Walsh Gallery Provides Learning Opportunities for Museum Professions Students

Exterior of the Walsh Library.

 

One of the many gems of Seton Hall University is the Walsh Gallery, located on the first floor of the Walsh Library. For students in the M.A. in Museum Professions program, a graduate program within the College of Communication and the Arts, this gallery serves as an exhibition space, a classroom, and – recently, a space where students can put their learned skills to the test. This past Spring semester students in two courses, Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums and Object Care, used the Walsh Gallery to put theory in practice.

The Walsh Gallery recently held an exhibit titled “Strange Attractors“, which explored how the intersection of art and science have become increasingly connected. The exhibit encouraged visitors to consider ways in which an art-science alliance might contribute to the larger cultural discourse with an emphasis on how visual art can generate insight into subjects generally understood through other means. Students in the Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums course were invited to attend an interdisciplinary panel discussion exploring the alliance between art and science. During the discussion, the artists and scientists on the panel debated topics including artistic value and bioethics, art’s ability to visualize scientific issues such as ocean pollution and disease and the correlation between science, religion and poetics.

Jennifer Hochuli, a current student on the education track, attended the panel discussion and felt this discussion strengthened her understanding of how legal and ethical issues play a role in museum exhibits.

“During our Legal and Ethical course, we talked about how the mix of science and art in museums can create controversies, which often lead to censorship” she shared. “These panelists presented an argument as to how art and science can benefit from each another. Museum professionals need to recognize these benefits and be prepared to use these arguments in defending a controversial curatorial choice.”

Following the Strange Attractors exhibit and panel discussion, students in the Object Care course took part in both the deinstallation and the installation processes in the gallery. Assisting with deinstallation, students worked with the gallery professionals to safely remove artwork, practicing the object handling techniques discussed in class. Nicholas Lambing, a student on the registration track, helped several artists remove their artwork from the walls.

“We discussed all the different techniques of how-to best handle artwork in class,” Lambing shared, “but getting an opportunity to actually work with an artist and practice this techniques was incredibly beneficial. As a future collections manager, having these practical skills will help me better succeed in the field.” Rachel Receuro, another museum registration student in the Object Care course, assisted with the installation process and appreciated the chance to gain hands-on experience in tasks she will be responsible for as a future museum professional.

I helped catalogue the art as it was delivered to the gallery, decided where the works were going to be hung in the show, placed labels, and assisted with lighting,” Receuro shared. “We discussed this process in Object Care, but it is invaluable to have the chance to actually experience and apply all the things we learn and discuss in class.

The course Legal and Ethical Issues in Museums explores current legal and ethical issues in museums such as mission, vision and values, professional codes of ethics, roles and responsibilities of staff and boards, representation, decolonization and censorship. The Object Care course introduces students to issues associated with care, preservation, conservation, history and technique for objects in a wide variety of media including works on paper, paintings, sculptures, textiles, photographs, frames and ethnographic objects.

The Walsh Gallery hosts five shows a year. Students in the exhibition development track use the gallery as the exhibition space for the Producing an Exhibition course. As part of that experience, students curate an exhibition from conception to deinstallation. The previous two student-curated exhibits presented artistic expression of social injustices and the multiple meanings of the color red.

The M.A. in Museum Professions is designed for individuals interested in pursuing careers in museums or related cultural institutions. Students in the program select from one of four professional tracks, including Museum Education, Museum Registration, Museum Management, or Exhibition Development.

The College currently offers three Master’s-level programs, including Museum ProfessionsCommunication, and Public Relations. In addition, four dual-degree options, including three accelerated B.A./M.A. programs and a dual M.A. degree with the School of Diplomacy and International Relations are offered.

For more information about Graduate Studies within the College of Communication and the Arts, please contact Ryan Hudes, Ph.D.

Walsh Gallery Hosting Panel Discussion on Art-Science Dialogues in the 21st Century

#SHU_Libraries The Walsh Gallery will be hosting a Panel Discussion on Art-Science Dialogues in the 21st Century. This  is an interdisciplinary program in association with the exhibition “Strange Attractors” and will be held in Walsh Gallery on Friday, March 8th, 7pm–9pm.

“Strange Attractors” explores the intersection of art and science in our era of increasing interdisciplinary dialogue. Both the panel and exhibition were conceived as an extension of a symposium hosted at New York City’s CUE Art Foundation in November 2017 that addressed ways in which an art-science alliance might contribute to the larger cultural discourse.

Panelists include: Luis Schettino, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Lafayette College; Farzad Mahootian, a philosopher and religious studies scholar and Faculty of Liberal Studies, New York University; and Carrie Rohrman, author of “Choreographies of the Living” and Associate Professor of English at Lafayette College.  The panel will be moderated by Taney Roniger.

The objective of the panel and exhibition is to consider ways in which the arts and sciences might join forces to pursue common goals.  Both are designed to foster a creative space in which students, artists, scholars, and members of the community can engage with art through interdisciplinary frameworks.

