Monthly Archives: November 2016

Sports Poll Podcast, with Rick Gentile and Seth Everett 11.21.16

IBM Computer TechnicianClick below to hear or download a discussion on the findings of the most recent Seton Hall Sports Poll release– featuring veteran sportscaster and analyst Seth Everett with Rick Gentile, Director of the Sports Poll and 10 time Emmy Award winner for his work as Executive Producer and Senior Vice President of CBS Sports.

Streaming link : http://tobtr.com/9624753

Download : https://t.co/1Ao9Tijmcj

Nearly 20 Percent Watch Live Sports on Mobile Devices or Computers

watch-live-sports-shspSouth Orange, NJ, November 21, 2016 The Seton Hall Sports Poll looked at the viewing habits of fans – of all sports – and found that 22% said they watched less live sports on TV than in the past; 13% said they are watching more, and 60% about the same.

Of interest within those results, 17% said they sometimes watched on a computer; 19% said they sometimes watched on a mobile device (like a phone or a tablet), and 83% said they watched on a traditional television set.

These were the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted last week among 913 randomly called adult Americans, on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

As an area of growth, viewing on a mobile device has the greatest increase. Of those watching on a mobile device, 28% are watching more, 15% less, and 55% about the same. Of those watching on a computer, 25% are watching more, 23% less, and 50% about the same. Of those responding “yes” to television sets, 16% are watching more, 20% less, and 63% about the same.

“Television remains by far the biggest aggregator for sports fans,” said Gentile. “But nearly 20% of fans do some of their viewing in other ways. We will regularly be tracking these trends.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu;
Office Phone: 973-378-9845
Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results:

  1. How do you watch live sports? On television?
  2. Yes 83%
  3. No 17

 

  1. On a mobile device (tablet or phone)?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 81

 

  1. On a computer?
  2. Yes 17
  3. No 83

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 18
  3. Closely 30
  4. Not closely 35
  5. Not at all 18

 

National Anthem Protest a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans; Nearly 20% Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

Stillman/Sharkey Logo

National Anthem Protest is a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans, Cited as the Leading Cause for Viewership Falloff

*****

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

South Orange, NJ, November 21, 2016 – In a year of declining television viewership for NFL games, 23% of Americans say they are watching fewer games, and a quarter of them attribute it to the protests during the playing of the national anthem.

These were the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted last week among 913 randomly called adult Americans, on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Of those watching fewer games, the fall off was attributed to:

Protests during the national anthem   25%

Too many commercial interruptions    10%

Match-ups aren’t as good                       10%

Too many games on TV                             8%

More interest in the election                    3%

Other (or don’t know)                               44%

“The anthem protest still seems to resonate most loudly but there clearly are a number of issues negatively affecting viewership,” said Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.  “We saw last week that the best remedy is great match ups and great games”

As for San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who began the protests, 50% disapprove of his not choosing to vote in this month’s election, with only 14% approving. Among African-Americans, only 30% voiced disapproval, compared to 58% of white respondents.

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

watch-live-sports-shspThe poll also tracked viewing habits of fans – of all sports – and found that 22% watched less live sports on TV than in the past; 13% are watching more, and 60% about the same.

Specifically, 17% said they sometimes watched on a computer; 19% said they sometimes watched on a mobile device (like a phone or a tablet), and 83% said they watched on a traditional television set.

As an area of growth, viewing on a mobile device has the greatest increase. Of those watching on a mobile device, 28% are watching more, 15% less, and 55% about the same. Of those watching on a computer, 25% are watching more, 23% less, and 50% about the same. Of those responding “yes” to television sets, 16% are watching more, 20% less, and 63% about the same.

“Television remains by far the biggest aggregator for sports fans,” said Gentile. “But nearly 20% of fans do some of their viewing in other ways. We will regularly be tracking these trends.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu;
Office Phone: 973-378-9845
Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results:

 

  1. Do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?
  2. More 10
  3. Fewer 23
  4. About the same 58
  5. Don’t know 9

(IF “FEWER” ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTION. IF MORE OR SAME SKIP NEXT

QUESTION)

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

  1. Do you watch more live sports on TV than in the past, less live sports on TV or about the same amount as in the past?
  2. More 13
  3. Less                                     22
  4. About the same 60
  5. Don’t know 5

 

  1. How do you watch live sports? On television?
  2. Yes 83
  3. No 17

 

  1. On a mobile device (tablet or phone)?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 81

 

  1. On a computer?
  2. Yes 17
  3. No 83

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 18
  3. Closely 30
  4. Not closely 35
  5. Not at all 18

 

Seton Hall Sports Poll Reveals Nation Sides with Obama’s Caution on Sons Playing Football vs. Trump’s Feeling that ‘Head on Tackles are Incredible to Watch’

Fans Who Say they Watch Less Football Cite National Anthem Protest as Principal Reason

South Orange, NJ, November 17, 2016 — This week’s Seton Hall Sports Poll, asked Americans how they felt about the concussion/head injury issue in football.

