‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years

‘The Jewel of the Campus’: Walsh Library Celebrates 25 Years
Wednesday, September 4, 2019 | By Matthew Minor

Exterior of the Walsh Library. Under the dome of Walsh Library hangs a quote from St. John Paul: “Faith and reason are the two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth.” For 25 years, Walsh Library has stood as the cornerstone of Seton Hall’s pursuit of reason within our Catholic values.In 1990, the University’s leadership noted the need for a new library. The Very Reverend Thomas Peterson, O.P., former university chancellor, said, “Seton Hall needs a new library and she needs it now. It must be her star, the jewel of her campus.”Four years later, Walsh Library opened. In the April 28, 1994 edition of the University’s student-run newspaper, The Setonian, then-Dean of Libraries Robert jones called the library dome “‘the outstanding architectural feature of the building.’ [Jones] said the dome is the library’s crowning feature and compared it to the dome of the Library of Congress.”

 

A flyer from University Day 1994
A flyer from University Day 1994

In 25 years, the library has seen much change. Richard Stern, acting dean of University Libraries from 2002-2004, said, “a jewel never changes. But as humans learn, they change the buildings they inhabit to suit their needs.” And so Walsh Library has changed from a place of quiet study to a place of lively academic discussion and socialization. In 2012, Dunkin’ opened on the library’s second floor. In March 2019, an after-hours study space opened for students’ use 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Daniela Gloor, BA ’14/MPA ’15, and her classmates in the University Honors took advantage of the library to blend their studies with this “lively academic discussion and socialization.” Walsh Library “was a place where you bonded with one another while studying, completing assignments, or writing your papers,” Gloor said. “My Honors Program classmates and I anxiously sought to study in the Library Rotunda when it was available, which has a picture-perfect view of campus and is one of the most unique places at Seton Hall. While we likely cannot remember all the works we read and studied, I can certainly recall the environment of the library, many of the memories made there, and the sleepless nights we spent working toward graduation.”

Seton Hall’s community continues to seek out the Library’s resources. In 2019, 66,000 items were borrowed, loaned and/or used, more than 44,000 books were circulated, 20,000 interlibrary loan transactions were fulfilled for books and articles and keys for the group study rooms were used more than 13,000 times.

A model of Walsh Library
A model of Walsh library

Walsh Library has been a witness to the digital revolution that redefined research and study. Former Acting Dean Stern said the library “has grown from an institution where researchers came to find materials to an institution where researchers increasingly conduct all stages of their research in the digital sphere.”

Elizabeth Leonard, Assistant Dean for Information Technologies and Collection Services, said, “When Walsh Library opened in 1994, library technology, like all technology, was in its infancy…we did (yes, really) hand stamp all books going out on loan to patrons.” When the library opened, The Setonian wrote study rooms were “equipped with windows and outlets [which] are designed so students can bring their own computers and plug them into the University system.” Now, wireless laptops and a plethora of new Macs and PCs allow students to study wherever they like.

25 years later, technology touches almost every aspect of the library. In 2019 alone, roughly 427,000 full-text articles were downloaded, users viewed subject guides more than 64,000 times, the library website received 400,000 views and 1.4 million theses and dissertations were downloaded from the library’s collection. The library’s institutional repository, an online database comprising scholarly pieces such as dissertations and theses written by Seton Hall students and faculty, surpassed three million downloads in June 2019. Thanks to technology, Leonard said the library’s “resources are available to authorized users anywhere in the world, whenever they need them. We digitize lectures, books and other materials for virtual use.”

Walsh Library is looking toward the next 25 years of service to the University community. Leonard said, “We are looking forward by preserving born digital materials in a repository that will ensure they are accessible to future generations of librarians and researchers.”

View the library’s online exhibit Walsh Libraries: 25 Years of Learning, here.

