Category Archives: Professional

Professor Charles Grantham in The Undefeated and Wharton Business Radio on Athlete Anthem Protests

Professor Charles Grantham, director of the Center for Sport Management, was featured in The Undefeated and on Wharton Business Radio on Sirius XM.

Grantham, who is the former Executive Director of the National Basketball Players Association, published an essay in The Undefeated entitled, “Unions had better start doing their jobs to protect NFL players’ rights.”

In the essay, Grantham writes:

Colin Kaepernick’s act of protest in the backdrop of a presidential election, and now administration, where race is front and center has created a firestorm with regard to racial attitudes and relations in America.

The protest, using sports as the platform, has opened a conversation that is long overdue in America, and each day more people are brought into the debate offering support or disagreeing with the protest. Whatever your opinion, the‎re is still an “uncomfortable silence” from the segment of the sports community that can actually effect the very change Kaepernick, NFL players and other athletes are seeking….

Any solution to this protest will require the commissioners‎ and union leaders in both sports to demonstrate the courage currently displayed by the athletes and the bold thinking required to change status quo. While management and labor are most often adversaries, they are financial partners in a defined revenue sharing/salary cap business model because of the collective bargaining agreement. Thus, the biggest challenge to leadership on both sides of the aisle is to determine when and how outside forces affect revenue and franchise values.

Read more of “Unions had better start doing their jobs to protect NFL players’ rights.”

On the Sirius XM Wharton School of Business radio show, “Knowledge@Wharton,” host Dan Loney led a roundtable discussion on the anthem protests as well as the rights and relative business interests of both players and owners. Along with Professor Grantham, the show featured Wharton Professor Emeritus and CEO of Global Sports Institute, Ken Shropshire; and Andrew Brandt, director of the Center for Sports Law at Villanova and NFL business analyst for ESPN.

You can hear the show in its entirety here.

Americans Throw Penalty Flags at Both Goodell and Trump for their Positions on the NFL Stand/Kneel Issue

Americans Throw Penalty Flags at Both Goodell and Trump for their Positions on the NFL Stand/Kneel Issue; 82% Say ‘Advise Parents on Risk of Youth Football’

South Orange, NJ, October 27, 2017 — By a 47% to 42% margin, Americans believe that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell should have ordered the league’s players to stand during the national anthem.

By a wider margin – 55% v. 37% – people said it was inappropriate for President Trump to request that people sign a petition saying that the players stand.

These were among the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted this week across the nation among 715 adults, on landlines and cellphones.  The poll has a margin of error of 3.7%.

“The president’s base, which polls consistently show to be in the 35% area, seems to support him at every turn without wavering, and that extends to his war of words with the NFL,” said Rick Gentle, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute as part of the university’s Stillman School of Business.  “The 37% support on this question is consistent with that.”

“But clearly,” added Gentile, “Goodell’s position lacks strong public support.  “This is a tough issue for people who love football, love the flag, and still respect freedom of expression.”

MATTERS OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IN YOUTH FOOTBALL ADDRESSED

The Poll also asked a number of questions related to the safety of youth football.  Asked if football organizing groups should have medical personnel advise parents about the dangers of playing organized football before their child signs up to play, a huge 82% said yes, with only 11% saying no.

Asked if they thought youth football leagues through high school are taking adequate steps to improve the safety of the game, 49% said yes, and only 22% said no.

Respondents were also asked at what age he or she would allow a child to play football, 39% said ages 7-11, 27% said ages 12-15, and only 9% said age 16 and over.  20% responded “never.”

“It is significant that one in five – 20% – say ‘never’ for the sport considered the most popular one in America,” noted Gentile.

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic (and yesterday’s release on baseball questions) with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at https://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 23-25 among 715 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

  1. After a meeting with players and owners last week, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced he will not order the players to stand for the pre-game playing of the national anthem. Do you agree with his position or disagree?
    1. Agree 42%
    2. Disagree 47
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 11

 

  1. President Trump has asked people to sign a petition saying that they support standing for the national anthem in response to the NFL not insisting its players do so. Do you think it’s appropriate for the president to make such a request?
    1. Yes 37
    2. No 55
    3. Don’t know   8

 

 

 

  1. If you were to allow your child to play football, at what age would you allow him to play, 7-11, 12-15, 16 or older or never?
    1. 7-11 39
    2. 12-15 27
    3. 16+   9
    4. Never 20
    5. Don’t know/No opinion   6

 

  1. Do you think youth football leagues through high school are taking adequate steps to improve the safety of the game?
    1. Yes 49
    2. No 22
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 29

 

  1. Do you think football organizing groups should have medical personnel advise parents about the dangers of playing organized football before their child signs up to play?
    1. Yes 82
    2. No 11
    3. Don’t know/No opinion   7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balls and Strikes Via Computer? Baseball Fans Shout ‘Keep the Umpire’

75% say they prefer an umpire to a computer making balls and strikes call; one third think undetected drugs are driving all those homers

South Orange, NJ, October 26, 2017 — In a week in which a record number of home runs were hit in a single World Series game…..and post-season coverage provides continuous use of the strike zone boundaries for each pitch….fans are clear that they want umpires – and not a computer – calling balls and strikes…..but also suspicious of the use of performing enhancing drugs driving all those homers.

These were among the findings in the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted this week across the nation among 715 adults, on landlines and cellphones.  The baseball data is based on the 62% of respondents that follow baseball and has a margin of error of 4.8%.

Perhaps driven by the umpire calls when the strike zone box is up, (or perhaps just by being traditionalists), a strong 75% preferred that the umpire make the ball-strike calls, with only 11% opting for computer calls.  (14% had no opinion).

“Either fans are leaning toward the more traditional way of doing things or they simply don’t want to give up their God-given right to bash the umpire for missing ball and strike calls,” said Rick Gentle, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute as part of the university’s Stillman School of Business.”

On the matter of home runs, of which a record number were hit this season in the Major Leagues, respondents were asked to say “yes” or “no” to a variety of factors.

Reasons for Record Number of Home Runs:

 

Yes      No

A more lively ball                               29        40

Undetected use of PEDs                   31        46

Improved batting techniques          62        20

Hitters more focused on HRs           55        24

Bad pitching                                        28        48

“While performance enhancing drugs are not among the top reasons, the fact that nearly 1 in 3 fans think it’s still part of the game should be alarming to the Commissioner’s Office,” noted  Gentile.

“Obviously the balls are juiced,” Houston pitcher Dallas Keuchel told USA Today, today.  “I think they’re juiced 100%.”

On pace-of-play, another much discussed issue among baseball people, fans were pretty evenly divided, favoring by 43%-40% a rule restricting in-inning mound meetings….but stayed traditional on limiting in-inning pitching changes, voting “no” by 57%-26%.

“The latter would be a major rule change which would need approval of the player’s union as well as the Commissioner’s Office, and clearly among fans, there is no desire to go there,” said Gentile.

The Poll also asked,  “how often would you say you watch an entire live post-season baseball game,” with 45% saying “occasionally,” 26% saying “often” and 17% saying “never”.

