Orange Tree Stages Springs Eternal 2013

Photo by Robert Day.

Photo by Robert Day.

Once again the Orange Tree Theatre in Richmond, U.K., is proving its commitment to reviving the works of America’s greatest female playwright, Susan Glaspell, with their world premiere of her final play, Springs Eternal, directed by Sam Waters. For those of you who are near or can make the trip to London, Springs Eternal runs until October 19th, and the ISGS will hold a seminar on October 12th featuring Barbara Ozieblo, Emeline Jouve, Linda Ben-Zvi, Sherry Engle, Drew Eisenhauer, Noelia Hernando-Real, and J. Ellen Gainor.

Once again, too, theatre critic Michael Billington in The Guardian has praise for Glaspell and for Walters’ “extremely adroit cast,” including David Antrobus as Stewie, Antony Eden as Bill, Miranda Foster as Harry, Stuart Fox as Owen, Julia Hills as Margaret, Lydia Larson as Dottie, Jeremy Lloyd as Jumbo, Auriol Smith as Mrs. Soames. The Theatre Guide London calls the play “a small gem well worth the rediscovery. As ever, Sam Walters directs with grace and fluidity on the in-the-round stage of which he is a master and … gets  first-rate performances from his entire cast.” To read more go to Links page on this site and click on Orange Tree.

Barbara Ozieblo, from the University of Malaga, will open the seminar at the Orange Tree on October 12 with a brief introduction to the origins of the Provincetown Players and the first two seasons. Emeline Jouve, from Champollion University and Toulouse II University, will continue with a short history of the Provincetown Players. Linda Ben-Zvi, Professor emeritae from Tel Aviv and Colorado State Universities, will focus on George Cram Cook, whose dream of a modern American theatre gave birth to the group. The seminar will then focus on two of the main highlights of the Provincetown Players: Sherry Engle, from Borough of Manhattan Community College will talk about the women of the group and Drew Eisenhauer, from Coventry University, about the father of American drama, Eugene O’Neill. The last part of the seminar will deal with Susan Glaspell and the theme of war. Noelia Hernando-Real, from the Instituto Franklin and the University Complutense of Madrid, will talk about the Provincetown Players and the theme of war and Glaspell’s treatment of war in her plays, a theme J. Ellen Gainor, from Cornell University, will develop as she explores Susan Glaspell’s Springs Eternal.

 

Shaw Festival in Ontario Produces Trifles 2013

Kaylee Harwood as Mrs. Peters and Julain Molnar as Mrs. Hale in Trifles. Photo by Michael Cooper.

Kaylee Harwood as Mrs. Peters and Julain Molnar as Mrs. Hale in Trifles. Photo by Michael Cooper.

Billed as “two gripping marital mysteries by two playwrights who helped bring modern drama to America,” the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lakes, Ontario, presents Glaspell’s Trifles on the same bill as Eugene O’Neill’s A Wife for a Life from May 29 to October 12 at the Court House Theatre as part of their “lunchtime one-acts” program.

Now in its 52nd season, with 10-12 productions each year performed in four theatres for an audience of more than 250,000, the Shaw Festival is a Canadian cultural icon, producing a diverse mix of plays from the past and present, performed by their talented Acting Ensemble. This production is directed by Meg Roe and designed by Camellia Koo, with lighting designed by Louise Guinand and music composed by Alessandro Juliani. It features Kaylee Harwood as Mrs. Peters, Julain Molnar as Mrs. Hale, Benedict Campbell as Mr. Hale, Jeff Irving as the attorney, and Graeme Somerville as Mr. Peters.

Comments from Daina Giesler, a theatre director who saw Trifles and A Wife for Life:
“At the Shaw, the set was the same for both plays (an artistically old, grey, dim cabin, very bare) with only small prop changes. It was in one of the smaller theatres with a 3/4 thrust so the audience could feel like they were inside. The plays worked quite well together — both with characters in isolated areas and with secrets, and because the main focus of both was ‘the wife’ that was spoken of and yet never seen, except by the description of others who seemed not to really know “her”… The actors were excellent and so was the response, but it seemed to me they were both shorter than I remembered them — with only 50 minutes for the two.”

To read more go to shawfest.com or to the Links page on this site and click on Shaw Festival link.

