Reconnecting with Each Other in the Current Pandemic

#SHU_Libraries The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted life at Seton Hall as it has for millions of others around the country and the world. In the name of saving lives by practicing social distancing, it has scattered us into our homes around the region and the country. Although we are now physically distant from one another, we remain united as Pirates through our connection to Seton Hall.

Seton Hall Commencement, 1885
Seton Hall Commencement, 1885

To reconnect as a community, we seek your stories of what this time has been like for you. We have established a website to submit short personal narratives. We hope that sharing these stories with one another will bring us back together in a new way, through sharing our personal experiences of this moment. When we move forward, because there will be a time when we move forward, we plan to listen to these stories together as a community, reflect on what we have learned, and let them guide us into the future.

To participate, please record a 1-3 minute narrative about your experience, using any video or audio equipment available to you, and submit the file to our e-Repository.  Please also submit an image that represents your narrative, which will appear next to your recording in the published archive.

Questions to guide your response:

  • What is your day to day life like?  What would you want people in the future to know about what things are like for us now?
  • What has been most challenging about this time?  What do you miss about your life before the pandemic?  Are there specific places or things on campus that you miss?
  • Essential is a word we are hearing a lot right now.  What does essential mean to you?  Who is essential?  What are we learning about what is essential?
  • What is COVID-19 making possible that never existed before?  What good do you see coming out of this moment? How can we re-frame this moment as an opportunity?
  • What is it you want to remember about this time?  What have you learned?
  • After this pandemic ends, will things go back to the way they were?  What kinds of changes would you like to see? How will you contribute to rebuilding the world?  What will you do differently?

Choose the one that speaks to you, or address more than one if you wish.

With thanks to the scholars and librarians who came together to create this project: Professors Angela Kariotis Kotsonis, Sharon Ince, Marta Deyrup, Lisa DeLuca, and Alan Delozier, Technical Services Archivist Sheridan Sayles and Assistant Deans Elizabeth Leonard and Sarah Ponichtera.

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

In conjunction with the Gregory Coates exhibition, the Walsh Gallery and the Walsh Library host Seton Hall’s first ever Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon with support from The Feminist Art Project at Rutgers University.

  Art + Feminism Flyer [pdf]

Attendees will be provided with a list of artists who do not have Wikipedia pages, using the Miriam Shapiro Archive on Women Artists as reference, and with instruction on how to become Wikipedians (editors of Wikipedia) during the course of the workshop. Attendees will be encouraged to use their new skills to create or edit a Wikipedia page, and are welcome to create pages for artists not on the provided list. This event is designed to be flexible so attendees may drop-in and come and go, but we do ask that you register for the event here.

When: Wednesday, February 26th 11a-3p
Where: Beck Rooms A/B | Walsh Library | 1st Floor
Register for the event here.


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Black History Month – Books to Explore

#SHU_Libraries For Black History Month, our Access Services Librarian, Kaitlin Kehnemuyi, has compiled a list of book titles from our collection, below.

The books are on display in the information Commons, 2nd floor of Walsh Library:Black History Month Book Display

She wanted to highlight people who have changed conversations, culture, or attitudes. Hopefully by highlighting historical change we can begin to see the ways people around us are encouraging change right now.

      1. Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture by Ytasha L. Womack (ebook)
      2. Another Country by James Baldwin
      3. Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism by Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley
      4. The Beautiful Struggle: A Memoir by Ta-Nehisi Coates
      5. Black Power 50 edited by Sylviane A. Diouf and Komozi Woodard
      6. Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia E. Butler
      7. Florynce “Flo” Kennedy The Life of a Black Feminist Radical by Sherie M. Randolph
      8. I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr. by Michael Eric Dyson
      9. I Must Resist: Bayard Rustin’s Life in Letters by Bayard Rustin; introduced and edited by Michael G. Long
      10. If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin
      11. Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
      12. Lanterns: A Memoir of Mentors by Marian Wright Edelman
      13. Malcolm X: A Graphic Biography written by Andrew Helfer,  art by Randy DuBurke.
      14. Razor: Revolutionary Art for Cultural Revolution by Amiri Baraka
      15. Seeing Race Again: Countering Colorblindness Across the Disciplines edited by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, Luke Charles Harris, Daniel Martinez HoSang, and George Lipsitz
      16. The World of James Van DerZee: A Visual Record of Black Americans by James Van DerZee; compiled and with an introduction by Reginald McGhee
      17. Thick  and Other Essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom
      18. Unbought and Unbossed by Shirley Chisholm

Give Us Feedback On Our New Website

#SHU_Libraries are looking for a few great people to give us feedback on an updated version of our website. Volunteers will receive a $25 Amazon gift card!

If you are chosen to participate, a librarian will contact you.

Update: thank you students! We had an overwhelming response to our call for volunteers, so we have more than enough.

Thank you for your participation!


Let us know what you think! Send us your comments–Feedback Form
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APA 7th Edition: What’s new?