The panel discussion and exhibition are free and open to the public.  A full-color catalogue with essays by Taney Roniger and Jeanne Brasile is available at Walsh gallery.  The exhibition is presented with generous support from the internationally renowned The Robert Lehman Foundation and the Essex County Arts Council, through a re-grant of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, A Partner Agency of the National Endowment of the Arts.

Strange Attractors Postcard

“Strange Attractors” Exhibition: January 14 – March 8, 2019

Panel: Friday, March 8th 7pm–9pm

SNOW DATE : Saturday, March 9th 7pm–9pm

Gallery hours: Mon–Fri  10:30am to 4:30pm

Further information on “Strange Attractors” and the Walsh Gallery may be found here.


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Walsh Gallery Director to Present at College Art Association Conference

The Director of the Walsh Gallery, Jeanne Brasile, will travel to New York City this month to present at the College Art Association (CAA) Annual Conference.

Photo of Jeanne Brasile
Jeanne Brasile

The conference, now in its one-hundred-and-seventh year, is the largest professional gathering of art historians, artists, designers, curators and others dedicated to the visual arts. Participants have access to more than three-hundred sessions on topics such as Impressionism, activism and the political role of artists and the arts.

Read the rest of the story at Seton Hall University News [link].


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Walsh Gallery Current Exhibition: Strange Attractors

Walsh Gallery presents Strange Attractors, on view from
Monday, January 14 – Friday, March 8, 2019

Strange Attractors Postcard Front

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 2019, 6:00-8:00 pm

The exhibition features a variety of artists and scientists making art informed by scientific principles. The show is an offshoot of the virtual symposium, “Strange Attractors,” which Taney Roniger organized in 2017 in collaboration with New York’s C.U.E. Art Foundation. The exhibition builds upon the questions and concepts stemming from the symposium on the current state of relations between art and science, and the growing trend towards collaboration between practitioners of these disciplines.

Read Strange Attractors Press Release

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Walsh Gallery Hosts China Federation of Literary and Art Circles

#SHU_Libraries Walsh Gallery Hosts China Federation of Literary and Art Circles

The China Federation of Literary and Art Circles, organized by Tri-Way International Group of Falls Church, VA, recently toured the Walsh Galleries for the purpose of familiarizing themselves with community-based galleries supported by the government. (The Walsh Gallery receives re-grants of federal monies at the county and state levels, while Seton Hall University receives federal funding overall.) Greg Stevens, chair of the Museum Professions graduate program, and Jeanne Brasile, director of the Walsh Gallery and an adjunct professor in the Museum Professions program, led the delegation on a guided tour of current exhibitions and delivered presentations on, among other topics, the changing roles of museums and curators.

Read the rest of the story here

China Federation of Literary and Art Circles

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Walsh Gallery Presents the Opening of Two New Exhibits on November 8

The Walsh Gallery is pleased to present two new exhibits: “Tom McGlynn: Standards,” a new series of paintings comprised of permutations of shape, color and the interplay of these elements, and “Gas Stop: Culture,” black and white photographs by renowned photographer, David Freund.

The opening reception for these exhibits will take place from
5- 8 p.m. on Thursday, November 8 in the Walsh Gallery.

Read the story at

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Current Walsh Gallery Exhibition: “Learning To Fly”

Seton Hall University’s Walsh Gallery presents Learning to Fly: A Celebration of Flight and Exploration. The exhibition commemorates several major anniversaries occurring in 2017, including the 80th anniversary of both Amelia Earhart’s disappearance and the Hindenburg disaster in 1937 as well as the 60th anniversary of the launch of the Sputnik satellite by the Soviet Union in 1957.

Using both historical objects and contemporary art, “Learning to Fly” will examine major themes within aviation history including flight as innovation, power, competition, and entertainment while also exploring New Jersey’s impact on aviation history using these landmark events. Artifacts from the New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame, Cradle of Aviation Museum, Navy Lakehurst Historical Society, Newark Public Library, and the University’s Archives will be featured in the show alongside artwork by Ellie Irons, Dan Phiffer, Greg Leshé, Winifred McNeill, Timothy Pickerell, Chad Stayrook, Lizzy Storm, and Sara Sun.

Curators Derek Butler and Kathlene Williams invite visitors to examine the tremendous role that flight has played in society over the last century.

The Exhibition runs January 17–March 10, 2017

Kiki and Seton Smith: A Sense of Place

The Walsh Gallery, in collaboration with the Lennie Pierro Memorial Arts Foundation, is pleased to present Kiki and Seton Smith: A Sense of Place.

Key to this exhibition is the idea that place irrevocably impacts our sense of self. Kiki’s drawings and prints look to the natural world to understand the relationship between place and identity on a symbolic level. Seton’s large-scale photographs look to the built environment to convey associations by moving within, and navigating through, space. Contextualized in this manner, the artists explore the complex psychological and emotional terrain to be negotiated in understanding the self and the manner in which place becomes a defining characteristic of identity. The fragility of the human condition and the places we traverse in our mortal journey are the narrative impulse of this exhibition.

The Exhibition runs 10/30/16 to 12/9/16.

Join us to see why NJ.com calls this exhibit one “that shouldn’t be missed.”

Read Dan Bischoff’s recent Star-Ledger profile Sister Artists Return to South Orange.

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