 

2013 Business Meeting Minutes

Friday, May 25, 2013, at the ALA Conference, Boston.

In attendance: Cheryl Black, Martha Carpentier, Sharon Friedman, Noelia Hernando-Real, Basia Ozieblo, Michael Winetsky.

1) Martha Carpentier, on behalf of the International Susan Glaspell Society, thanked Sharon Friedman for organizing the “Theatre of Engagement” panel and Cheryl Black for organizing the concert reading of “Performing Bohemia.” She awarded Noelia Hernando-Real with a travel grant unanimously approved by the Executive Council.

2) Winner of Best Published Paper prize:

Noelia Hernando Real, “Sane Enough to Kill: On Women, Madness, and the Theatricality of Violence in Susan Glaspell’s The Verge.” Violence in American Drama: Essays on Its Staging, Meanings and Effects. Eds. Alfonso Ceballos Muñoz, Ramón Espejo Romero and Bernardo Muñoz Martinez. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011.

3) President’s Report:

Martha summarized ISGS conference activities and publications since the last business meeting in 2011. The impressive list includes Drew Eisenhauer and Brenda Murphy’s Intertextuality in American Drama: Critical Essays on Eugene O’Neill, Susan Glaspell, Thornton Wilder, Arthur Miller and Other Playwrights (McFarland, 2013 which includes seven articles on Glaspell) and Noelia Hernando-Real’s Self and Space in the Theater of Susan Glaspell (MacFarland, 2011), dissertations (by Emeline Jouve, Ling Jian-e, and Michael Winetsky), performances, readings, and papers at the International Conference on Theatre and Drama (Seville 2012) and the Justice Served Symposia (MU, 2012). Cheryl Black announces that Milbre Burch won a prize for her piece “Sometimes I Sing” and that she got another prize for producing the Justice Served Symposia. Martha reminded us all  that the website is a blog, so that we can all share our accomplishments. We continue to accomplish the goals stated in the Society mission statement, increasing the visibility of Glaspell and her work in both academic and theatre communities. There is one issue that, however, worries us all and it is the diminishing number of members. There are 45 members now, after a high of 70 in 2010, and Martha reminded us all to keep recruiting in mind, particularly among graduate students. Martha announced that together with Noelia she will check if we are eligible and how to apply to MLA as a subgroup, since this would increase visibility, and hence numbers.

Martha informed the group about Chad Coffman, a college student and Davenport native who discovered a four page-story by “Susie Glaspell” hand-written in Feb 1893 titled “The Holy Grail: The Story of Sir Percival’s Sister” in the Davenport Public Schools archives. Martha showed copies of the original and her transcription. Martha added that Coffman believes he has discovered Glaspell’s birth house at 502 Cedar Street, which had been thought lost.

Martha informed us that our nomination of Glaspell didn’t make the cut for the National Women’s Hall of Fame, a lengthy application that was spearheaded by Ellen and prepared by Ellen, Noelia, Cheryl, Basia, and Martha.  They automatically roll unsuccessful nominations over to the next cycle for re-consideration (every two years, hence 2015).  Martha suggested that we use excerpts from this piece to update Wikipedia, which has gaps that could use filling in by the ISGS. Noelia noted that since it will be re-considered again, we should wait to use this material rather than publishing it online. Michael Winetsky affirmed he has been working on the Wikipedia and he will continue to do so.

4) Vice-President’s Report:

Noelia focused on the status of the Literary Encyclopedia entries, pointing to all the entries that need to be written.

Entries published between 2011 and the present meeting include Emeline Jouve’s Springs Eternal and Chains of Dew, Milbre Burch’s Chronology, and Michael Winetsky’s The Glory of the Conquered. Linda Ben-Zvi is working on Free Laughter, Sherry Engle on The Comic Artist, Drew on Lifted Masks and Michael Winetsky on Judd Rankin’s Daughter.

Cheryl is going to ask a student of hers to write the entry on Bernice, and Martha will write the entries on Norma Ashe and Ambrose Holt and Family, and she will ask a student of hers to do The Morning is Near Us and Mary Papke to write on The Visioning. Martha will also ask Patricia Bryan about writing the entry on Her America.

