/7 hours, from Monday December 2 — Tuesday, December 17.
      • No swipe access from Tuesday, December 17— Monday, January 13 2020.

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TLTR Copyright Committee presents “Why Worry About Copyright?” with guest Kevin Smith

Why Worry About Copyright?  
By Lysa Martinelli

Kevin Smith The Teaching, Learning and Technology Roundtable will host the presentation: “Why Worry About Copyright? A Systematic Approach to Thinking About Any Copyright Issue”. Guest speaker Kevin Smith will discuss Fair Use and the grey areas as well as providing guidance to students and the faculty that advise them on the use of published materials in dissertations and theses.
When:  Friday, September 27, 2019 from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. (lunch will be prior to the presentation at 12:00 p.m.)
Where: Walsh Library – Ground floor, Beck Rooms.
Registration Required (free): https://is.gd/p61YzaThis free event is sponsored by the Teaching, Learning & Technology Roundtable (TLTR) Copyright Committee. The TLTR is a consortium of faculty, administration and students that meets in action teams to discuss institutional issues related to teaching, learning, and technology.

Guest speaker Kevin Smith became the Dean of Libraries and Courtesy Professor of Law at the University of Kansas in May 2016, after 10 years as Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communications at the Duke University Libraries. As both a librarian and a lawyer specializing in intellectual property issues, Smith’s role at Duke was to advise faculty, staff, and students about the impact of copyright, licensing, and the changing nature of scholarly publishing in higher education. Prior to that, Smith was director of the Pilgrim Library at Defiance College in Ohio, where he also taught constitutional law. His teaching experience is various, having taught courses in theology, law, and library science; he currently teaches Copyright Law in a Digital Age for the University of Kansas Law School.

Smith is the author of numerous articles on the impact of copyright law and the internet on scholarly research as well as libraries’ role in the academy. He has been a highly regarded blogger on these issues for many years, and in 2013 published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers with the Association of College and Research Libraries. His book on Coaching Copyright, with Erin Ellis, was released by the American Library Association in the spring of 2019. Smith holds a BA from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., an MA from Yale Divinity School, an MLS from Kent State University, and a JD from Capital University. He did doctoral work in theology and literature at the University of Chicago. Smith has been admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina.

Follow Kevin Smith on Twitter https://twitter.com/kulibdean


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Faculty Resources For Streaming Media

#SHU_Libraries offer several ways to stream film and video. The Seton Hall community can steam video using Academic Video Online. Academic Video Online provides a comprehensive video collection, delivering more than 66,000 titles spanning the widest range of subject areas including anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more.

The Library offers access to over 25,000 commercial films in digital format through Digital Campus. These films may be viewed in the classroom and must be ordered by a faculty member.

Faculty members can also request films for the SHU community through Kanopy. Kanopy streams more than 26,000 films from the Criterion Collection, Great Courses, PBS, and hundreds of other producers. The films range from documentaries, indie and foreign films to classics and blockbuster movies. To start exploring our film and video collections please visit Accessing Films at SHU https://library.shu.edu/films/home.

Streaming Platforms

Please Contact Prof. Gerry Shea for further information.


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Italian Studies Institute Presents the Italian Studies Award Ceremony

The Charles and Joan Alberto Italian Studies Institute is pleased to present THE ITALIAN STUDIES AWARD CEREMONY

Honoring the 2019 Scholarship Awards Winners and Benefactors
and
A Poetry Reading
by  Maria Mazziotti Gillan (Poet) and Carla Francellini (Translator)

Maria Mazziotti Gillan
Maria Mazziotti Gillan

Maria Mazziotti Gillan is the winner of the 2014 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature from AWP, the 2011 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award from Poets & Writers, and the 2008 American Book Award for her book All That Lies Between Us. She is the Founder/Executive Director of the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College, editor of the Paterson Literary Review, and director of the creative writing program/professor of English at Binghamton University-SUNY.