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile will be posted later today.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 23-25 among 715 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

 

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow baseball, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
    1. Very closely 11
    2. Closely 23
    3. Not closely 30
    4. Not at all 37

 

(IF “NOT AT ALL” SKIP TO DEMOGRAPHICS)

  1. This season, more home runs were hit in the major leagues than ever in history. Please tell me which of the following reasons you think could be responsible, a more lively ball?
    1. Yes 29
    2. No 40
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 32

 

  1. Undetected use of performance enhancing drugs by players
    1. Yes 31
    2. No 46
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 23

 

  1. Improved batting techniques
    1. Yes 62
    2. No 20
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 19

 

  1. Hitters more focused on home run hitting
    1. Yes 55
    2. No 24
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 22
  2. Bad pitching
  3. Yes 28
  4. No 48
  5. Don’t know/No opinion 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How often would you say you watch an entire live post-season baseball game, often, occasionally or never?
    1. Often 26
    2. Occasionally 45
    3. Never 17
    4. Don’t know/No opinion 12

 

 

 

  1. Would you be in favor of a rule restricting the number of in-inning mound meetings in an attempt to speed up the game?
    1. Yes 43
    2. No 40
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 17

 

  1. Would you be in favor of a rule restricting the number in-inning pitching changes in an attempt to speed up the game?
    1. Yes 26
    2. No 57
    3. Don’t know 17

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Would you like to see balls and strikes called by a computer rather than an umpire behind home plate?
    1. Computer 11
    2. Umpire 75
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 14

 

 

Seton Hall Law Professor Charles Sullivan in ESPN Article on Legal Ramifications of Benching NFL Anthem Protesters

Seton Hall Law Professor and Associate Dean, Charles Sullivan, was featured in an ESPN article regarding the legal ramifications, if any, for NFL teams that bench players for participating in protests during the national anthem before games.

Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys, has indicated that he would “bench” players that do not stand for the national anthem.

Sullivan, a noted expert in employment law who has published three of the leading legal casebooks on the subject, appeared in an article entitled, “Is it legal for Jerry Jones to bench players who do not stand?”

Debate surrounding the protests has been heated and, according to our most recent Sports Poll, has resulted in a decline in NFL viewership.

As this graphic from Fox News shows, of those who are watching fewer games, more than half attribute the decrease to the anthem protests (47% in disapproval, 6% as a show of solidarity with the players).

And the number who said they are watching less NFL games is substantial. The New York Post, citing our poll headlined it succinctly: “30 Percent are Watching Less — and Most Blame Anthem.”

Although football is a game, the NFL is a multi-billion dollar business, the players employees and the owners employers.

Given that the NFL relies heavily upon its TV contracts and those contracts are based upon the advertising revenue that mass viewership brings, it is not surprising that a decline in viewership based primarily upon one issue has that issue becoming a paramount concern for NFL owners.

As the ESPN article notes, beyond the presidential twitterstorm, social media campaigns and various boycotts both for and against the anthem protests:

According to a half-dozen experts we contacted, workplace employment law may have the last word. While the experts are divided on who would win such a legal battle, our sample ruled narrowly in favor of the owners.

Charles Sullivan, professor of law, Seton Hall University: “Where I think the players have a problem is there’s not really an adverse employment action if they are simply benched. They are still being paid, and I don’t think they necessarily have the right to play in games.”
Advantage: Owners

You can read the full article here, “Is it legal for Jerry Jones to bench players who do not stand?

You can read more about the most recent Sports Poll and its media coverage here: http://www.shu.edu/business/news/seton-hall-sports-poll-featured-in-media-nationwide.cfm

 

Poll Finds Americans Favor Protective Foul Line Netting in Baseball Stadiums, Except for the Young

South Orange, NJ, October 5, 2017 — A poll conducted by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that by an overall margin of 49% to 31, Americans believe that baseball stadiums should extend netting down the foul lines to protect fans from foul balls and wayward bats. The remaining 20% either did not know or had no opinion.

When broken down according to age, however, a different view appears: 18-29 year old respondents reached the opposite conclusion, opposing the extension of protective netting by a 39% to 33% margin.

In fact, the number in favor of protective netting along foul lines in baseball stadiums rose in correlation to age group.

Ages 18 – 29, 39% opposed installation of protective netting while 33% were in favor

Ages 30 – 49, 49% favored installation of protective netting while 36% opposed

Ages 45 – 59, 52% favored installation of protective netting while 30% opposed

Ages 60+, 56% favored installation of protective netting while 23% opposed

“Clearly the concerns about safety grow as our respondents get older. It’s rare that such a direct correlation occurs from age group to age group,” noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute as part of the University’s Stillman School of Business.

The New York Yankees recently announced that they would “significantly expand” the protective netting at Yankee Stadium after a toddler was seriously injured when struck in the face by a foul ball.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday last week.  It has a margin of error of 3.4%.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

Seton Hall Poll Takes ‘Kneeling’ Question to Just NFL Fans, vs. Last Week’s ‘All Americans’

South Orange, NJ, October 5, 2017 — Statisticians at the Seton Hall Sports Poll dug a little deeper this week, looking at figures reflecting the opinions of people who identified themselves as “fans of the NFL,” and separating their responses to the overall responses published last week.

The excision of those results showed that nearly a third – 30% – said they were watching fewer games this season (9% were watching more, 55% about the same), and that 52% of those watching less gave the reason as players protesting the national anthem.

The poll was conducted last week and results covering all Americans were released on September 28.  (http://blogs.shu.edu/sportspoll/2017/09/28/84-support-nfl-players-right-to-protest-but-vary-on-how-to-carry-that-out-only-16-say-protesters-should-be-dropped/).  The poll numbers for those who said they were NFL fans were not dramatically different from the overall numbers, but still of interest.

As to whether NFL fans agreed or disagreed with the act of protest during the national anthem, 38% agreed with the gesture, (vs. 33% of “all” responders last week), and 45% disagreed with it (vs. 44% of “all responders.”).

On President Trump’s call for those who kneel to be fired, 28% of NFL fans agree with the President, (exactly even with the result from all Americans), while 55% agree with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell that the President’s statement were divisive, which was up from the 50% when all Americans were asked.

91% OF NFL FANS STILL PREFER GAMES ON TRADITIONAL TV

(This was not part of last week’s release).

The poll also revealed that despite talks of “cord-cutting” and efforts to introduce other devices for fans to follow games, 91% of NFL fans still watch the games on traditional television, with only 4% saying “on computer” and just 1% citing a mobile device.   

“If this is the emerging technology for watching live football, it clearly has a long way to go,” noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday of last week.  It has a margin of error of 3.4%.   411 of the respondents made up the “fans of the NFL” sample.

ONLY 18% OF AMERICANS SAY THAT ESPN’S JEMELE HILL SHOULD BE FIRED FOR ‘WHITE SUPREMACIST’ TWEET

(This was not part of last week’s release).

Only 18% of Americans believe that ESPN broadcaster Jemele Hill should be fired because of statements she posted on her personal Twitter account, which a White House spokesperson called a “fireable offense.”  She had called President Trump a “white supremacist.”   

38% believed that reporters working for media companies should be prohibited from using personal social media accounts to make controversial social or political statements.