People were asked if they most agreed with President Obama’s feelings about having to think twice about letting a son play football, or President-elect Trump’s statement that head-on-tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. 59% agreed with the Obama position while only 23% agreed with the Trump statement.

By gender, women agreed with Obama over Trump by 66%-17%, and men agreed with Obama by 52%-29%.

“That is a decisive margin, and belies the embrace the nation’s voters show for Trump’s generally tough stances,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

The results came from the poll conducted this week among 913 landline and cellphone adult users across the US. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Meanwhile, the poll asked respondents if they were watching less football, and if so, asked for reasons. 25% cited the protests during the national anthem, 10% said the match-ups aren’t as good, 10% cited too many commercial interruptions, 8% said “too many games on TV,” and 3% said “more interested in election.” 44% indicated either another choice (unnamed) or no opinion.

As for Colin Kaepernick, the San Francisco quarterback who triggered the national anthem protests, 50% expressed disapproval over his deciding not to vote in the presidential election, with only 14% showing approval. Only 30% of African-Americans disapproved compared to 58% of white respondents.

By a 2-1 margin (61% to 30%), respondents citied the Trump election victory as more surprising than the Chicago Cubs world championship. The Cubs, of course, had not won in 108 years – but no American president had ever gained the presidency from a business and non-political (or wartime) background.

The poll also asked who would be a better role model, 29% said college athletes, 21% said pro athletes, and 9% said politicians. It is worth noting that 42% said “none” or “don’t know” without those selections being offered by pollsters.

GOOD NEWS FOR MLB – SERIES MADE ONE IN FIVE AMERICANS

INTERESTED IN FOLLOWING BASEBALL MORE AVIDLY

There was good news for Major League Baseball amongst the findings – 19% the country said that the Cubs victory made them more interested in following baseball.

“For any sports league to have a single event that might turn that many people into more avid fans is a remarkable achievement,” said Gentile.  “At first glance, one might say, ‘well, it’s only 19%’, but in raw numbers – a fifth of the population is a tremendous number for MLB.”

Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu
Office Phone: 973-378-9845

Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results

 

  1. Whom do you think make better role models, politicians, professional athletes or collegiate athletes?
  2. Politicians 9%
  3. Pro athletes 21
  4. College athletes 29
  5. None 35
  6. Don’t know 7

 

  1. Which event would you say surprised you the most, the Chicago Cubs winning the World Series or Donald Trump winning the presidential election?
  2. Cubs 30
  3. Trump 61
  4. Neither 5
  5. Don’t know 3

 

  1. Has the Cubs’ victory in the World Series made you more interested in following baseball?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 77
  4. Don’t know 4

 

  1. President Obama has said if he had a son he would have to think twice about letting him play football because of potential head injuries. President-elect Trump has said head-on tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. Which position do you most agree with?
  2. Obama 59
  3. Trump 23
  4. Neither 10
  5. Don’t know 8

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Poll Cited by Media Across the Country

Sports PollThe Seton Hall Sports Poll was cited by media across the country, including Forbes, ESPN, USA Today, CNBC, The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, CBS, ABC, MSN, Breitbart, NY Daily News, Yahoo Sports, The Sporting News, UK’s Daily Mail, Star Ledger, Miami Herald, Arizona Republic, San Francisco Chronicle and radio stations all throughout the land. In addition, Benjamin Watson, an NFL player for the Baltimore Ravens, cited to the poll in an article he wrote on SportsBlog.

On ESPN, in addition to a print piece written by sports business analyst Darren Rovell, the Poll’s results were featured on the TV shows “First Take” and “Outside the Lines.”

Sports PollThe most recent Sports Poll asked the public questions on the declining viewership of NFL games, the potential for “rigging” various sporting events and the presidential election, and what they thought about “locker room talk.”

Media highlights include:

USA Today, Poll: About 50% of Americans Believe Sports, Presidential Election Could Be Rigged

Forbes, “Will Fans Tune Back In To The NFL After The Presidential Election?” 

CBS, “Poll: NFL Ratings Down Due To National Anthem Protests”

CNBC, “There Are a Lot of Reasons for the NFL’s Ratings Slide”

ESPN, “Anthem Protests Part of Problem with NFL Ratings”

New York Times, “TV Viewership Falls in N.F.L. and Premier League: A Blip, or Something Worse?”

The Sporting News, “Is Donald Trump Right about Colin Kaepernick and NFL TV Ratings?”

