The IHS Library is Reopening!

The Interprofessional Health Sciences Library will reopen on Monday, August 24 at 6:30am, with modifications in place to conform with state guidance on reopening libraries.

Seating in the library has been significantly reduced to ensure physical distancing, and many of the desktop computers have been removed. Study rooms can only have one occupant at a time.

We want our library users to be aware of how we need your help to remain open and not be a source of new infections. Please see our New IHS Library Rules below.

Operating hours for the IHS Library will be limited and subject to change. Our hours will be: 

Monday – Friday, 6:30 am – 9pm
CLOSED on Saturdays and Sundays

Even though our library will look and feel a bit different, we are so excited to reopen and get to see you all soon!

Racism is a Public Health Issue

Racism is a public health issue. Here is a selection of eBooks and other resources on race and antiracism  for the healthcare student, professional, and community at large.

eBooks on Race and Medicine

Antiracism eBooks

Videos

Other Resources

Special thanks to Brooke Duffy (Seton Hall University Libraries) and Matthew Noe (Harvard Contway Library) for their work on compiling these resources.

Call for Submissions: COVID-19 Oral History Project

COVID-19 oral history call for submissionsTo reconnect as a community during the COVID-19 pandemic, SHU University Libraries seek your stories of what this time has been like for you. We hope that sharing these stories with one another will bring us back together in a new way, through sharing our personal experiences of this moment.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Please record a 1-3 minute narrative about your experience, using any video or audio equipment available to you, and submit the file to our e-Repository (Under “Author Corner”: Submit Contribution in the left column. If you don’t have an account, you will need to create one).  Please also submit an image that represents your narrative, which will appear next to your recording in the published archive.

Questions to guide your response:

  • What is your day to day life like? What would you want people the future to know about what life is like for us now?
  • What has been most challenging about this time? What do you miss about your life before COVID-19? Are there specific places or things on campus that you miss?
  • Essential is a word we are hearing a lot right now. What does essential mean to you? Who is essential? What are we learning about what is essential?
  • What is COVID-19 making possible that never existed before? What good do you see coming out of this moment? How can we re-frame this moment as an opportunity?
  • What is it you want to remember about this time? What have you learned?
  • After this pandemic ends, will things go back to the way they were? What kinds of changes would you like to see? How will you contribute to rebuilding the world? What will you do differently?

With thanks to the scholars and librarians who came together to create this project: Professors Angela Kariotis Kotsonis, Sharon Ince, Marta Deyrup, Lisa DeLuca, and Alan Delozier, Technical Services Archivist Sheridan Sayles and Assistant Deans Elizabeth Leonard and Sarah Ponichtera.

Information Resources on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Update (2.28.2020): We’ve migrated the below information to the Information Resources on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) toolkit. This toolkit will be updated as additional resources and information is published.

The IHS Library recommends consulting the following resources for factual, up-to-date information on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Health Agency Information:

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention): Contains information about what you should know about the Coronavirus, situation updates, including a list of locations of confirmed cases, and information resources for travelers and healthcare professionals.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak (World Health Organization): Contains rolling updates about the disease outbreak, as well as important myth-busters to stop the spread of false information. You may also wish to take the WHO e-learning module, Emerging respiratory viruses, including COVID-19: methods for detection, prevention, response and control.

Research Resources:

2019-nCoV (PubMed): A preformulated search will bring up the latest research from the National Library of Medicine’s PubMed Database.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (JAMA): JAMA Network’s updates on coronavirus diagnosis and treatment, along with recent articles.

Novel Coronavirus Information Center (Elsevier): Elsevier is providing free health and medical research on COVID-19, which includes access to the Coronavirus Research Repository.

Information for Patients:

Coronavirus Infections (MedlinePlus): MedlinePlus is a service of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), which provides quality, plain-language information for patients.

New Artwork Unveiled at the IHS Library

Neuron art print
“Neuron” by Andrea P. Tóth.

