Category Archives: Antibodies & Conjugates

SEMA4D/CD100, a novel target for immune-oncology

Semaphorins are secreted, transmembrane, and glycosylphosphatidylinisotol-anchored glycoproteins that are important in cell to cell signaling. Humans have 20 semaphorins, the most of any species analyzed to date. Their role was originally identified in the development of the nervous system and axonal guidance. Since then, they have been shown to be important in the development and functioning of many tissues including: Continue reading

Daratumumab effective in front-line multiple myeloma

Anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab (Darzalex) is indicated for the treatment or patients with multiple myeloma that have failed prior treatment. CD38 is a Continue reading

MET – an ideal target for antibody drug conjugate therapy, plus nivolumab

MET is a gene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated upon binding with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, or Scatter Factor). Specifically, MET is a Continue reading

Anti-APRIL Antibody BION-1301 for Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Plasma cells are B lymphocytes (B-cells) that have been activated to produce immunoglobulins. When plasma cells become cancerous, the produce copious amounts of immunoglobulins and proliferate in the bone marrow, causing crowding-out of other essential hematopoietic cells, leading to reduced numbers of functioning white blood cells (leukopenia leading to immunosuppression), red blood cells (anemia), and megakaryocytes (thrombocytopenia). Continue reading

CLEC12A – a novel target for AML and MDS

CLEC12 (C-Type Lectin Domain Family 12 Member A) is negative regulator of granulocyte and monocyte functioning. It is a member of the C-type lectin/C-type lectin-like domain (CTL/CTLD) superfamily. It is also known as Myeloid Inhibitory C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor and Dendritic Cell-Associated Lectin. CLEC12 is a cell surface receptor that modulates signaling cascades and mediates tyrosine phosphorylation of target MAP kinases. Continue reading

CD-19 CAR T-cell gets unanimous ODAC recommendation and Blincyto wins full FDA approval – managing cytokine release syndrome

This week, the FDA Oncology Drug Advisory Committee provided a unanimous recommendation to Novartis’ tisagenlecleucel, a CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy directed against CD19 for the treatment of relapsed or refractory (r/r) pediatric and young adult patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).  In addition, the FDA granted full approval to Amgen for Blincyto (blinatumomab), a bispecific monoclonal antibody that targets CD19, for indicated for the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults and children. Blincyto received conditional approval in 2015 for this claim. Continue reading

Platelet conjugates effectively deliver checkpoint inhibitors to tumors

Platelets are the second most abundant cellular component of blood. The platelet membrane contains an abundance of receptors to facilitate interactions with subendothelial matrix , other blood cells, and other platelets. The central role of platelets is in hemostasis, however, they also contain copious amounts of cytokines that induce inflammation. Continue reading

Ublituximab, a novel anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody for CLL

TG Therapeutics is developing ublituximab, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody for patients with CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia). In a phase 3 study in patients with relapsed disease, the combination of ublituximab and ibrutinib (Imbruvica) was superior to ibrutinib, alone – the overall response rates were 80% and 47%, respectively. Continue reading

Xencor’s Bispecific Antibodies in AML and B Cell Malignancies – Ashini R. Dias, Contributor

Most of the antibodies currently used in therapy are monospecific or monoclonal – they specifically target a particular part of an antigen, called an epitope. The heterogeneous nature of the cancer allows frequent mutations and cross-talk among multiple signaling cascades, which ultimately leads to uncontrollable growth and proliferation of the tumor. Thus, antibodies that bind to two different epitopes on the same or different antigens (known as bispecific) are conceptually superior to monoclonal antibodies. The “dual-target” functionality of the bi-specific antibody consisting of two variable domains allows it to bind to multiple surface receptors or ligands in signaling pathways. Although this phenomenon was identified 30 years back, the first bispecific antibody [Removab – catamuxumab: binds to epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on tumor cells the CD3 antigen on T-cells] was approved for therapy in 2009 in Europe for the treatment of malignant ascites after long years of research and development. Continue reading

Neratinib for breast cancer – the key is managing gastrointestinal toxicity

Neratinib is an irreversible tyrosine-kinase inhibitor of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), as well as HER1, HER2, and HER4. It is being developed for patients with breast cancer. It blocks many signal transduction pathways that result in proliferation and invasion, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. (Figures 1 and 2). Continue reading