Miami Herald, “NFL’s declining TV ratings a needed slap in face for sport that has itself to blame”

Yahoo Sports, “NFL Viewership is Down, but not for Some of the Reasons you Might Think”

Breitbart, “Miami Dolphins Kneeler Doesn’t Think NFL Ratings Dip Connected to Anthem Protest”

Breitbart, “Fans Agree: NFL Ratings Fall Due to Anti-American National Anthem Protests”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Twitter Woes; Anthem Protests and Assorted Backlashes” 

Legal Sports Report, “Poll: Nearly Half of Americans Think Sporting Events can Be Rigged”

ABC, “Poll Finds Anthem Protests Hurting NFL Ratings”

NY Daily News, “NFL’s declining ratings could be due to these three factors: poll”

Sports Illustrated, “About 50% of Americans Believe Sports could Be Rigged”

The Arizona Republic, “California conservatives to observe polling stations” 

Daily Mail, “National anthem protests have caused NFL ratings to drop by 12 per cent”

SportsBlog (article from Benjamin Watson, NFL player, Baltimore Ravens), “More than just National Anthem Protests for NFL Players, Teams”

MSN, “Poll: About 50% of Americans believe sports, presidential election could be rigged”

Star Ledger, “People Think Presidential Election, Sports Games could be Rigged, Poll Finds”

NJ 101.5 “Rigged?!? About half of Americans thinks pretty much EVERYTHING might be fixed”

Director of Seton Hall’s Sport Management Program, Charles Grantham, Featured in The Undefeated

charles-granthamDrawing on his experience as the former executive director of the NBA Players Association, Associate Professor Charles Grantham was featured in The Undefeated detailing a five point plan for athletes, team owners and league officials to help effectuate social justice.

The article is entitled, “Economic and social justice: What can players and leagues really do?

Issuing what he refers to as “a challenge to the nation’s comfortable silence,” Professor Grantham writes:

As done in the past on drug addiction and HIV/AIDS, the players and owners need to engage in a “principled negotiation,” one rooted in collaboration that stresses mutual issues, rather than the positions of the parties. For example, as the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) negotiate an extension to their current collective bargaining agreement (CBA), a path forward by the players and owners could begin by agreeing to take a small amount of their shared revenue (perhaps one-half of 1 percent) to create a fund to use sports as a tool to address the inferior education of inner-city schools and the deteriorating relationship between young black men and law enforcement in all NBA cities.

As youth demonstrations continue to expand, any action plan must begin with them. The joint fund could be used to financially support basketball in the public school systems, grades 5-12 in the NBA’s 30 cities, freeing school funds to be redirected to academic programs. The action plan would require the mayor, police chief and school superintendents’ cooperation to receive the funds. It could use appearances by current and retired NBA players with law enforcement officers to create and inspire improved relationships in the communities. This can also be achieved by the NFL/NFL Players Association (NFLPA), despite their poor labor/management relationship. The leagues’ political lobby could aid the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) and the NAACP should they pursue an amendment to the Civil Rights Act, in order to allow the Justice Department prosecutorial authority in the most egregious instances of officer-involved shootings.

Read more of “Economic and social justice: What can players and leagues really do?

 

By More than 2 to 1, Americans Say that Pros and Colleges Not Doing Enough to Police Sexual Assaults

54% Believe Locker Room Talk is Similar to the Trump Tape

South Orange, NJ, November 2, 2016 — By a 58% to 24% margin, Americans believe that professional leagues and college conferences are not doing enough to police instances of sexual abuse by athletes.

This was the finding of a national poll conducted last week by the Seton Hall Sports Poll. The poll spoke to 841 adults (landlines and cellphones), and has a margin of error of +/- 3.4%.

A total of 58% said “no” on the question of doing enough to police the instances, with only 24% saying enough was being done.

68% felt that universities were commonly hiding instances of sexual abuse by athletes, with only 21% feeling they were not hiding those instances.

76% felt the NFL should have stronger penalties for players involved in domestic violence cases, with only 15% saying “no”. A third of respondents – 33% – felt that reports of sexual abuse by athletes make them less interested in following sports.

“The issue of the policing of sex abuse by athletes is not going away, and there seems to be a clear call for the organizing bodies to step up on areas of policing and punishment,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

By 72% to 16%, Americans believe that male athletes discuss their sexual conquests of women in locker room discussions. That finding was evenly placed among men (73%) and women (71%). By 54% to 33% American believe that athletes speak in the manner expressed by Donald Trump in his 2005 tape, with 58% of males thinking “yes, they do” and 51% of women thinking the same.

Rick Gentile was interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings, which can be heard at https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467?mt=2&i=377401371

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 24-26 among 841 ta adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com

Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University