68% said Ms. Hill should not be fired; 18% said she should. There was a sharp divide among African-American responders and whites; 84% of African-Americans felt she should not be fired and only 5% said she should.  Among whites, it was 65% for not firing her, and 22% for firing her.

“Firing her was obviously considered too severe,” noted Gentile.  “But her Tweet seems to have opened a dialogue about limits.  That could be a healthy thing.”

A podcast by Seth Everett interviewing Rick Gentile, can be found at
https://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall University Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu 908-447-3034

The results:

The Poll revisited last week’s results by separating out the responses from people who identified themselves as NFL fans.  The second column shows those results (the first column repeats the results by all respondents:

  1. This season, do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?

More   5%       9

Fewer 29        30

About the same 50        55

Don’t know 16          6

(IF “FEWER” ASK QUESTION 2.  IF “MORE”, “SAME”, OR “DON’T KNOW” SKIP

QUESTION 2)

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following:The games aren’t as good as in past years   3
    Too many games on TV   2          3

Too many commercial interruptions   4          4

The players’ protests during the national anthem 47        52

Boycotting in support of player protests   6          6

Bothered by danger of head injuries   1          1

Other 21        23

Don’t know 15          7

 

3.Do you generally watch live NFL games on TV, a mobile device or on a computer?

TV 70        91

Mobile device   1          1

Computer   3          4

Don’t watch at all 19          4

Don’t know   7          1

4. Colin Kaepernick waged a protest last season by kneeling during the national anthem. This year other players have continued the protest by not standing during the playing of the anthem. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about the gesture?

Approve 32        38

Disapprove 44        45

No opinion 22        17

Don’t know   3          1

 

5. Which of the following statements do you agree with most:

I don’t support the players’ right to protest and believe they should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse 16       15

I support the players’ right to protest but believe they should stand for the anthem, finding a different way to express their political opinions 49     49

I support the players’ right to protest and I think not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest                       35          36

6. Colin Kaepernick has not been signed by an NFL team and some say it is because of last year’s protest. Do you think he would be signed today if he had not protested or has he not been signed because he’s not a good enough player?

Protested 47        57

Not good enough 19        23

Don’t know/No opinion 34        20

 

7. President Trump has called on NFL owners to fire any player who refuses to stand for the national anthem. Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners have responded that the president’s comments were divisive. Whom do you most agree with?

President Trump 28        28

Commissioner Goodell and the owners 50        55

Neither                                                                                     7          7

Both   2          1

Don’t know/No opinion 13          9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

84% Support NFL Players’ Right to Protest, But Vary on How to Carry that Out; Only 16% Say Protesters Should Be Dropped from Teams

84% Support NFL Players’ Right to Protest, But Vary on How to Carry that Out;
Only 16% Say Protesters Should Be Dropped
from Team. Wide Discrepancy Between African-Americans and Whites

South Orange, NJ, September 28, 2017 — A poll conducted this week by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that 84% of American support the NFL players’ right to protest,    with only 16% saying the players should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse.

Of the 84% supporting the players’ right to protest, 49% felt they should find a different way to express their political opinions, and 35% felt that not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest.  There was a wide racial gap in those saying it was an acceptable form of protest.with  70% of African-American choosing that option  only 28% of whites doing so.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday of this week.  It has a margin of error of 3.4%.

An identical question was asked a year ago about just Kaepernick.  At that time, 80% supported the right to protest and 20% believed they should be dropped from the team if they refused an order to stand.

Asked specifically this week about players not standing during the playing of the anthem, 44% of all respondents disapproved, 32% approved, and 25% had no opinion or did not know.  The responses to the same question about just Kaepernick a year ago were 47% disapproval and 27% approval.

“These attitudes are remarkably stable given all that has happened in this past year and the recent spike in attention being paid to the subject. , noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute.

Respondents were asked whether they agreed more with President Trump who called on NFL owners to fire any players who refuse to stand or with Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners who called the president’s comments divisive

Trump received the support of 28% and Goodell received  50%.  Among African-Americans Trump received 6% vs 78% for Goodell, and whites were 32% to 47%.

Asked about Kaepernick’s lack of a contract by an NFL team, 47% felt it was because of his protests and 19% because he wasn’t good enough.  81% of African-Americans felt it was because of his protest with only 7% saying it was because he was not good enough, while among whites the ratio was 41% (protest) and 22% (ability).

“This is an emotional issue for many people with obvious differences between whites and African-Americans,” said Gentile.  “The overall support for the players’ right to protest – in some form – is heartening especially considering some of the divisive rhetoric we’ve heard revolving around this issue.”

The protests can be very damaging to the NFL’s popularity.  29% of respondents said they were watching fewer games this season, and of that group, 47% cited the player protests during the national anthem.

In an identical question asked in November 2016, 25% said they were watching fewer games because of the anthem protest.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

  1. This season, do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?
  2. More   5%
  3. Fewer 29
  4. About the same 50
  5. Don’t know 16

(IF “FEWER” ASK QUESTION 2.  IF “MORE”, “SAME”, OR “DON’T KNOW” SKIP

QUESTION 2

Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following:

  1. The games aren’t as good as in past years   3
  2. Too many games on TV   2
  3. Too many commercial interruptions   4
  4. The players’ protests during the national anthem 47
  5. Boycotting in support of player protests   6
  6. Bothered by danger of head injuries   1
  7. Other 21
  8. Don’t know 15

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick waged a protest last season by kneeling during the national anthem. This year other players have continued the protest by not standing during the playing of the anthem. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about the gesture?
    1. Approve 32
    2. Disapprove 44
    3. No opinion 22
    4. Don’t know   3

 

  1. Which of the following statements do you agree with most:
  2. I don’t support the players’ right to protest and believe they should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse 16
  3. I support the players’ right to protest but believe they should stand for the anthem, finding a different way to express their political opinions 49
  4. I support the players’ right to protest and I think not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest                       35

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick has not been signed by an NFL team and some say it is because of last year’s protest. Do you think he would be signed today if he had not protested or has he not been signed because he’s not a good enough player?
    1. Protested 47
    2. Not good enough 19
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 34

 

  1. President Trump has called on NFL owners to fire any player who refuses to stand for the national anthem. Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners have responded that the president’s comments were divisive. Whom do you most agree with?
    1. President Trump 28
    2. Commissioner Goodell and the owners 50
    3. Neither (DON’T READ)   7
    4. Both (DON’T READ)   2
    5. Don’t know/No opinion 13
  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
    1. Very closely 24
    2. Closely 33
    3. Not closely 30
    4. Not at all 13

(IF “VERY CLOSELY”, “CLOSELY”, OR “NOT CLOSELY” ASK QUESTION .  IF “NOT AT ALL” SKIP QUESTION )

8. How closely would you say you follow the NFL, very closely, closely, not closely, or not at all?

  1. Very closely 20
  2. Closely 31
  3. Not closely 28
  4. Not at all 22

 

 

 

Cord Cutting Can Wait – 98 Percent Watched Super Bowl on TV; Public Says Brady ‘Best Ever’

South Orange, NJ, February 9, 2017 – An era of cord-cutting may loom in the future, but for now, traditional television viewing of the Super Bowl has a firm grasp on the American public. According to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week in the days after the game, a whopping 98% watched on TV, with only a combined 1% – barely – watching on phone, tablet or computer.

