WorldCat Discovery To Replace WorldCat Local

WorldCat Discovery to replace WorldCat Local

WoldCat Discovery LogoOCLC, the developer of WorldCat Local, will be retiring the product on August 9, 2019. Access will end on this date, and then all existing WorldCat Local URLs will point to the Seton Hall University Libraries’ WorldCat Discovery service.

So if you have used WorldCat Local in the past, or have it bookmarked on your computer, your link will now automatically re-direct here https://setonhall.on.worldcat.org/discovery. WorldCat Discovery offers a much-improved and more powerful search interface.

If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to:

Sebastian Derry
Assistant Dean for Public Services
Seton Hall University Libraries
sebastian.derry@shu.edu | 973-275-2058

Research Relationships: An Interview with Professor Martin Edwards

Research Relationships: An Interview Seton Hall Professor Martin Edwards

Martin S. Edwards is an Associate Professor & Chair in the School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University, where he teaches classes on International Organizations and Research Methods.

 

You are an award-winning researcher, you publish scholarly books and articles, you teach, are a media commentator and make media appearances. How do you find time to balance all these? How did you know you were any good at any of this?

I don’t think anyone that says that they have balance in work-life or in their career probably really does—I think they are more telling people they have balance.

What I have to do is realize my limits, and realize that there’s a lot of stuff in the news especially in the last couple of years that I could comment on, but there are other people that can certainly comment on these things and so I’m perhaps better off letting some things go. The one thing I do try to do is realize limits and focus on “media things” that are perhaps unfolding or have yet to pass, that I can comment on. So I try to position myself for those things, and that means that I kind of lie fallow for a while.

During the semester balancing teaching and writing that’s always a challenge—I think that’s a challenge for everybody. Some semesters you just have to realize that “I’m just not going to get as much done” and that’s okay. Our class work is important, especially here, we need to take that seriously.

I don’t think I look back and say “Wow I’m really good at this!” I just think I want to try, especially with media stuff right now. There is so much that the public doesn’t understand about what the U.N. does, about international economic policy. I think it should be our responsibility as learned folk to try to communicate and try to explain these things in a simple manner.

A colleague of mine said that at one point in her career she realized what she could do and what she could not do, and I try to do that. So it’s not a question of me being good it’s just a question of saying “this is a priority, this is something I want to invest time in”, and plugging away at it.

Your book came out last December, The IMF, the WTO & the Politics of Economic Surveillance. Can you talk about the book, and how it grew from your research and your interests?

A book is kind of the sine qua non of scholarship. For a while I didn’t realize that what I had was actually book size. But the more I thought about the phenomenon that I was studying the more I realized that there was a book there.

There’s a lot of scholarly work written on the IMF (International Monetary Fund), there’s a lot of scholarly work written on the WTO (World Trade Organization), and there’s lots of stuff we know about both institutions but there are some things that we don’t know. What I tried to do in the book is shed light on those things that we do not know.

So what does that mean? The scholarship on the IMF focuses on lending. For example: Argentina borrows a large amount of money from the IMF—does that loan make a difference? Does it have bad consequences? So that’s a large focus of the scholarship on the fund. On the WTO side a lot of the scholarship focuses on trade disputes. Are countries more likely to win or lose when they take each other to court in the WTO?

But both those institutions have a more mundane day-to-day role of giving countries economic report cards. For the IMF this is done every year. The one for the U.S. was done last July so there’ll be one this July (2019). For the WTO that’s done every 2 years, for large economies. The U.S. was just done in December (2018).

What do these reports look like? Are these reports read by government officials? Do they make a difference in policy? These things are largely understudied. It seemed to me the stuff of what international organizations do is a lot of this day-today monitoring—human rights, finance, environmental issues—that’s an entry point to understand what monitoring looks like.

I had no intention of originally writing on the WTO, but I realized this is an organization that also does the same thing and it might be interesting to compare a financial organization to a trade organization. And the two of them practice the surveillance very differently, so it’s interesting to think “is there a right way or a wrong way to study these sorts of issues? How should we best design international organizations, moving forward?”

Since the book’s publication, what has been the response from either the IMF or the WTO?

 The IMF is reviewing surveillance next year, they do this every couple of years. And I was actually down in Washington D.C. and walking them through what I had found. And what I had found was—which they weren’t very fond of, but that’s okay— that even in a time that you would expect the fund to have an influence which was in 2011, when we’re talking about raising the debt ceiling and that was at the same time one of these reports was coming out, these reports didn’t make a ripple. They weren’t discussed in congress, they weren’t discussed in the media. Similarly for the WTO you would think a lot of our discussions about what the WTO finds about China would be of interest. That also doesn’t make a ripple on Capitol Hill, it doesn’t make a ripple in the media.