APA 7th Edition: What’s new?

7th Edition APA Publication Manual

By Kyle Downey, Health Sciences Librarian

Back in October 2019 the American Psychological Association (APA) released the 7th edition of their APA Publication Manual.  It has been nearly a decade since the 6th edition was released and with this newest edition we see several additions and revisions.

So, what is new?

Some changes to the new publication will be immediately noticeable to the user who has used the previous 6th edition.  First, the new manual is in full color throughout the entire publication.  Some other changes include:

          • Citing of online material, with a focus on social media
          • Inclusion of bias-free language
          • Guidelines on writing without bias that addresses age, disability, gender, race and ethnicity, including the singular use of “they”
          • Using shortened URLs and shortDOIs if a URL or DOI is long and complex
          • Removal of publisher locations for books and book chapters
          • An in-text citation with 3 or more authors is to be shortened to include only the first authors name and “et al”
          • Website URLs no longer need to be preceded with “Retrieved from” unless there is also a retrieval date
          • A single space after any body-text punctuation rather than 2 spaces

To learn more about the new publication manual, check out the APA style blog.

Both the Walsh Library and the IHS Library also have permanent reference copies available for faculty and students to use.

Source: Elias, Daniel. “APA Style 7th Edition: What’s Changed?” MyBib, MyBib, 14 Sept. 2019.

14th Annual Jim and Judy O’Brien Capital Markets Colloquium

The 14th Annual Jim and Judy O’Brien Capital Markets Colloquium
will take place Wednesday, February 12th.

Co-Hosted by the Stillman School of Business & Seton Hall University Libraries, the Colloquium will take place in several locations in Walsh Library throughout the day.

Everyone is welcome to attend, but please register!

For complete event details and registration visit https://www.shu.edu/business/capital-markets-colloquium.cfm

Bigger and Better for 2020!

#SHU_Libraries Bigger and Better for 2020!

Welcome back! There are many changes for Walsh Library patrons to improve your experience.

New Furniture in the Information Commons (IC) and Silent Study Room

Over the break we rearranged and added new furniture to the IC and Silent Study room. There are smaller whiteboard tables for group work in the IC and smaller groupings of soft seating. We also created reading and group areas between the reference and curriculum collection. We added more tables to the Silent Study, large and small, in case you like to spread out and silently study! Take a look:

Information Commons

Student Selections

We’ve added a new display area for student selections, between the reference and curriculum collection. It currently features poetry highlights from our collection. These selections are based on a theme and will change monthly, so keep checking back. Patrons are able to check out books that are on display. Take a look:

Student Selections

Loan Periods

Not as visible but with a big impact are the changes to Loan Periods we implemented over winter break. Below are some of the notable changes:

      • EZBorrow books are now available for checkout for 112 days (16 weeks!) no renewal
      • Undergraduates can check out SHU material for 112 days, no renewal
      • Graduate Students and Employees get material for 365 days, no renewal
      • Faculty are 365 days (same loan period), 2 renewals

We wanted to make sure that all patrons were able to take full advantage of resources they need to succeed at Seton Hall.

Our entire circulation policy has been updated online as well.


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Solo Exhibition in Walsh Gallery

GREGORY COATES: SHEER AUDACITY
January 13 – March 6, 2020
Opening Reception: Thursday, January 30th (5pm to 8pm)

#WalshGallery is please to present Gregory Coates: Sheer Audacity, a solo exhibition of recent work by the internationally renowned artist.

A social abstractionist, Coates uses ordinary objects such as feathers, handbags, curtains and shipping pallets to weave stories about his experiences while simultaneously rousing personal associations for viewers with his chosen subjects and materials.  Using art as a catalyst, Coates lures audiences into open-ended conversations to address varying societal concerns.  Audiences are disarmed by Coates’ use of textures, saturated colors and familiar objects that enables them to participate in a politically conscious dialogue that prioritizes their point of view.  Gregory Coates created new work for this exhibition in an homage to the women in his life, and the strength they embody.

The exhibition is curated by Gallery Director, Jeanne Brasile who notes “Coates’ objects are imbued with history, relevance, memory and identity – giving footing for visitors to voice their position on the subjects the artist addresses through his art.”

Programs associated with the exhibition include a Wikithon co-sponsored by the Seton Hall University Libraries, Art+Feminism and the Feminist Art Project at Rutgers University.  Brooke Duffy, Coordinator of Instruction Librarian, organized the event at which attendees will be instructed how to edit or create Wikipedia pages, using the Miriam Shapiro Archive on Women Artists as reference.  The event will take place on Wednesday, February 26th from 11am to 3pm in the Beck Rooms across from the Walsh Gallery.  No advance registration is needed, attendees may come and go during the event at which all are welcome.

The exhibition is supported in part, by a regrant from the New Jersey Council on the Arts/the Essex County Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs.

The Walsh Gallery is open 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday—Friday.

Gregory Coates "My Feminine Side" (detail)