The poll was conducted February 6-8 among 661 adults across the country on both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of 3.9 %.

“It’s the biggest event of the year in America, and people want to watch it on their biggest and most reliable device,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

Meanwhile, asked if Tom Brady is the greatest quarterback in NFL history, 63% of those who identified as sports fans agreed with only 19% disagreeing. Of those who said they were NFL fans, 51% agreed, and 21% disagreed. Among the general population, 39% agreed, with only 21% disagreeing.

“These are remarkably high numbers, given the controversies surrounding him – a large dislike for the New England Patriots, his suspension over ‘deflategate’ and his support of a controversial President,” said Gentile.

In the excitement following the first overtime in Super Bowl history and the fifth Super Bowl win for the Patriots, 44% found the game the most compelling of recent championships, with Game 7 of the World Series registering 26% and the college football championship (Alabama-Clemson) at 11%.

“For the World Series to be named by one out of four Americans, three months after it ended and in the days after a thrilling Super Bowl is great news for baseball,” added Gentile.

Asked if they saw any commercials during the game that made them want to purchase the advertised product, 83% said no, and 12% yes.

“People generally don’t acknowledge that commercials influence their buying,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.  “Of course, their purchasing habits show the opposite – advertising drives sales. And 12% of the viewing public is a very large number. Advertisers should be pleased.”

7% said they enjoyed the commercials the most, but 13% named the halftime show and 72% said “the game” when asked what they enjoyed the most.

A commercial for GNC, the vitamin chain which sells substances banned by the NFL, was not shown. Asked whether GNC should have been allowed to advertise in the game, given that the banned products were not mentioned, 50% said yes they should have been allowed, with 23% saying no.

10% acknowledged wagering on the game (either through a bet, a pool or a fantasy league) and 84% said they had no wager on the game. 15% said they would have bet if wagering was legal.

A podcast in which Seth Everett interview Rick Gentile can be heard at https://t.co/bqIjtpjD64

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone February 6-8 among 661 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University,
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

 

The results:

  1. Did you watch the Super Bowl game on Sunday?
  2. Yes 72%
  3. No 28

(IF NO SKIP TO QUESTION 6)

 

  1. Where did you watch the game? (Don’t read options)
  2. At home 75
  3. At a friend’s house 17
  4. In a bar or restaurant 5
  5. Somewhere else  3

 

  1. What was the primary device you used to watch the game, a TV, phone, tablet or computer?
  2. TV 98
  3. Phone 0
  4. Tablet 0
  5. Computer 1
  6. Other 1

 

  1. Which did you enjoy more, the game, the halftime or the commercials?
  2. Game 72
  3. Halftime 13
  4. Commercials 7
  5. Don’t Know 7

 

  1. Did you see any commercials during the broadcast that made you want to purchase the product advertised?
  2. Yes 12
  3. No 83
  4. Don’t know 5

 

  1. Did you place a bet on the outcome of the game, participate in a pool, engage in fantasy play or not wager any money on the game?
  2. Bet  5
  3. Pool 4
  4. Fantasy 1
  5. No Wager 84
  6. Don’t Know/No Ans. 7

 

  1. If sports gambling was legal in your state would you have placed a bet on the game?
  2. Yes 15
  3. No 79
  4. Don’t know 6

 

  1. Tom Brady is being called the greatest quarterback in NFL history after winning his 5th Super

Bowl. Do you agree, disagree or are you not sure?

  1. Agree 39
  2. Disagree 21
  3. Not Sure 35
  4. Don’t Know 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. GNC, a maker of dietary supplements, was forced by the NFL to withdraw its commercial from the Super Bowl because it makes some products that NFL players are banned from taking. No mention of the banned products occurred in the commercial. Do you think GNC should have been allowed to advertise in the game given that the banned products were not mentioned?
  2. Yes 50
  3. No 23
  4. Don’t know 27

 

  1. Which event did you think was more compelling, the Super Bowl, the college football championship or the 7th game of the World Series?
  2. Super Bowl 44
  3. College championships 11
  4. World Series 26
  5. Don’t Know 19

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 19
  3. Closely 33
  4. Not closely 33
  5. Not at all 16

 

  1. Do you consider yourself a fan of NFL football?
  2. Yes 56
  3. No 40
  4. Don’t know 5

 

 

Sports Poll Podcast, with Rick Gentile and Seth Everett 11.21.16

IBM Computer TechnicianClick below to hear or download a discussion on the findings of the most recent Seton Hall Sports Poll release– featuring veteran sportscaster and analyst Seth Everett with Rick Gentile, Director of the Sports Poll and 10 time Emmy Award winner for his work as Executive Producer and Senior Vice President of CBS Sports.

Streaming link : http://tobtr.com/9624753

Download : https://t.co/1Ao9Tijmcj

National Anthem Protest a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans; Nearly 20% Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

Stillman/Sharkey Logo

National Anthem Protest is a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans, Cited as the Leading Cause for Viewership Falloff

*****

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

South Orange, NJ, November 21, 2016 – In a year of declining television viewership for NFL games, 23% of Americans say they are watching fewer games, and a quarter of them attribute it to the protests during the playing of the national anthem.

These were the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted last week among 913 randomly called adult Americans, on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Of those watching fewer games, the fall off was attributed to:

Protests during the national anthem   25%

Too many commercial interruptions    10%

Match-ups aren’t as good                       10%

Too many games on TV                             8%

More interest in the election                    3%

Other (or don’t know)                               44%

“The anthem protest still seems to resonate most loudly but there clearly are a number of issues negatively affecting viewership,” said Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.  “We saw last week that the best remedy is great match ups and great games”

As for San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who began the protests, 50% disapprove of his not choosing to vote in this month’s election, with only 14% approving. Among African-Americans, only 30% voiced disapproval, compared to 58% of white respondents.

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

watch-live-sports-shspThe poll also tracked viewing habits of fans – of all sports – and found that 22% watched less live sports on TV than in the past; 13% are watching more, and 60% about the same.

Specifically, 17% said they sometimes watched on a computer; 19% said they sometimes watched on a mobile device (like a phone or a tablet), and 83% said they watched on a traditional television set.

As an area of growth, viewing on a mobile device has the greatest increase. Of those watching on a mobile device, 28% are watching more, 15% less, and 55% about the same. Of those watching on a computer, 25% are watching more, 23% less, and 50% about the same. Of those responding “yes” to television sets, 16% are watching more, 20% less, and 63% about the same.