Additional Notices:

5) Martha announced the world premier of Springs Eternal scheduled for this September/October at the Orange Tree Theatre in London. Director Sam Waters finds the play very moving, and he’s very excited about finally bringing this work to the stage. He’ll also do a reading of Bernice at some point during the run. Thanks to J. Ellen Gainor for this great news. Noelia suggested asking Sam whether he would be interested in letting us organize a seminar as we did last time. Everybody finds this a good idea and Basia will ask Sam personally next June.

6) Martha mentioned briefly the progress of Emeline Jouve’s and her plans for Susan Glaspell’s Trifles and “A Jury of Her Peers”: A Centennial Celebration. Martha informed us of contributors who have already been accepted and noted that the CFP is still open until the end of June.

 7) Plans for the P’town Players and Trifles Centennial Conference:

The group decided to work with the Eugene O’Neill Society and set the Trifles centennial in 2016, when Trifles was first produced and Eugene O’Neill became a member. Also we agreed to assist Jeff Kennedy, EONS incoming President, in planning an event in P’town in the summer of 1915 to celebrate the beginning of the PPs themselves.

We agreed to form an “Ad Hoc Centennial Conference Planning Committee” to aid the ISGS Executive Council in planning the conference: to include Cheryl Black, Linda Ben-Zvi, J. Ellen Gainor, and Michael Winetsky.

It is set that the ideal place for our centennial is NYC, as it worked out so beautifully last time. We will count on Sharon Friedman’s help with space in the Gallatin School, and Jeff Kennedy has affirmed that he will be able to get the Playhouse again. The date will be towards the end of June. Martha and Noelia presented some topics for panels and asked the members to keep thinking about topics and to volunteer to chair panels. Some of the topics discussed were:

– Panel on biography (to be chaired by Basia)

– Panel on Jury’s publication history (to be chaired by Martha)

– Panel on Trifles/Jury and law (possibly to be chaired by Patricia Bryan)

– Panel on adaptations (film, theater, etc; to be chaired by Sharon)

– Panel on Intertextualities: Susan Glaspell/Eugene O’Neill (to be co-chaired by Noelia and a member of the Eugene O’Neill Society)

– Panel on Heterodoxy (possibly to be chaired by Blanche Wiesen Cook)

– Roundtable on Trifles in performance (possibly to be chaired by Sherry Engle)

Cheryl agreed to work on a script. It was also suggested that we could entice a local NYC theater group (some suggestions were the Mint or Metropolitian theaters) to do Trifles and Bound East for Cardiff, and that Milbre Burch could do her piece “Sometimes I Sing”. Jeff Kennedy also may assemble “notables,” such as the Gelbs and Tony Kushner, for a reading of these two pieces.

We still have to think about keynote speakers and contact them. Martha reminded us that J. Ellen Gainor may try to get Elaine Showalter, and Sharon offered to contact Carol Gilligan.  Financial support for such an eminent speaker must be addressed.

Intertextuality in American Drama: Critical Essays on Eugene O’Neill, Susan Glaspell, Thornton Wilder, Arthur Miller and Other Playwrights (McFarland 2013)

Eisenhauer and Murphy edEdited by ISGS and Eugene O’Neill Society members and theater scholars Drew Eisenhauer and Brenda Murphy, this anthology provides a wide range of new essays on such diverse American dramatists as Eugene O’Neill, Susan Glaspell, Thornton Wilder, Arthur Miller, Maurine Dallas Watkins, Sophie Treadwell, and Washington Irving. The essayists offer numerous approaches to intertextuality: the influence of the poetry of romanticism and Shakespeare and of histories and novels, ideological and political discourses on American playwrights, unlikely connections between such writers as Miller and Wilder, the problems of intertexts in translation, the evolution in historical and performance contexts of the same tale, and the relationships among feminism, the drama of the courtroom, and the drama of the stage. The anthology includes the following new essays on Glaspell’s work:

Friedman, Sharon. “‘What There Is Behind Us’: Susan Glaspell’s Challenge to Nativist Discourse in Stage Adaptations of her Harper’s Monthly Fiction.”

Hagen, Lisa Hall. “Female Playwrights, Female Killers: Intersecting Texts of Crime and Gender in Glaspell, Watkins and Treadwell.”

Hernando-Real, Noelia. “On Closets and Graves: Intertextualities in Susan Glaspell’s Alison’s House and Emily Dickinson’s Poetry.”