Walsh Gallery Hosting Panel Discussion on Art-Science Dialogues in the 21st Century

#SHU_Libraries The Walsh Gallery will be hosting a Panel Discussion on Art-Science Dialogues in the 21st Century. This  is an interdisciplinary program in association with the exhibition “Strange Attractors” and will be held in Walsh Gallery on Friday, March 8th, 7pm–9pm.

“Strange Attractors” explores the intersection of art and science in our era of increasing interdisciplinary dialogue. Both the panel and exhibition were conceived as an extension of a symposium hosted at New York City’s CUE Art Foundation in November 2017 that addressed ways in which an art-science alliance might contribute to the larger cultural discourse.

Panelists include: Luis Schettino, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Lafayette College; Farzad Mahootian, a philosopher and religious studies scholar and Faculty of Liberal Studies, New York University; and Carrie Rohrman, author of “Choreographies of the Living” and Associate Professor of English at Lafayette College.  The panel will be moderated by Taney Roniger.

The objective of the panel and exhibition is to consider ways in which the arts and sciences might join forces to pursue common goals.  Both are designed to foster a creative space in which students, artists, scholars, and members of the community can engage with art through interdisciplinary frameworks.

The panel discussion and exhibition are free and open to the public.  A full-color catalogue with essays by Taney Roniger and Jeanne Brasile is available at Walsh gallery.  The exhibition is presented with generous support from the internationally renowned The Robert Lehman Foundation and the Essex County Arts Council, through a re-grant of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, A Partner Agency of the National Endowment of the Arts.

Strange Attractors Postcard

“Strange Attractors” Exhibition: January 14 – March 8, 2019

Panel: Friday, March 8th 7pm–9pm

SNOW DATE : Saturday, March 9th 7pm–9pm

Gallery hours: Mon–Fri  10:30am to 4:30pm

Further information on “Strange Attractors” and the Walsh Gallery may be found here.


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Walsh Gallery Current Exhibition: Strange Attractors

Walsh Gallery presents Strange Attractors, on view from
Monday, January 14 – Friday, March 8, 2019

Strange Attractors Postcard Front

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 2019, 6:00-8:00 pm

The exhibition features a variety of artists and scientists making art informed by scientific principles. The show is an offshoot of the virtual symposium, “Strange Attractors,” which Taney Roniger organized in 2017 in collaboration with New York’s C.U.E. Art Foundation. The exhibition builds upon the questions and concepts stemming from the symposium on the current state of relations between art and science, and the growing trend towards collaboration between practitioners of these disciplines.

Read Strange Attractors Press Release

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Walsh Gallery Presents the Opening of Two New Exhibits on November 8

The Walsh Gallery is pleased to present two new exhibits: “Tom McGlynn: Standards,” a new series of paintings comprised of permutations of shape, color and the interplay of these elements, and “Gas Stop: Culture,” black and white photographs by renowned photographer, David Freund.

The opening reception for these exhibits will take place from
5- 8 p.m. on Thursday, November 8 in the Walsh Gallery.

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14th Annual Fine Arts Student Exhibition @ the Walsh Gallery

Everyone is invited to experience College of Communication and the Arts’ 14th Annual Fine Arts Student Exhibition @ the Walsh Gallery

AMIBGUITY runs from Thursday, April 5th to Friday, May 11thAmbiguity

The Walsh Gallery is located on the ground floor of Walsh Library.

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Walsh Gallery exhibition is reviewed in Critically Acclaimed Digital Magazine

The Walsh Gallery‘s recent exhibition “Mirrors of Midcentury French Culture” was reviewed in the renowned web magazine, artcritical.

Marguerite Louppe, Les Trois Chevalets, n.d. Oil on canvas, 116 x 89 cm
Marguerite Louppe, Les Trois Chevalets, n.d. Oil on canvas, 116 x 89 cm

The exhibition examined the public and private lives of husband and wife painters, Maurice Brianchon and Marguerite Louppe, both of whom lived and workedin France in the pivotal time leading up to World War II, through the late 1970’s. The exhibition was curated by David Hirsh and William Corwin.