“Television remains by far the biggest aggregator for sports fans,” said Gentile. “But nearly 20% of fans do some of their viewing in other ways. We will regularly be tracking these trends.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu;
Office Phone: 973-378-9845
Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results:

 

  1. Do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?
  2. More 10
  3. Fewer 23
  4. About the same 58
  5. Don’t know 9

(IF “FEWER” ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTION. IF MORE OR SAME SKIP NEXT

QUESTION)

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

  1. Do you watch more live sports on TV than in the past, less live sports on TV or about the same amount as in the past?
  2. More 13
  3. Less                                     22
  4. About the same 60
  5. Don’t know 5

 

  1. How do you watch live sports? On television?
  2. Yes 83
  3. No 17

 

  1. On a mobile device (tablet or phone)?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 81

 

  1. On a computer?
  2. Yes 17
  3. No 83

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 18
  3. Closely 30
  4. Not closely 35
  5. Not at all 18

 

Seton Hall Sports Poll Reveals Nation Sides with Obama’s Caution on Sons Playing Football vs. Trump’s Feeling that ‘Head on Tackles are Incredible to Watch’

Fans Who Say they Watch Less Football Cite National Anthem Protest as Principal Reason

South Orange, NJ, November 17, 2016 — This week’s Seton Hall Sports Poll, asked Americans how they felt about the concussion/head injury issue in football.

People were asked if they most agreed with President Obama’s feelings about having to think twice about letting a son play football, or President-elect Trump’s statement that head-on-tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. 59% agreed with the Obama position while only 23% agreed with the Trump statement.

By gender, women agreed with Obama over Trump by 66%-17%, and men agreed with Obama by 52%-29%.

“That is a decisive margin, and belies the embrace the nation’s voters show for Trump’s generally tough stances,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

The results came from the poll conducted this week among 913 landline and cellphone adult users across the US. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Meanwhile, the poll asked respondents if they were watching less football, and if so, asked for reasons. 25% cited the protests during the national anthem, 10% said the match-ups aren’t as good, 10% cited too many commercial interruptions, 8% said “too many games on TV,” and 3% said “more interested in election.” 44% indicated either another choice (unnamed) or no opinion.

As for Colin Kaepernick, the San Francisco quarterback who triggered the national anthem protests, 50% expressed disapproval over his deciding not to vote in the presidential election, with only 14% showing approval. Only 30% of African-Americans disapproved compared to 58% of white respondents.

By a 2-1 margin (61% to 30%), respondents citied the Trump election victory as more surprising than the Chicago Cubs world championship. The Cubs, of course, had not won in 108 years – but no American president had ever gained the presidency from a business and non-political (or wartime) background.

The poll also asked who would be a better role model, 29% said college athletes, 21% said pro athletes, and 9% said politicians. It is worth noting that 42% said “none” or “don’t know” without those selections being offered by pollsters.

GOOD NEWS FOR MLB – SERIES MADE ONE IN FIVE AMERICANS

INTERESTED IN FOLLOWING BASEBALL MORE AVIDLY

There was good news for Major League Baseball amongst the findings – 19% the country said that the Cubs victory made them more interested in following baseball.

“For any sports league to have a single event that might turn that many people into more avid fans is a remarkable achievement,” said Gentile.  “At first glance, one might say, ‘well, it’s only 19%’, but in raw numbers – a fifth of the population is a tremendous number for MLB.”

Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu
Office Phone: 973-378-9845

Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results

 

  1. Whom do you think make better role models, politicians, professional athletes or collegiate athletes?
  2. Politicians 9%
  3. Pro athletes 21
  4. College athletes 29
  5. None 35
  6. Don’t know 7

 

  1. Which event would you say surprised you the most, the Chicago Cubs winning the World Series or Donald Trump winning the presidential election?
  2. Cubs 30
  3. Trump 61
  4. Neither 5
  5. Don’t know 3

 

  1. Has the Cubs’ victory in the World Series made you more interested in following baseball?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 77
  4. Don’t know 4

 

  1. President Obama has said if he had a son he would have to think twice about letting him play football because of potential head injuries. President-elect Trump has said head-on tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. Which position do you most agree with?
  2. Obama 59
  3. Trump 23
  4. Neither 10
  5. Don’t know 8

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Poll Cited by Media Across the Country

Sports PollThe Seton Hall Sports Poll was cited by media across the country, including Forbes, ESPN, USA Today, CNBC, The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, CBS, ABC, MSN, Breitbart, NY Daily News, Yahoo Sports, The Sporting News, UK’s Daily Mail, Star Ledger, Miami Herald, Arizona Republic, San Francisco Chronicle and radio stations all throughout the land. In addition, Benjamin Watson, an NFL player for the Baltimore Ravens, cited to the poll in an article he wrote on SportsBlog.

On ESPN, in addition to a print piece written by sports business analyst Darren Rovell, the Poll’s results were featured on the TV shows “First Take” and “Outside the Lines.”

Sports PollThe most recent Sports Poll asked the public questions on the declining viewership of NFL games, the potential for “rigging” various sporting events and the presidential election, and what they thought about “locker room talk.”

Media highlights include:

USA Today, Poll: About 50% of Americans Believe Sports, Presidential Election Could Be Rigged

Forbes, “Will Fans Tune Back In To The NFL After The Presidential Election?” 

CBS, “Poll: NFL Ratings Down Due To National Anthem Protests”

CNBC, “There Are a Lot of Reasons for the NFL’s Ratings Slide”

ESPN, “Anthem Protests Part of Problem with NFL Ratings”

New York Times, “TV Viewership Falls in N.F.L. and Premier League: A Blip, or Something Worse?”

The Sporting News, “Is Donald Trump Right about Colin Kaepernick and NFL TV Ratings?”

Miami Herald, “NFL’s declining TV ratings a needed slap in face for sport that has itself to blame”

Yahoo Sports, “NFL Viewership is Down, but not for Some of the Reasons you Might Think”

Breitbart, “Miami Dolphins Kneeler Doesn’t Think NFL Ratings Dip Connected to Anthem Protest”

Breitbart, “Fans Agree: NFL Ratings Fall Due to Anti-American National Anthem Protests”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Twitter Woes; Anthem Protests and Assorted Backlashes” 

Legal Sports Report, “Poll: Nearly Half of Americans Think Sporting Events can Be Rigged”

ABC, “Poll Finds Anthem Protests Hurting NFL Ratings”

NY Daily News, “NFL’s declining ratings could be due to these three factors: poll”

Sports Illustrated, “About 50% of Americans Believe Sports could Be Rigged”

The Arizona Republic, “California conservatives to observe polling stations” 

Daily Mail, “National anthem protests have caused NFL ratings to drop by 12 per cent”

SportsBlog (article from Benjamin Watson, NFL player, Baltimore Ravens), “More than just National Anthem Protests for NFL Players, Teams”

MSN, “Poll: About 50% of Americans believe sports, presidential election could be rigged”

Star Ledger, “People Think Presidential Election, Sports Games could be Rigged, Poll Finds”

NJ 101.5 “Rigged?!? About half of Americans thinks pretty much EVERYTHING might be fixed”

NFL TV Ratings Down; Fans Cite a Host of Factors, Led by National Anthem Protests

Seven Possible Reasons for Flagging NFL Ratings Resonate with the Public

South Orange, NJ, October 27, 2016 — Viewership for NFL games is down approximately 12% this season, sending league and club officials in search of reasons. A Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week asked people to identify factors accounting for the drop.

Each question was asked separately, allowing for a yes, no or don’t know response.   Thus, respondents could weigh in on each of the seven possibilities as a contributing factor without identifying one single factor.

The leading factor – the one receiving the most “yesses” – was players not standing for the national anthem. However, the seven factors all evoked a large number of yes responses, so that even the least chosen, at 33%, represents a lot of fans.