Jouve, Emeline. “Intertextual Insanities in Susan Glaspell’s The Verge.”

Lasik, Franklin J. “Looking for Herland: Embodying the Search for Utopia in Susan Glaspell’s The Verge.”

Winetsky, Michael. “‘Trailing Clouds of Glory’: Glaspell, Romantic Ideology and Cultural Conflict in Modern American Literature.”

Withers, Sarah. “Intertextuality on the Frontier in Susan Glaspell’s Inheritors.”

Print ISBN:  978-0-7864-6391-6
Ebook ISBN: 978-1-4766-0140-3

To order: http://www.mcfarlandbooks.com/book-2.php?id=978-0-7864-6391-6

 

24th Annual American Literature Association Conference 2013

images“The Theater of Engagement: The Provincetown Players and the Great War”
Chaired and organized by Sharon Friedman, Gallatin School, NYU

In their interdisciplinary study 1915: The Cultural Moment, Adele Heller and Lois Rudnick observe that progressive groups in New York’s Greenwich Village devoted to creating “a millennium of social peace and justice on American shores, faced the paralyzing horror of the Great War, now entering its second of four years.” Many involved in the Provincetown Players, one of the most important cultural institutions of the Village during this period, along with the radical faction of the Liberal Club, the revolutionary publication The Masses, and the discussion group Heterodoxy, were haunted by the war in Europe and the growing involvement of the United States, the imposition of the draft law, the persecution of dissenters, the Espionage and Sedition Acts, and ultimately the “Red Scare.” Among the diverse stylistically and thematically avante garde works produced by the Players are plays that give dramatic voice to the war issues debated among these and other groups during this period.

This panel includes papers that bring a historical, cultural, and textual analysis to, for example, Eugene O’Neill’s The Sniper (1915), Rita Leo’s (Wellman) The Horrors of War (1915), Edna St. Vincent Millay’s Aria de Capo (1918), or Susan Glaspell’s Inheritors (1921). The papers discern a dialogue between the drama and essays, magazine articles, treatises, manifestos, political rally documents, autobiographical writing or fiction generated by such groups and figures.

Papers presented include:

1. “‘The War Bill’: War on the Stage of the Provincetown Players,” Jeffery Kennedy, Arizona State
University
2. “WWI, Gender Politics, and the Stage as Pulpit: (Anti)War Plays by Women of the Provincetown and
Commercial Theatre,” Pam Cobrin, Barnard College
3. “‘The Gesture’ of Protest: Susan Glaspell and American Idealism in 1917,” Martha C. Carpentier,
Seton Hall University
4. “‘The Play is the Thing’: Feminist (Meta)theatre of Engagement” in Edna St. Vincent Millay’s War Play
Aria da Capo,” Noelia Hernando-Real, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Justice Served Symposia at MU 2012

Patricia Bryan at MUProf. Cheryl Black directed Trifles and Milbre Burch presented her original monologue directed by Emily A. Rollie, “Sometimes I Sing,” a moving sequel to Trifles, as part of a triple bill including a new adaptation by cfrancis blackchild of Zora Neale Hurston’s “Sweat” entitled “The Devil’s Own” and directed by Laura M. Nelson, all under the umbrella title “Justice Served.” The interdisciplinary symposia at University of Missouri featured visiting scholars Patricia L. Bryan (Chapel Hill), ISGS member and author of Midnight Assassin: Murder in America’s Heartland, and Hurston biographer Valerie Boyd (University of Georgia). The performances were sold out and the postshow discussions, led by Bryan and Boyd, were fabulous! MU faculty from the Law School, School of Journalism, School of Social Work, English and Women’s and Gender Studies Depts. attended and participated in the discussions. The Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival respondent raved, and the students in the casts felt like they were part of something very special and important.

Pioneering Women Producers

J. Ellen Gainor lectured on Glaspell at an event hosted by the League of Professional Theatre Women on Monday, May 14, 2012 at the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, 365 Fifth Avenue @ 35th Street, New York City.
The documentary film, “Sweet Tornado: Margo Jones and the American Theater,” was shown, followed by a Q&A and a panel. Ellen’s panel also featured Helen Sheehy on Eva Le Gallienne, Wendy Anne Vierow on Margaret Webster, and Susan Quinn on Hallie Flanagan, followed by a reception.