Tuesday, September 24, 2019 @ 6:00 PM
Theatre-in-the-Round (University Center)
Co-sponsored by Seton Hall University Libraries

RSVP: Barbara Ritchie — 973-275-2967 | barbara.ritchie@shu.edu


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‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years

‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 | By Matthew Minor

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Under the dome of Walsh Library hangs a quote from St. John Paul: “Faith and reason are the two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth.” For 25 years, Walsh Library has stood as the cornerstone of Seton Hall’s pursuit of reason within our Catholic values.In 1990, the University’s leadership noted the need for a new library. The Very Reverend Thomas Peterson, O.P., former university chancellor, said, “Seton Hall needs a new library and she needs it now. It must be her star, the jewel of her campus.”Four years later, Walsh Library opened. In the April 28, 1994 edition of the University’s student-run newspaper, The Setonian, then-Dean of Libraries Robert jones called the library dome “‘the outstanding architectural feature of the building.’ [Jones] said the dome is the library’s crowning feature and compared it to the dome of the Library of Congress.”

 

A flyer from University Day 1994
A flyer from University Day 1994

In 25 years, the library has seen much change. Richard Stern, acting dean of University Libraries from 2002-2004, said, “a jewel never changes. But as humans learn, they change the buildings they inhabit to suit their needs.” And so Walsh Library has changed from a place of quiet study to a place of lively academic discussion and socialization. In 2012, Dunkin’ opened on the library’s second floor. In March 2019, an after-hours study space opened for students’ use 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Daniela Gloor, BA ’14/MPA ’15, and her classmates in the University Honors took advantage of the library to blend their studies with this “lively academic discussion and socialization.” Walsh Library “was a place where you bonded with one another while studying, completing assignments, or writing your papers,” Gloor said. “My Honors Program classmates and I anxiously sought to study in the Library Rotunda when it was available, which has a picture-perfect view of campus and is one of the most unique places at Seton Hall. While we likely cannot remember all the works we read and studied, I can certainly recall the environment of the library, many of the memories made there, and the sleepless nights we spent working toward graduation.”

Seton Hall’s community continues to seek out the Library’s resources. In 2019, 66,000 items were borrowed, loaned and/or used, more than 44,000 books were circulated, 20,000 interlibrary loan transactions were fulfilled for books and articles and keys for the group study rooms were used more than 13,000 times.

A model of Walsh Library
A model of Walsh library

Walsh Library has been a witness to the digital revolution that redefined research and study. Former Acting Dean Stern said the library “has grown from an institution where researchers came to find materials to an institution where researchers increasingly conduct all stages of their research in the digital sphere.”

Elizabeth Leonard, Assistant Dean for Information Technologies and Collection Services, said, “When Walsh Library opened in 1994, library technology, like all technology, was in its infancy…we did (yes, really) hand stamp all books going out on loan to patrons.” When the library opened, The Setonian wrote study rooms were “equipped with windows and outlets [which] are designed so students can bring their own computers and plug them into the University system.” Now, wireless laptops and a plethora of new Macs and PCs allow students to study wherever they like.

25 years later, technology touches almost every aspect of the library. In 2019 alone, roughly 427,000 full-text articles were downloaded, users viewed subject guides more than 64,000 times, the library website received 400,000 views and 1.4 million theses and dissertations were downloaded from the library’s collection. The library’s institutional repository, an online database comprising scholarly pieces such as dissertations and theses written by Seton Hall students and faculty, surpassed three million downloads in June 2019. Thanks to technology, Leonard said the library’s “resources are available to authorized users anywhere in the world, whenever they need them. We digitize lectures, books and other materials for virtual use.”

Walsh Library is looking toward the next 25 years of service to the University community. Leonard said, “We are looking forward by preserving born digital materials in a repository that will ensure they are accessible to future generations of librarians and researchers.”

View the library’s online exhibit Walsh Libraries: 25 Years of Learning, here.