56% of respondents cited players not standing for the anthem, with 50% citing the distraction of the presidential campaign and 47% the controversy over the handling of domestic violence cases involving players.

On the question of domestic violence, men and women responded equally; 47% of men cited that as a possible reason, 46% of women said yes to that possibility.

Other factors included games on too many days, over-saturating the market (44%), increased interest in post-season baseball (39%), the ongoing controversy over head injuries (33%) and a decline in quality of play on the field (33%).

A total of 841 adults across the US (on landlines and cellphones) participated in the poll, which has a margin of error of +/- 3.4%. The poll was conducted October 24-26.

“Only a third cited quality of play and head injuries,” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “Perhaps the league can take some solace in that, although a third is still a lot of people. But it is somewhat remarkable that the impact of the national anthem protest seems to hold, given that the action occurs pre-game and isn’t even televised.”

Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

 

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 24-26 among 841 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com
or Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University,
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

Lebron Is Still King When Endorsement Matters, According to Seton Hall Sports Poll

Stillman/Sharkey LogoLEBRON IS STILL KING WHEN ENDORSEMENT MATTERS, ACCORDING TO SETON HALL SPORTS POLL

James Has Edge Over Curry Among Consumers

Retired Manning, Somewhat Deflated Brady Top Football Endorsers

South Orange, NJ, September 27, 2016 — LeBron James is more likely than Steph Curry to influence a purchasing decision by American consumers according to a national poll conducted last week by the Seton Hall Sports Poll.

The poll was conducted this week among 875 adults on both landlines and cellphones across the nation. (There is a margin of error of +/- 3.4%).

When asked which player is more likely “to sway your purchase decision on something he endorses”, 26% selected James and 19% selected Curry, with 40% choosing neither, and 16% declaring “don’t know.”

“Curry got enormous attention last year, but James did win the championship, and he’s been on the scene a lot longer” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “We will be watching to see if this turns over the next season.”

When confronted with marquee names from the NFL, and asked if their endorsement would sway a purchase decision, the retired Peyton Manning scored highest among those listed, with 31% saying “yes” to his name. Tom Brady, currently serving a four-game suspension for “Deflategate,” ranked second with 21%. Others listed were Aaron Rodgers (17%), Cam Newton (16%), JJ Watt (15%) and Odell Beckham Jr. (13%).

Manning was the only player where women rated him as high as men; they were much less impressed by the others. Manning in fact had 32% “yes” among women, 31% among men. Brady was 19% yes among women, 23% among men. Rogers received only 9% “yes” from women, 25% “yes” from men.

Advertisers will likely note that younger people are more likely to be swayed by an endorsement. It was most apparent among those giving the answer “neither,” with 26% of 18-29 years old saying “neither” while 40% of those 30-44, 43% of those 45-60 and 46% of those over 60 did.

Rick Gentile was interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467?mt=2#episodeGuid=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blogtalkradio.com%2Fsetonhallsportspoll%2F2016%2F09%2F23%2Fseason-2-september-2016-colin-kaepernick-national-anthem-controvery

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 19-21 among 875 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations (212) 245-1772, AppelPR@gmail.com; Rick Gentile (917) 881-9489.

The results:

1. Which basketball player is more likely to sway your purchase decision on something he endorses, Steph Curry or LeBron James?

Curry 19
James 26
Neither 40
Don’t know 16

2. I am going to read you the names of some current and former NFL players. Tell me if their endorsement would sway your purchase decision:

Cam Newton
Yes 16
No 64
Don’t know 20

Peyton Manning
Yes 31
No 56
Don’t know 13

Tom Brady
Yes 21
No 65
Don’t know 15

Aaron Rodgers
Yes 17
No 61
Don’t know 22

JJ Watt
Yes 15
No 62
Don’t know 23

Odell Beckham, Jr.
Yes 13
No 65
Don’t know 22

Seton Hall Sports Poll, January 2016, Super Bowl and Politics

WHEN SUPER BOWL INTERSECTS POLITICAL SEASON, WHAT’S THE MOST COMPETITIVE CONTEST OUT THERE?
And Which Candidate Would You Want Coaching Your Team?

South Orange, NJ, January 28, 2016 — With the Super Bowl coming right as the presidential primary season “kicks off,” Americans said they were following the presidential contests by more than a 2-to-1 margin over football, with 60% choosing the political contests, and 24% the Super Bowl. 53% say the political races will be the most competitive, compared to 37% naming the Super Bowl. (By party, 35% name the Republican race, 18% the Democratic race).

The responses came in the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, which polled 771 Americans (by landline and cellphone across the nation) this week. The margin of error is 3.6%.

Blending sports and politics, Donald Trump was the choice of 32% when the Poll asked “which candidate would you like to have coach your favorite team?” Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders each received 15%. (Interestingly, among African-American respondents, a third named Clinton, about double any other candidate on the list).

The reasons for watching the Super Bowl are of course, varied. 40% said it was best explained because they were football fans, with 19% saying they were a fan of one of the participating teams, 18% saying it was a “big event,” and 10% interested in the commercials. Only 2% said it was primarily because they had a bet on the game, although in another question, 13% said they participated in wagering on the game.

SUPER BOWL COMMERCIALS AND THEIR IMPACT

Regarding commercials, 52% acknowledge that they watch Super Bowl commercials more closely than in other TV shows, with 39% saying “about the same.” 88% said seeing a product advertised in the Super Bowl would make no difference in their buying habits, and the remainder is split.

“This news reinforces the prices charged for Super Bowl ads,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “88% may say it doesn’t influence them, but when 52% say they pay more attention to ads during the game than in other TV shows– that’s a powerful number for advertisers to focus on.”

THE MANNING/ AL JAZEERA REPORT

Peyton Manning, whose name emerged recently as having been sent human growth hormones (the report was on Al Jazeera and was recanted by the source), was the subject of a question on whether that report changed opinions about him. (During the polling period, the NFL announced it would investigate the charges). A significant 11% said they thought “less favorably” of him, and 76% said it had no effect. 3% said they felt more favorably towards him.

PETE ROSE AND THE HALL OF FAME

Pete Rose, who will be inducted in the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame this year, was the subject of two questions, the first asking whether that was appropriate – to which 47% said yes, 33% no. The second asked if he should be eligible to be elected to the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, to which 56% said yes, 28% no.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND PLAYER SUSPENSIONS

A question was also asked whether a player being investigated for domestic violence offenses off the field should be suspended by his sport or allowed to play. 48% said the player should be suspended, and 39% said the player should be allowed to play. Broken down by gender men said allowed to play by 49%-43% over suspended. Among women, it was 52% suspended, 30% allowed to play.