For more information…

Self and Space in the Theater of Susan Glaspell (McFarland 2011)

Published by McFarland, Noelia Hernando-Real’s exploration of eleven Glaspell plays written between 1915 and 1943 focuses on one of her major themes, the interplay between place and identity. Hernando-Real examines the means Glaspell employs to engage her characters in proxemical and verbal dialectics with the forces of place that turn them into victims of location, and her characters’ attempts to escape the influence of territoriality and shape identities of their own.
Print ISBN: 978-0-7864-6394-7
EBook ISBN: 978-0-7864-8832-2
To order:
http://www.mcfarlandpub.com/contents-2.php?id=978-0-7864-6394-7

Hernando-Real has also recently published “Sane Enough to Kill: On Women, Madness, and the Theatricality of Violence in Susan Glaspell’s The Verge” in Violence in American Drama. Essays on Its Staging, Meanings and Effects. Eds. Alfonso Ceballos Muñoz, Ramón Espejo Romero and Bernardo Muñoz Martinez. Also published by McFarland.

4th International Conference on American Drama and Theater

May 28-30, 2012, Seville, Spain. Noelia Hernando-Real chaired the International Susan Glaspell Society panel, featuring the following papers: “Nora in America: Ibsen’s A Doll House as Intertext within a Tradition of Feminist Bildungsdrama in Plays by Eulalie Spence, Dawn Powell, Rachel Crothers, and Susan Glaspell” by Cheryl Black, University of Missouri, USA; “Why Do We Three Go Apart?: Love, The Mind-Body Problem, and Trajectories in Glaspell’s Oeuvre” by Michael Winetsky, CUNY, USA; “Some Challenges in Translating Suppressed Desires into Spanish” by Nieves Alberola Crespo, Jaume I University, Castellón, Spain. A large contingent of Glaspellians attended this conference hosted by the University of Seville in beautiful Andalucia, Spain! 

2011 Business Meeting Minutes

Saturday, June 25, 2011, at the Eugene O’Neill International Conference, Gallatin Building, NYU, New York City.

In attendance: Cheryl Black, Martha Carpentier, Drew Eisenhauer, Sherry Engle, Sharon Friedman, J. Ellen Gainor, Noelia Hernando-Real, Basia Ozieblo, Michael Winetsky.

1) Martha Carpentier, on behalf of the Susan Glaspell Society, thanked Sharon Friedman for organizing all the events of the SGS at the conference.

2) Winners of Best Conference and Best Published Paper prizes were announced:

Best Published Paper:

Michael Winetsky, “A Playwright of Pragmatism: Susan Glaspell’s Unity of Science and Religion,” Ecumenica Journal of Theatre and Performance, Spring 2009 (unanimous decision).

Best Conference Paper:

Sarah Withers, “Intertextuality on the Frontier in Susan Glaspell’s Inheritors,” given at ALA 2010, chair Drew Eisenhauer.

3) President’s Report:
Martha summarized SGS conference activities and publications since the last business meeting in 2009, an impressive list including books, performances, readings, and papers at ALA Boston, the International Conference on American Drama (Kean University, Union NJ), ATHE Los Angeles, and ALA San Francisco. We continue to accomplish the goals stated in the Society mission statement, increasing the visibility of Glaspell and her work in both academic and theatre communities. Remarkable performances include The Verge and Trifles at the Ontological-Hysteric Theater, with talkbacks with Sharon Friedman and J. Ellen Gainor; John Bilotta’s opera version of Trifles – libretto by John F. McGrew – which premiered at the 10th Annual Fresh Voices Festival; and Off-Off Broadway Zephyer Rep presented Chains of Dew, based on Cheryl’s adaptation, at the Wings Theater, NYC. Martha asked Cheryl to submit a brief report on this production to the website. Martha also suggested those who attend performances and panels leave constructive comments on the website, which is now a blog in which comments can be submitted to any post. Cheryl announced that she will direct Trifles next March at Missouri, and that Milbre Burch will perform her piece on Trifles.

Michael Winetsky said that the Five Drama Societies did not meet at ALA Boston, and that ALA is thinking about leaving the San Francisco and Boston intercalary conferences.