IMF staffers weren’t really pleased to be told “Hey, you guys have some work to do.” They do face a basic challenge of how do you explain details about fiscal policy to a citizen audience that isn’t terribly well-versed in economics?

I’m hoping that there’ll be a bit of an impact; they certainly know that I’m watching them. I’m practicing surveillance of their study on surveillance, and so we’ll see what happens.

How reliant are you on the resources and services Seton Hall University Libraries makes available—books, electronic resources, interlibrary loan? 

If we didn’t have these tools, I couldn’t have written this, period. There are a number of ways in which the library helped. Interlibrary loan helps to leverage what we don’t have and get it for us. At one point last spring I had to re-write the literature review of the book, and there were probably about two dozen requests I placed in a day and a half!

I used the Lexis-Nexis database incessantly, because we had to figure out what newspapers said about these reports. That was a vital tool and if we didn’t have it, it’s not clear what I would have been able to do.

I’ve tried to use my email inbox to make my scholarly life easier. I have alerts for journals that come in. When a journal that publishes on the sorts of stuff that I find of interest comes out, I get those tables of contents. I have Google Scholar alerts that track individuals who are writing on these sorts of things, as well as generic searches for “IMF”, “global governance”, “international organizations”.

Those things pop up in my inbox every morning, and it’s an incredibly easy way for me to stay on top of the field. I’m amazed the technology has made this part of my life simpler.

For students who are new to the research and writing process, or your own students, what advice do you give them? How do you guide them so they don’t get overwhelmed?

For me, when I got to where I went to undergrad, where I went to graduate school, one of the first things I did was just go to the library. Just walking around and getting the lay of the building is really important, just so you can see different things.

For many students these are skills that they were never trained at in high school. What I try to do is model best practice—I remind students that it’s important to stay current in the news. I will send them every Monday a list of links, and these are articles I come up with on social media often and send them in an email, and they get to see the stuff that we talked about in class last week, here’s how this maps out. Being literate in the media does not mean reading the news that comes up in your Facebook feed.

The other things I try to do is walk students through what to use and what not to use. Google is a great tool for getting movie times, but as a tool for research it’s not designed that way. I try to walk students through books versus journals. It’s often common that students will think that they need to read books, and sometimes the empirical work that they need to see for a research project is never going to be in a book it’s more likely in an article.

For us the critical partner for us has been the library liaisons. They are willing to work with students one-on-one, and provide backup in ways both large and small for faculty; it makes my job a lot easier. I have graduate students that might not feel comfortable with how libraries work. It’s nice to be able to have a resource that we go back to. I always have the name of our library liaison in my syllabi, as a way to help students connect the dots, and help students realize where one can go to get further help.


Explore previous Research Relationships interviews https://library.shu.edu/researchrelationships

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Institutional Repository Hits 3 Million Downloads

As of the end of the spring 2019 semester, Seton Hall’s Institutional Repository officially surpassed 3 million downloads. The Repository is an online database comprised of scholarly pieces such as dissertations and theses written by Seton Hall students and faculty. University Libraries implemented this electronic resource in 2011 and partnered with Seton Hall Law, allowing worldwide viewers to access these works, download them, and use them for their research.

In less than 2 years, the online library has gained over one million additional downloads, having reached the 2 million download mark in July, 2017. “We are now averaging 600,000 downloads per year, which has doubled from previous years. The infrastructure we have through BePress allows for betters discoverability and search engine optimization of Seton Hall Scholarship around the world,” states Lisa DeLuca, Co-Manager of the Institutional Repository.

Seton Hall’s academic works have been accessed by over 52,600 institutions in over 232 countries. Some of our most highly recognized views come from organizations, companies, and government agencies such as LexisNexis, Facebook Inc., Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Massachusetts General Hospital, US Dept of Justice, New Jersey Department of Transportation, and State of New Jersey – to name a few. Beyond Seton Hall, top users at other academic institutions have come from NYU, Rutgers University, Columbia University, Harvard University, and UCLA. Since the e-Repository enables digital content to be stored and viewed worldwide, most viewers outside of the US are located in the Philippines, the United Kingdom, India, Canada, and China.

Elizabeth Leonard, the Assistant Dean of Information Technologies and Collection Services believes that, “This current milestone, and the speed at which we achieved it, clearly demonstrated the quality of Seton Hall academics, and the value of our Institutional Repository in providing a platform upon which our scholar’s materials may be found.”

The eRepository contains theses and dissertations, open access research journals, departmental research projects, materials from the Petersheim Exhibition and many digital collections from University Libraries Archives and Special Collections Center. To view Seton Hall’s eRepository and begin your research, visit: https://scholarship.shu.edu/


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Supporting Students and Faculty with an Institution-led Publishing Program

Seton Hall University (SHU) serves diverse stakeholders across its three New Jersey campuses by publishing a wide array of academic materials in its institutional repository (IR). From student-led journals, to theses (which currently have 1,467,560 downloads across 192 countries), to campus-wide events such as the Petersheim Academic Exposition, the eRepository @ Seton Hall University seeks to meet faculty and student publishing needs.

