Tag Archives: bevacizumab

MET – an ideal target for antibody drug conjugate therapy, plus nivolumab

MET is a gene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated upon binding with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, or Scatter Factor). Specifically, MET is a Continue reading

VB-111, A Novel Gene Therapeutic Agent in Cancer- Ashini R. Dias, Contributor

The formation of new blood vessels or angiogenesis is a normal process required for growth and wound healing. Unfortunately, it also plays a critically enabling role in the growth, proliferation, invasion and metastasis of cancers since tumors cannot grow beyond a certain size without a blood supply. The resulting new blood vessels feed the growing tumors with necessary oxygen and nutrients, allowing the cancer cells to invade nearby tissue, and gain access to immature blood vessels to metastasize throughout the body. Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), which is secreted by carcinoma cells, is the most important signaling molecule to stimulate and proliferate stromal cells. Myofibroblasts, transdifferentiated from stromal fibroblasts by PDGF, secretes chemokines that recruit endothelial precursor cells (EPC) in to the stroma. Myofibroblasts also secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which induces the differentiation of EPCs into endothelial cells, subsequently forming the neo-vasculature. Continue reading

Combined CA4P (Fosbretabulin) therapy in Cancer- Ashini R. Dias, Contributor

Malignant tumors cannot grow beyond a certain size without establishing blood supply to feed them with necessary nutrients and oxygen. The process of recruiting new blood vessels to the tumor is termed angiogenesis. Growth factors, mainly secreted by the tumor itself, induce angiogenesis; the most notable of these is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which helps endothelial precursor cells mature into neo-capillary forming, endothelial cells. These secrete other growth factors, like platelet derivative growth factor (PDGF), which attracts pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells that, together, create the outer layers of capillaries.   Continue reading

Combined Endoglin and VEGF Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Cancer – Subasinghe Nissanga A Dias, Contributor

Blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) is an important pathologic process in solid tumors. The liberation of vast amounts of vasoendothelial growth factor (VEGF), which attracts endothelial cells, is responsible for angiogenesis. Continue reading

Glioblastoma Update – Celldex Anti-EGFRvIII Vaccine and Improves Survival; Optune Device Reduces Risk of Death

Celldex’s vaccine against the mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII), reduced the risk of death from the disease by 47% in a 73-patient randomized Phase 2 study called ReACT. In addition, the survival rate at two years was 25% for patients given the vaccine versus none in the control group. It marks the first time an immunotherapy treatment has improved survival in a randomized trial of glioblastoma patients, researchers said. It is also among the first cancer vaccines to show a survival benefit. Continue reading

Lilly’s Ramucirumab (anti-VEGF-2 receptor MAb) does not meet overall survival endpoint in Phase III liver cancer study

Ramucirumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the VEGF2 (Vascular Endothelial Factor – 2) receptor failed to meet its Overall Survival endpoint in Phase III clinical study in patients with liver cancer… Continue reading