4) Membership and Finance Report:

Martha read Doug Powers’ report. Membership is up to 47 members. Martha highlighted that our paper prizes have attracted younger people, and that the graduate students who attended ALA also joined. Martha thinks we are doing fine in encouraging younger members. It is suggested that new members be welcomed personally by email.

Martha suggested that paying dues biannually may make things easier, particularly for non-US members. Martha reminded us that Seton Hall does not support PayPal, and is not likely to. Sharon wondered whether paying annually is psychologically sound. It was finally decided to keep the annual dues payment. Martha uploaded a membership renewal pdf online, so that members can print it out and send it to Doug with a check.

5) Vice-President’s Report:

Noelia focused on the status of the Literary Encyclopedia entries, pointing to all the entries that still need to be written.

Sharon will write the entry on Bernice, Sherry will do The Comic Artist, and, following Basia’s suggestion, Linda Ben-Zvi will be asked to write the entry on Free Laughter. Martha will write the entry on Norma Ashe, Michael Winetsky will do Judd Rankin’s Daughter, and Drew Lifted Masks. Martha will ask Patricia Bryan about writing the entry on Her America and Sarah Withers about doing Fidelity. Cheryl will ask Milbre Burch to build Glaspell’s chronology.

Noelia informed the group about the 4th International American Drama Conference to be held in Seville, May 20-30 2012. Noelia wants to put together a SG panel, and Cheryl suggested The People for the staged reading.

J. Ellen Gainor updated us on the status of the NWHF application written by Ellen, Basia, Martha, Cheryl and Noelia. This coming December is the end of the two-year cycle. If our application fails, we can get feedback to try again. Martha suggested that the SG entry on Wikipedia be replaced by the content of our NWHF form. Basia suggested waiting until the NWHF committee says something about Glaspell’s nomination, and her suggestion was unanimously accepted.

6) Webmaster’s Report:

Martha insisted that the new site is a blog, so we should all participate and keep it alive, especially the teaching blog which she added at members’ request.

Volunteers are needed to accomplish certain online tasks. Michael Winetsky volunteered to compose a list of links to online sources for Glaspell’s primary texts. Michael Winetsky also volunteered to create a SGS Facebook page, and to prepare a documentary on Susan Glaspell.

7) First item of business:

Martha proposed changing the name to “International Glaspell Society”. Since this will mean changing the wording of the by-laws, as per Article IV Section 4, this must be endorsed by the Executive Council and then go to the membership via e-mail for a vote of at least two-thirds in favor to pass.  The proposal passed unanimously by the Executive Council.

8) Future Plans:

The next Election will take place in 2012. Martha asked Judith Barlow to conduct the election via e-mail as in previous years. Martha will run for a second term as President; Noelia as Vice-President; hopefully Doug also as Membership and Finances Officer. Martha reminded us that there are no term limitations on Executive Council members as per by-laws, so the existing members could run again.

Next ALA will be in San Francisco in 2012. Sharon suggested Monica Stufft to chair a panel, or maybe Michael Winetsky. Cheryl says she is still thinking about ATHE and ATDS 2012.

Martha proposed holding a Susan Glaspell Conference at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, in August 2013, three days and four nights. Member Kirsten Shepherd-Barr is willing to be an onsite liaison. We need a minimum of 20 people to make it possible. Basia suggested a topic wide enough should be presented to bring in other scholars. Sharon suggested something like “Susan Glaspell and her Contemporaries: Globalism, Transnationalism and War.” Noelia will e-mail all members asking for panel proposals. Michael Winetsky suggested that we could hold a symposium, where sessions do not overlap, rather than a conference. Since this is an expensive event, Martha suggested using some of the society money to help some people attend or, as Basia pointed out, to lower the rate a little for everyone. The event will be made public in the US and abroad. Sherry will help through her British colleagues, especially Susan Croft. Everybody agreed this conference is a very good idea and that the next Business Meeting can be held at this conference.

Sharon and Ellen suggested holding an interdisciplinary conference to celebrate the centenary of Trifles in 2016. They envision attracting high profile speakers such as Elaine Showalter and Carol Gilligan. They think that, although expensive, NYC would be a good place to hold it, particularly since we have access to the Gallatin Building and theatre (thanks to Sharon) during the summer. However, another option may be Provincetown. Everybody agreed the SGS should honor this centenary and we will work on developing plans after the St. Catherine’s conference.