We are excited that the number of downloads from the IR is fast approaching 3 million. According to Sebastian Derry, Assistant Dean for Public Services at Seton Hall University Libraries, the eRepository reflects the library’s mission by providing access to theses and dissertations as well as supporting faculty’s interdisciplinary approach to research. Electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) are the most frequently downloaded documents from the repository, with 216,000 downloads from 30,877 institutions in 226 countries. SHU’s press release about reaching the milestone of 2 million downloads in 2017 underlined Derry’s point: “This is significant for the fact that the eRepository allows the University’s research to become a viable worldwide resource.”

Journal publishing

Our institution-led publishing program, managed by the SHU Libraries, includes a journal publishing program for the law school and the wider university. In fall 2018, Locus, a new undergraduate research journal created to feature excellent examples of undergraduate scholarship, was launched by the College of Arts & Sciences. The journal has since been viewed by 52 institutions in 43 countries. This is terrific exposure for students who want to build a digital portfolio, and it gives the editors valuable metrics to better understand their readership. Faculty advisor Nathan Kahl, PhD, Associate Professor of Mathematics, was delighted with the process and has become a fan of the institution-led publishing platform.

Locs Journal of Undergraduate Research logoSHU’s Catholic mission

SHU is a private Roman Catholic University, and the repository also ties into the Catholic mission, which focuses on community service and servant leadership. The open nature of the repository is a great service to the campus, local, and global communities. SHU believes that getting involved in the community teaches lessons that can’t be taught in any classroom. The use of the repository, whether for a student-run journal or a campus-wide event such as the Petersheim Exposition, allows SHU to share scholarship and campus resources. SHU’s commitment to the study of theology is also important. In additional to departmental collections, religion-focused journals include Arcadia: A Student Journal for Faith and Culture and Vocations – A Publication of the Center for Vocation & Servant LeadershipThe Catholic Advocate, the official publication of the Archdiocese of Newark from 1951 to 1987, is currently being uploaded into the repository’s digital collections to preserve our institutional history.

Open access journals

Open access journals are available to student organizations, academic and campus centers and administrative departments.  We have had great success with Political Analysis, a student-run journal which added an online presence to its printed issues in 2016 and has over 15,000 downloads globally. The editors and authors find the dashboard metrics very helpful to determine the global reach of student scholarship.

Political Analysis Journal logoFor more information about creating online journals, see Starting, Publishing, and Sustaining an Online Journal: Beginner’s Workshop which was presented at the Digital Commons Conference at The College at Brockport in 2016. This presentation can help other institutions create a framework to launch open access journals.

Open educational resources

To promote sharing among faculty, we created an Open Educational Resources collection on the repository to highlight projects from our Digital Humanities Committee, which sponsors multiple faculty programs per year.  We have also added faculty assignments that utilized PolicyMap, a GIS Lite mapping tool, from disciplines including anthropology, political science and health care administration. Many of the faculty from these different departments had not met prior to the PolicyMap rollout. Now, because of eRepository, they can track each other’s mapping assignments in their classes. PolicyMap continues to be a thread between departments to improve digital literacy among students and faculty communication through the IR.

Conclusion

The eRepository partners with diverse stakeholders to support faculty and student needs.  The next planned project is a syllabi repository for the School of Diplomacy and International Relations that will reduce paper storage and allow virtual sharing of syllabi. We are also excited to be taking in programs from the History Department’s symposia and more academic materials from across our campuses.  We will continue to work with the Office of Research and Grant Services (OGRS) to promote scholarship output and results for Seton Hall faculty, administrative departments and students.  Regular distribution of IR statistics are sent to university deans in an annual report. These reports showcase the excellent global maps that are created by the Digital Commons dashboard.

Map of theses and dissertations global downloads for Seton Hall University
Map of theses and dissertations global downloads for Seton Hall University

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Kanopy Videostreaming Service Offered By Library For Faculty

Kanopy LogoKanopy, our on-demand streaming video service, is a wonderful resource and we are happy to see it being so well-used.  However, our library materials budget is limited and we cannot sustain the current level of spending. This academic year we have already spent over $14,000 to lease about 90 films (an important note here is that we do not own the films, we only purchase access to each one for one year). In order to continue this service we need to reduce the cost.

Previously, Kanopy films were automatically purchased after 30 seconds of viewing by any user with access to the library, including walk in visitors.

In an effort to eliminate purchases being triggered by casual users and focus on class-related use of the rich academic material included in Kanopy, we have made the following changes:

1. We removed films to which we do not have current access from the catalog. (We used to have all 21,000+ films listed, available for viewing and automatic triggering).