For a fully produced podcast in which Seth Everett interviews Rick Gentile tonight, you may stream the podcast :  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/setonhallsportspoll/2016/01/29/january-2016–super-bowl-pete-rose-hall-of-fame

To download : https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467?mt=2

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone January 25-27 among 771 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.6 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com; or michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

The results

 

  1. Do you plan to watch the Super Bowl on Feb. 7?

Yes 68%

No 29

Don’t know 4

(IF NO SKIP TO QUESTION 3)

2. Which of the following best explains why you’ll be watching the Super Bowl?

I’m a fan of one of the teams 19

I’m interested in seeing the commercials 10

I’m a football fan 40

It’s a big event 18

I have a bet on the game 2

Other 9

Don’t know 3

 

3. In the next two weeks will you pay more attention to news about the upcoming Super Bowl or the presidential contests?

News about Super Bowl 24

Presidential contests 60

Don’t know 16

 

  1. Which do you think will be most competitive, the Republican presidential race, the Democratic presidential race or the Super Bowl?

Republican race                                      35

Democratic race                                     18

Super Bowl                                              37

Don’t know                                              10

 

  1. Of the following presidential candidates which would you like to have coach your favorite team, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders or Ted Cruz?

Trump                                                      32

Clinton                                                      15

Sanders                                                    15

Cruz                                                          15

Other                                                        10

Don’t know                                              13

 

  1. Do you tend to watch commercials in the Super Bowl more closely,

less closely or about the same as in other TV shows?

More closely                                            52

Less closely                                                9

About the same                                      39

 

 

  1. Would you be more likely to buy a product advertised on the Super Bowl, less likely or does it make no difference?

More likely                                               7

Less likely                                                 5

No difference                                        88

 

  1. Do you participate in any pools or wagering on the Super Bowl?

Yes                                                            13

No                                                             82

Prefer not to say                                       5

 

  1. Has the recent news concerning the risk of permanent injury to football players made you more interested, less interested or has it had no affect on your interest in the Super Bowl?

More interested                                      14

Less interested                                          9

No affect                                                   73

Don’t know                                                 5

 

10. A report last month by the news service Al Jazeera claimed that Peyton Manning and other sports stars were sent human growth hormones in 2011 by an anti-aging clinic despite the fact that it was recanted by the source. Did this story make you think more favorably of Manning, less favorably or did it have no effect on your opinion of him?

More favorably                                         3

Less favorably                                         11

No effect                                                  76

Don’t know                                                9

 

  1. Switching to baseball now, it was announced Pete Rose will be inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and have his number retired by the team. Do you think this is appropriate considering his ban for life by Major League Baseball for betting on games while active?

Yes                                                            47

No                                                             33

Don’t know                                              20

 

  1. Do you think Pete Rose should be eligible to be elected to baseball’s Hall of Fame in Cooperstown?

Yes                                                            56

No                                                             28

Don’t know                                              16

 

  1. The New York Yankees traded for a player who is being investigated by Major League Baseball for a domestic violence incident although he was not charged with a crime by authorities. Do you think players should be allowed to continue to play while being investigated for violent offenses or should they be suspended pending the results of the investigation?

Allowed to play                                       39

Suspended                                               48

Don’t know                                              13

  1. How closely do you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?

Very closely                                             18

Closely                                                      41

Not closely                                               27

Not at all                                                   14

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Working Response To Stadium Terror

By Sean Lintott

Jets-Cowboys_PregameWorking at a sports venue doesn’t seem like a dangerous job on the surface. I never entertained the idea that large sports venues like MetLife Stadium, where I intern, could be the target of a major terrorist attack. Maybe it was naivety, or maybe I just didn’t have any reason to have such a concern.

All of this changed after the tragedy that struck Paris on the evening of November 13, 2015. I received a message from my boss before seeing any of the news. I manage the stadium’s social media account and she instructed me not to respond to any messages regarding the terrorist attacks until the authorities make their statement and to immediately report any worrisome messages. After this message, I turned on the news and saw the horror that was unfolding in France. So many thoughts flooded my mind, but still, none of them involved my safety at work.

That Sunday, the Giants were hosting the New England Patriots. That morning, I woke up and did my typical morning routine. Then it was time to head to the stadium. When I arrived at the parking lot, I could sense a much larger police presence, but it wasn’t overwhelming by any means. I made it to the employee entrance of MetLife Stadium and that’s when it became apparent that this wasn’t going to be just another day at the office. It normally takes me about two or three minutes to get inside the stadium. That day, it took me over twenty minutes just to get to the metal detectors. Security personnel was doing very thorough scans of every employee before they went through the metal detectors. Once I was in the stadium and got to my office, you could feel a sense that everybody was slightly on edge. Personally, I settled in and started working on my responsibilities for the day.

An hour or two into my workday, I received a call from my mother. I could hear concern in her voice. She asked me if I was at work, if I felt safe, how much of a security presence there was, and a multitude of questions that you can imagine any mother would ask in this situation. I assured her that I felt safe and that security was doing a diligent job of screening everybody before they even got close to the venue. Once I thought that I’d convinced her of my safety, I got back to work. The game took place and everything felt mostly normal.

I refuse to live in fear of terrorism. Yes, there are bad people in this world that want to harm the innocent. However, living in fear is letting them win. They want to take freedom from the world and they want you to be afraid. This world is much stronger than that, though. For every person that wants to cause harm in this world, there are thousands of people that will do everything in their power to prevent that from happening.

So to answer the question the Sports Poll asked of the public after the terror attack at the soccer stadium in Paris: “How concerned does this make you in regard to attending a sporting event in a large venue in the United States?” I am not concerned about attending sporting events at large venues in the United Stated. Sports are one of my biggest passions, and nobody, not ISIS or any other group, can take that away from me.

Seton Hall Sports Poll November, 2015

73% OF AMERICANS SAY THEY ARE ‘CONCERNED ABOUT ATTENDING A SPORTING EVENT IN A LARGE VENUE’ IN WAKE OF PARIS ATTACKS

South Orange, NJ, November 19, 2015 — 73% of Americans say they are either very or somewhat concerned about attending a sporting event in a large venue, following the Paris attacks last week which included terrorist activity outside of Stade de France during a major soccer match.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll was conducted this week (Nov 16-18) among 879 random adults across the country, reached by landline and cellphone. 34% said they were very concerned, 39% said they were somewhat concerned, and 23% said it made no difference.  The Paris attacks took place last Friday.

The poll has a margin of error of 3.3%.

“This is a dramatic number, and something that should be noted by all sports leagues that play in large venues,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “Normally, Americans rally quickly and say ‘This will not change my way of life.’ But in this case, it has clearly given them pause.”

THREATENED STRIKE BY MISSOURI FOOTBALL GARNERS REACTION

The Poll also asked whether the threatened strike by the University of Missouri football team, in the wake of reaction to racial tensions on campus by the University president, was appropriate – the question being, “Do you think a school sponsored sports team should involve itself in campus politics?” On this the nation was evenly divided, with 44% saying yes and 46% no. However, among those 18-29, the “yes” received a 57% to a 37% “no,” while those over 60 were 38% to 50%.

PAY FOR STUDENT-ATHLETES? A SPIKE IN SUPPORT IS REGISTERED

The Poll regularly asks whether college athletes in revenue-generating sports should be compensated beyond scholarships. In the past, those saying yes has been fairly consistent, ranging from 21% in 2007 to 27% in 2011. This year (with the question saying “football players” as opposed to “athletes”), 36% said yes, which was up sizably from the 25% approval in 2013. “Public opinion is slowly shifting on this one,” noted Gentile. “Of course the majority still say ‘no,’ but we will be watching this.”

