February Speaker’s Series Event

#SHU_Libraries is pleased to announce the next event in our Speaker’s Series: Critical Issues in Information and Education—

“Pipeline Problem, Discrimination, Or Something Else? Addressing Real-World Diversity and Inclusion in Libraries and Schools.” 

***View a recording of the event here***

When: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 (4:00-5:15pm)

About Our Speakers: 

Image of Elaina Norlin

Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development/Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator at the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL). In her role, Ms. Norlin develops and expands ASERL’s Professional Development programming, including the development of new activities to advance ASERL’s goals for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). “As the ASERL Professional Development/DEI Coordinator, I’m passionate about transforming workplace organizations from dysfunctional to a place everyone feels valued, respected and honored for their unique and special contributions to the organization.”

For ten years, Ms. Norlin served as Executive Director of the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, overseeing significant programmatic growth and community outreach activities. She previously worked for OCLC, the US Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the University of Arizona.

In addition, Ms. Norlin works closely with leaders and educators to develop, implement, and assess programs that support diversity, equity, and inclusion, employee engagement, institutional growth, and workplace culture.

Ms. Norlin earned her Bachelor of Arts in Communications (Advertising) from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, her Master of Library and Information Science is also from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  

Image of John Kummings

J. Kenyon Kummings is the Superintendent for Wildwood Public Schools (WPS). Mr. Kummings has served as the Superintendent for WPS since 2014. Prior to assuming that role he was the elementary school principal for seven years. WPS has a high percentage of economically disadvantaged students and is racially and ethnically diverse. The district is unique in that it continuously has one of the highest percentages of students living in poverty in the state of New Jersey (50%). WPS is the only P-12 Urban district in Cape May County and has been fine tuned to meet the needs of its students given that its demographic consists of large populations of special education students (24%), and English Language Learners (35% Pre-K to 8thGrade).

Mr. Kummings has testified several times before the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and most recently before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools regarding the recruitment of minority education candidates.  His testimony from that day along with the expert testimony of representatives of Educator Preparation Programs (EPP’s) identified that there are systemic barriers to entering EPP’s, many of which are attributed to standardized assessments that are leading to inequitable outcomes.  

Mr. Kummings earned his Bachelor of Arts from Rutgers University, his Masters of Education in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey, and is currently working on a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Rowan University.

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