Earlier this month, twelve colorful anatomy prints were permanently installed in various locations throughout the library. The mixed-media watercolor and ink designs are by Prague artist and medical doctor, Andrea P. Tóth, owner of the small-business MedPapers.

When the IHS Library opened in July 2018, the space was beautiful- but the white walls were noticeably in need of artwork. Looking for help on this huge project, the IHS Library consulted with the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine’s Art and Medicine student group for design inspiration. Toth’s prints were ultimately selected for the library for their color, creative interpretation of the human body, and tone of calmness.

So far, the prints have been a huge hit with everyone, especially IHS Library Director, Chris Duffy. “We couldn’t be happier with how these beautiful prints look in our library,” he says. “I hope you enjoy them as much as we do!”

Information Commons
Six prints adorn one wall of the Information Commons.
Neuron synapse art
“Neuron Synapse” by Andrea P. Tóth.

A new look for the IHS Library homepage

the redesigned library homepage
The redesigned library homepage

You’ve probably noticed the IHS Library homepage looks a little different than it has. We have redesigned the homepage to streamline and simplify it, giving you faster and easier access to the content you use most frequently.

Most significantly, we have reduced the number of links in the Popular Resources section of the page. The good news is that all the content that was formerly linked in this section is still available to you using the eBooks, eJournals, and Databases links.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns regarding the new design.

 

APA 7th Edition: What’s new?

APA 7th EditionBy Kyle Downey, Health Sciences Librarian

Back in October the American Psychological Association (APA) released the 7th edition of their APA Publication Manual.  It has been nearly a decade since the 6th edition was released and with this newest edition we see several additions and revisions.

So, what is new?

Some changes to the new publication will be immediately noticeable to the user who has used the previous 6th edition.  First, the new manual is in full color throughout the entire publication.  Some other changes include:

  • Citing of online material, with a focus on social media
  • Inclusion of bias-free language
  • Guidelines on writing without bias that addresses age, disability, gender, race and ethnicity, including the singular use of “they”
  • Using shortened URLs and shortDOIs if a URL or DOI is long and complex
  • Removal of publisher locations for books and book chapters
  • An in-text citation with 3 or more authors is to be shortened to include only the first authors name and “et al”
  • Website URLs no longer need to be preceded with “Retrieved from” unless there is also a retrieval date
  • A single space after any body-text punctuation rather than 2 spaces

To learn more about the new publication manual, check out the APA style blog.

Both the Walsh Library and the IHS Library also have permanent reference copies available for faculty and students to use.

Source: Elias, Daniel. “APA Style 7th Edition: What’s Changed?” MyBib, MyBib, 14 Sept. 2019.

Welcome Denise D’Agostino, new IHS Library Assistant

Denise D'Agostino

The IHS Library welcomes our newest team member, Denise D’Agostino. While she may be new to IHS, she is a veteran employee at Seton Hall, working at SHU Libraries for the past 21 years, most recently as the Periodicals Supervisor for SHU Libraries. Denise is now working Tuesdays through Thursdays from 7:30am – 3:30pm at IHSL, providing front-line services at the IT/AV Service Desk, staffing the IHSL email account, maintaining the reserves collection, and working on a range of other projects. Denise can be reached at 973-542-6969 or at denise.dagostino@shu.edu. We’re excited to have Denise join the team.

 

Get articles easier with Libkey Nomad Chrome extension!

We are excited to announce a new tool that will enhance and simplify the research experience for our IHS community: Libkey Nomad.

Libkey Nomad, a browser extension for Google Chrome, automatically links to full-text content from websites such as PubMed, Wikipedia, and Google Scholar.  To quote Third Iron, “Libkey Nomad keeps libraries at the heart of the research process by connecting researchers to library content, even when the user is not in the library.”

Installation instructions for Libkey Nomad can be found here.

If you have questions or need help with downloading the extension, contact you IHS librarian directly or via ihslibrary@shu.edu.

Libkey Nomad Chrome extension