2. Kanopy films to which we do have current access still appear in the catalog for the use of the whole campus community. These will be removed at the end of the one-year subscription period. New films to which we have purchased access are added promptly to the catalog for immediate availability.

3. All films available through Kanopy can still be browsed via the database A-Z list; however, we have added a statement that films can only be requested by faculty:

Kanopy Database Screenshot

4. We moved the Kanopy films listing on Accessing Films at SHU so now Kanopy is part of Streaming for classroom use further supporting the idea that Kanopy films are for academic purposes rather than entertainment. Note that we have other streaming video resources listed there as well.

5. Faculty can browse, search and request Kanopy films directly through the Kanopy interface. Films to which we have access will appear first. To watch or request a video:

          • Click on the film you want, or mouse over it and click on “watch”. If we have access to the film it will open and give a prompt to play it. You will not know if we have access to a film until you click on it – do not assume we have access simply because you see a film’s cover shown on the Kanopy site!
          • Note that you will always see this message at the top of the page, but that does not mean the film is not available—you should be able to play the video:

Limited Access Message

          • If the film is not available, instead of the “play video” or “watch” option you will be prompted to fill in this request form:

Request Form Screenshot

Videos requested by faculty typically will be available within two working days and often less.

If you have questions about Kanopy, please contact:
Acquisitions Librarian Sulekha.Kalyan@shu.edu


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SHU_Libraries Migrating To OpenAthens (OA) Asset Management

OpenAthens Logo

Seton Hall University Libraries is retiring is current authentication system, EZProxy, and migrating to the OpenAthens (OA) Asset Management System, a next-generation method of accessing library databases both on and off campus. OA’s authentication is significantly improved over previous systems, and it will allow us to secure, enable, and monitor access better than ever before. Additionally, the new system will help us provide insights and data that will allow us to better support our faculty and students.

Our anticipated transition date to OpenAthens is Monday, May 20, 2019. While we are not expecting any disruptions in service, we do appreciate your patience with us and with this new access and user authentication system. The Library staff has worked very hard to make Open Athens work and we recognize there may be a few bumps and challenges along the way for our library users.

Please see the OpenAthens FAQs.

If you have questions about authenticating to Seton Hall University Libraries’ library resources, please contact elizabeth.leonard@shu.edu.


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ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research

ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research is a complement to data services provided by Seton Hall University Libraries. The summer programs (most held in Ann Arbor, MI) provide rigorous, hands-on training in statistical techniques, research methodologies, and data analysis. Last year’s workshops included R programming, time series analysis, regression analysis, Bayesian modeling, and longitudinal analysis. These programs are excellent professional development opportunities for graduate students and faculty. As a subscriber, Seton Hall receives a 40% discount on tuition.

DATES
First Session: June 24 – July 19, 2019
Second Session: July 22 – August 16, 2019

Additionally, from May through August 2019, ICPSR will offer dozens of short workshops on a variety of topics in Ann Arbor and other locations around the world which will be posted in January 2019. Official registration for all 2019 courses will open in early February 2019.

2019 Schedule
https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/schedule.html

FEES
https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/registration.html

FINANCIAL AID
The ICPSR Summer Program offers several scholarships that provide registration (tuition) fee waivers for the 2019 four-week sessions.
Please refer to the Financial Support page for more information about how to apply.

Questions about ICPSR @ SHU?
Contact lisa.deluca@shu.edu

PIVOT Database Cancellation

#SHU_Libraries wishes to inform everyone that we will be cancelling our subscription to the PIVOT funding database, effective Sunday, March 31.

Our reasons for cancelling PIVOT include low usage, little interest in maintaining PIVOT from other campus stakeholders, and a significant financial cost to the library to provide access to Pivot.

Anyone who has an active account with PIVOT, will no longer receive funding alerts, and your login access to the database will expire on this date.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause to PIVOT users.

Questions? Please reach out to:

Sebastian Derry
Assistant Dean for Public Services
sebastian.derry@shu.edu |973-275-2058

After Hours Study Space Now Open

#SHU_Libraries At long last we are pleased to announce the opening of the new After Hours Study Space!

The room is adjacent to Dunkin’ Donuts on the library’s 2nd floor:Photo of After Hours Study Space door

How it works:

During the library’s regular operating hours, the room is open and available with entrance/exit only from within the library through the wooden door.

During the library’s overnight hours

                    • 2am-8am Monday thru Friday
                    • midnight Friday thru 11am Saturday
                    • 7pm Saturday thru 11am Sunday

—the room is accessible to current SHU students only, with entrance/exit only from outside the library through the card swipe door located on the walkway:Photo oPhoto of exterior door card swipe readerf exterior door card swipe reader

We hope students make use of the room and support our efforts to make the library more accessible!

Photo of After Hours Study Space interior


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