Monthly Archives: May 2021

More Than Half of Americans Want Vaccine Proof, Social Distancing and Masks As Sports Venues Move to Full Capacity

Among Sports Fans 60 Percent Favor Vaccine Requirement for Event Attendance;
72 Percent Want Social Distancing Sections

South Orange, NJ, May 26, 2021 – As many states move to “reopen” and allow full capacity at sports venues, sports fans and the general public seemingly remain cautious about event attendance without proof of vaccination, the wearing of masks and/or social distancing.

These were the findings of a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted May 21-24 geographically spread across the United States using a national representative sample weighted according to gender, age, ethnicity, education, income and geography based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. The Poll surveyed 1,554 adult respondents with a margin of error of +/- 3.2 percent.

Social Distance Seating
A rather large number – 68 percent of the general population, 72 percent of self-described sports fans and 77 percent of avid fans – favored designated areas within venues to separate those who wished to maintain social distance seating.

Proof of Vaccination
As to a requirement by sports teams that attendees of sporting events show proof of vaccination, 53 percent of the general population agreed. The number went up to 60 percent in favor of such a requirement among sports fans and to 71 percent for avid fans.

Masks
As for wearing masks while attending sporting events, it was 52 percent of the general population in favor of this requirement, while 56 percent of sports fans and 59 percent of avid fans agreed.

The respondents who disagreed with these precautionary requirements at sporting event venues were comparatively low. For special sections, it was 18-17-15 percent (general public, sports fans, avid fans); for vaccination proof, 32-29-20 percent disagreeing, and for mask wearing, 32-33-30 percent disagreeing.

Fans Who Would Attend Sporting Events with Vaccine, PPE and Social Distancing Up 7% Continue reading

Move the Pitching Rubber Back? Drop DH After Starting Pitcher Leaves? Sports Fans Approve Measures to ‘Build Excitement’

30 Percent of Fans Plan on Attending Game, 48 Percent Have Watched or Listened this Season

South Orange, NJ, May 4, 2021 – In a series of experiments sanctioned by Major League Baseball, the independent Atlantic League is slated to move the pitching rubber back from 60’6” to 61’6”, and to eliminate the designated hitter once the starting pitcher has been removed. These changes have been met with modest approval by sports fans across the country, and overwhelming approval by those who describe themselves as “avid fans.”

These were the findings of a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted April 23-26 geographically spread across the United States using a national representative sample weighted according to gender, age, ethnicity, education, income and geography based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. The Poll had 1,563 adult respondents with a margin of error of +/- 3.2 percent.

Changes
The Atlantic League will also experiment with other rule changes in 2021, with MLB said to be paying close attention to whether these changes increase offense. Moving the pitching rubber back is designed to give batters extra time to see a pitch, while eliminating the DH is intended to keep starting pitchers in the game longer.

The 60’6” distance was set in 1893 (moved back from 50 feet in response to a dominant pitcher) and has been used continuously ever since. The DH staying in the full game has been in use in the American League (but not the National) since the rule was created nearly a half century ago in 1973.

Both measures were met with a 41 percent approval rating from people who identify as sports fans, with 35 percent saying “no” to moving the rubber, and just 28 percent saying “no” to elimination of the DH. (The don’t know/no opinions were 24 and 31 percent, respectively).

On both rule changes, 59 percent of “avid fans” support the moves, while just 26 percent oppose them, giving the proposals a better than 2 to 1 margin in favor. In both instances, 15 percent of avid fans said they did not know or held no opinion.

Don’t Know/No Opinion Prevails for General Public
Continue reading