ONLINE FANTASY SPORTS CONTINUES TO DRAW MIXED OPINIONS

Despite all the recent attention paid to online fantasy sports (notably through DraftKings and FanDuel, and more recently, Yahoo!), the public remains consistent on whether these are games of skill or a form of gambling, and whether they should be legislated. 50% believe them to be a form of gambling, 30% say it is a game of skill, and 20% don’t know. In September, the numbers were 52%, 31% and 17%. As for whether states should be regulating the sites, (New York and Nevada have banned them), 51% say the states should regulate, and 35% say no. As for legality, 54% say the practice should be legal, 38% say it should be illegal and 9% don’t know. And finally, as to whether or not people agreed with the decision by the New York State Attorney General to order that Fan Duel and Draft Kings cease doing business in the state:

  • Agree                            38%
  • Disagree                       31
  • Don’t know                   31

BAN ALL RUSSIAN TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES FROM OLYMPICS?

With the World Anti-Doping Agency finding Russian track and field athletes guilty of systematic doping, people were asked whether Russian athletes should be banned from next year’s Olympics. 77% said only athletes testing positive should be banned, with just 14% saying the whole Russian track and field team should be banned.

The Agency has banned the guilty athletes from international competition.

Rick Gentile and Seth Everett talk about the results.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 16-18 among 879 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.3 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

The Results (all findings listed in %):

Fan Duel and Draft Kings, two daily fantasy sports websites, were ordered to cease doing business in New York State last week because they were deemed to be gambling sites. Do you agree with the decision by NY State or disagree?

  • Agree                            38%
  • Disagree                       31
  • Don’t know                   31

Do you think participation in daily fantasy sports is a form of gambling or is it a game of skill?

  • Form of gambling         50
  • Game of skill                  31
  • Don’t know                     20

Internet betting on sporting events is illegal in most states. Do you think playing daily fantasy sports on the internet should be illegal as well?

  • Yes                                    38
  • No                                     54
  • Don’t know                        9

Do you think betting on sporting events on the internet should be illegal?

  • Yes                                    40
  • No                                     47
  • Don’t know                      13

A number of states, including New Jersey and California, are discussing regulating of daily fantasy websites. Do you think these sites should be regulated by state governments?

  • Yes                                    51
  • No                                     35
  • Don’t know                      14

The University of Missouri football team threatened to strike and forfeit a game if the president of the university didn’t resign over his remarks about racial tensions on campus. Do you think a school sponsored sports team should involve itself in campus politics?

  • Yes                                    44
  • No                                     46
  • Don’t know                      10

College football generates enormous profits for many universities. Do you   think college football players should be compensated beyond the scholarships they receive?

  • Yes                                    36
  • No                                     57
  • Don’t know                        7

Russia has been banned from international track and field competitions pending a doping investigation of athletes and officials. If the allegations prove to be true do you think all Russian track and field athletes should be banned from next year’s Olympics, or only Russian track and field athletes who test positive for performance enhancing drugs should be banned?

  • All Russian track and field athletes should be banned            14
  • Only athletes testing positive should be banned                      77
  • Don’t know                                                                                         8

There was just a terror attack at a soccer stadium in Paris. How concerned does this make you in regard to attending a sporting event in a large venue in the United States?

  • Very concerned               34
  • Somewhat concerned    39
  • It makes no difference   23
  • Don’t know                         4

Public Divided on Whether Fantasy Sports Commercials Should Run During Televised Games; Governor Christie’s ‘Really?’ Comment on Debate May Have Rung True

South Orange, NJ, October 29, 2015 — Despite ongoing investigations by the Justice Department and the FBI into whether daily sports fantasy games are a form of gambling, the American public is divided on whether commercials for those sites should be appearing in televised sports events.

A Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week (Oct. 26-28) among 820 random adults across the country by landline and cellphone, found that 41% felt they should be able to advertise and 39% felt they should not. (20% said they did not know.)

The poll has a margin of error of 3.5%, making the result a statistical dead heat.

“The ads from DraftKings and FanDuel are ubiquitous,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “They are definitely a new and impactful part of the sports landscape. It happened, seemingly, overnight. But there is certainly no hard push-back by viewers about running these ads.

“It seems to harken what {N.J.} Governor {Chris} Christie said in the debate last night about playing fantasy sports as an issue – ‘really?’”

Only 4% of respondents said they participated in a baseball fantasy game.

The Poll also asked if sponsors who promote products (such as fantasy sports), in an environment where its athletes are forbidden to participate (college athletes may not gamble), should not be allowed to advertise on any college sports. By 59% to 34%, respondents said they should not. A similar margin – 56%-36% – felt that beer advertising should not appear on college sports telecasts.   (It currently does). The Poll also noted that the NCAA has said the ads will not run during their college basketball tournaments, and 47% felt that was a good decision, versus only 30% saying it was a bad decision. (23% did not know).

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World Series vs. NFL? Strong Gain for Baseball Shown in Preference

South Orange, NJ, October 29, 2015 — The World Series, which will go head-to-head against the NFL this Sunday (if a fifth game is necessary), has shown strong growth in such a match-up in the opinion of the American public, according to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week.

While a regular season NFL game is preferred over a World Series game by a 48%-36% margin, when Seton Hall asked the question five years ago, the NFL margin was 56%-22%. That is a shift from a 34% to 12% differential, and seems to match the ratings for Tuesday night’s Game One of the World Series, which was the highest in five years.

There were no clear differences in the percentages based on whether a baseball or a football game was being played on the day the question was asked.

“This is a strong trend for baseball,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “Despite the absence of household name stars in this year’s Kansas City-New York Mets matchup, the public is finding the games compelling.”

The Poll was conducted this week (October 26-28) among 820 random adults called on landlines and cellphones across the country. There is a margin of error of 3.5%.

Asked which they expected to be more competitive, the World Series or the political debate, 49% said the debate and 41% said the World Series. (The vast majority of respondents answered prior to the airing of the debate on CNBC, which began at 8 pm eastern time on the final day of polling).

In other findings, 45% felt the World Series takes place too late in the year (vs. 37% saying it was fine to end in November). When asked two years ago, 53% said it takes place too late, and 36% said it was okay as is.

59% said it didn’t matter if a baseball player acts out with a demonstrative gesture in a game (such as a bat flip or a pitcher’s gesture after a strikeout). 17% felt that was good for baseball and 15% said it was bad for baseball.

VIEWING HABITS STILL LOCKED INTO ‘OLD MEDIA’
BILLBOARD SPONSORS HAVE VIEWER ATTENTION

Although there are growing varieties of ways to watch sports, 83% still choose television and 7% choose “in person,” leaving only 5% who usually watch streaming video and 5% “other” or “none.” Streaming video was launched back in 2000 when Rick Gentile produced the Paralympic Games from Sydney, Australia for WeMedia, but now, 15 years later, it remains a small piece of the viewership pie.

Good news for billboard sponsors – 44% of respondents said they pay attention to sponsor signs in the stadium. Asked if they are more or less likely to purchase a product they see sponsoring sports events, only 9% said more likely and 85% said “no difference.” (Advertisers would surely dispute this finding). 6% said they would be less likely.

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