Maurice Brianchon, Bal Masqué, 1948. Oil on canvas, 33 x 55 cm
Maurice Brianchon, Bal Masqué, 1948. Oil on canvas, 33 x 55 cm

Read the review:

http://www.artcritical.com/2018/03/25/charlotta-kotik-on-marguerite-louppe-and-maurice-brianchon/

Maurice Brianchon, Conversation à la Plage, c.1951. Gouache, 32 x 23 cm
Maurice Brianchon, Conversation à la Plage, c.1951. Gouache, 32 x 23 cm

Visit the Walsh Gallery online https://library.shu.edu/walshgallery

 

New Exhibit: The 1916 Easter Rising

Proclaiming a Republic: The 1916 Rising

We are pleased to announce a new exhibit on the 1916 Easter Rising which is being hosted by the Walsh Library Gallery and Archives & Special Collections.

The Easter Rising also known as the Easter Rebellion is perhaps the defining moment in modern Irish history. The Rising set the stage for events that changed the course of Irish history. However, the event itself was hampered by confusion and lack of support. On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916 rebel leader Pádraic Pearse read the Proclamation of the Republic from the front of the General Post Office (GPO) to a small and disinterested group of Dubliners.

Pádraic Pearse
Pádraic Pearse

To learn more, please visit our exhibit on the Easter Rising, Proclaiming a Republic: The 1916 Rising, on the first level of Walsh Library viewable in the display window adjacent the Walsh Gallery.

You can also learn more by reading The Rising: Easter 1916 by Fearghal McGarry. This book focuses on the experiences of the people who participated in the Rising. McGarry uses eye-witness statements to tell the story of the rebels:

The Rising by Fearghal McGarry
The Rising by Fearghal McGarry

Additionally, the Seton Hall University Libraries provide access to some excellent documentaries on the Rising through our Kanopy streaming service. Liam Neeson narrates 1916: The Irish Rebellion a three-part series on the Rising from the Irish perspective. And The 1916 Easter Rising from the Great Courses series, provides the details of Easter week and its aftermath:

1916: The Irish Rebellion
1916: The Irish Rebellion
The 1916 Easter Rising
The 1916 Easter Rising

All books and facsimile images for this exhibit are provided courtesy of the Archives & Special Collections Center and Seton Hall University Libraries.

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Current Exhibits in the Archives & Special Collections Center

Seton Hall University Libraries Archives & Special Collections Center is hosting a pair of exhibits currently on view:

The first is The Newark Uprising of 1967:

This period of civil unrest (between July 12 and July 17, 1967) was a protest by African-American residents in response to various discriminatory practices.  The causes associated with this event can be traced back through a long history of uneasy relations between lawmakers, law enforcement, and local citizens. Click here for more information.

The second is Women of Setonia 1937:

This year marks the 80th anniversary since women first attended lectures or taught courses at Seton Hall.  These trailblazers were part of the now defunct Urban Division established by then College President Monsignor James F. Kelley who provided a more inclusive educational experience for all qualified applicants. Click here for more information.

Kiki and Seton Smith: A Sense of Place

The Walsh Gallery, in collaboration with the Lennie Pierro Memorial Arts Foundation, is pleased to present Kiki and Seton Smith: A Sense of Place.

Key to this exhibition is the idea that place irrevocably impacts our sense of self. Kiki’s drawings and prints look to the natural world to understand the relationship between place and identity on a symbolic level. Seton’s large-scale photographs look to the built environment to convey associations by moving within, and navigating through, space. Contextualized in this manner, the artists explore the complex psychological and emotional terrain to be negotiated in understanding the self and the manner in which place becomes a defining characteristic of identity. The fragility of the human condition and the places we traverse in our mortal journey are the narrative impulse of this exhibition.

The Exhibition runs 10/30/16 to 12/9/16.

Join us to see why NJ.com calls this exhibit one “that shouldn’t be missed.”

Read Dan Bischoff’s recent Star-Ledger profile Sister Artists Return to South Orange.

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