“Pirates Beyond Play” – Seton Hall Athletics Exhibit

Walsh Gallery Highlights Seton Hall’s Sport History

“Pirates Beyond Play”

Mon June 3 – Thurs Aug 8, 2019

The Walsh Gallery, in conjunction with the Monsignor William Noé Field Archives & Special Collections Center at Seton Hall University, presents “Pirates Beyond Play” (The History and Art of Setonia Athletics, 1856-2006) on display between Monday, June 3 – Thursday, August 8, 2019.  The exhibit was created and organized by Jeanne Brasile, Gallery Director and curated by University Archivist Alan Delozier.  This show focuses on the symbolic, intellectual and aesthetic importance of sports on the Seton Hall University campus.  Objects on display include artifacts such as vintage magazine covers, game programs, photographs, uniforms and other ephemera that give homage to numerous athletic achievements over the years.

University Archivist, Alan Delozier will present a gallery talk on the History of Athletics at Seton Hall and tour of the exhibit on Monday, June 10th from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.  An optional complimentary lunch is available.  To RSVP for the talk and/or lunch, please contact at: alan.delozier@shu.edu or (973) 275-2378.  The exhibition and talk are free and open to the public.

The Walsh Gallery is located on the first floor of Walsh Library located on the campus of Seton Hall University.  Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday, 10:30am to 4:30pm.  Additional information can be found via the Walsh Gallery website – https://library.shu.edu/walshgallery/current-exhibitions or (973) 275-2033.

 

The First Seton Hall Medical School & Its Roots – A Retrospective Exhibit, 1915-2015

When the announcement of plans to form a new medical school at Seton Hall became public in January of 2015 thoughts of future possibilities joined with remembrances of earlier strides in curative education opportunities on campus.  The original Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry was in operation within the walls of the Jersey City Medical Center between 1956-1965.  As the first formal medical school established in New Jersey, and one of the few Catholic university-sponsored institutions of its kind, this institution has a notable place in the annals of academic and state history.

Setonian_New Jersey welcomes opening of Seton Hall Medical-Dental College

This display traces the evolving popularity of medical inquiry and training over the past century through early course work at Seton Hall during the World War I-era with various natural science class offerings which remained a constant and helped to inspire creation of the School (and later College) of Nursing that evolved between 1937-40 and ultimately led to early attempts at developing a medical school on campus between the 1940s-50s.  Official approval was secured in 1954 and an elevated focus on health care to the community became a top priority through the development of specialized training methods, student support, and practical application which helped to sustain the school through its years of affiliation with Seton Hall.  With the closure of the College of Medicine and Dentistry in 1965 and transfer to the State of New Jersey, Seton Hall has since made additional attempts to promote medical instruction on an advanced level with the creation of a Graduate School of Medical Education in 1987 and the overall School of Health and Medical Sciences which currently sponsors this, and all related programs in the field.  The story of our second medical school remains to be written, but further information about the past and early planning objectives can be found within the article from the Setonian.

           New Jersey's first college of medicine and dentistry Seton Hall college of medicine and dentistry

Featured within this exhibit are documents and artifacts borrowed from our College of Medicine and Dentistry Collection and other materials from our University Archives and affiliated holdings.  Letters of support, operational reports, event programs, promotional publications, study aids, and various other documentation that traces the development of the school are presented chronologically and thematically to show how the first medical school was formed and what its mission entailed.

New Jersey's first medical-dental college, the Seton Hall college of medicine and dentistry

For more information about this exhibit and the research services offered through the Archives & Special Collections Center please feel free to access our homepage, or e-mail us with any specific questions or comments at: Alan.Delozier@shu.edu.  Thank you in advance for your interest and comments.

Archives Celebrates October Archives Month

October is American Archives Month

Welcome to Archives Month at the Msgr. William Noé Field Archives and Special Collections Center, ground floor, Walsh Library, opposite the Walsh Gallery.  We are offering three opportunities to get to know us:

Thursday, 16 October @ 3pm

Thursday 23 October @ 5:30pm

Thursday 30 October @ 11am

We will have some objects on display, provide a tour of areas that the public usually does not see: the processing area and the Vault where the materials are stored. And you can enjoy some snacks and ask us questions about our work, and how you can use the Archives.

We collect, preserve, and provide access to materials that maintain the history of Seton Hall University and of the Archdiocese of Newark. We have papers from each of the Presidents of Seton Hall and her schools and departments, many publications of the University, photographs of buildings, events and student activities as well as sports taken for yearbooks.  We also have yearbooks which began as the White and Blue, and became the Galleon when the teams took on the name of Pirates, and Setonian newspapers, both hard copies and microfilm.  [Don’t know what microfilm is?  Come see us!]

We also have papers from the Bishops and Archbishops of the Archdiocese of Newark, priest papers, papers on offices, parishes and ministries, on the Seminary, and on Catholic New Jersey outside the Archdiocese of Newark. In our Manuscript Collections we have papers of some New Jersey governors such as Richard Hughes and Brendan Byrne, and other political figures including Bernard Shanley and Leonard Dreyfuss.  There is a collection on Mother Seton and the Jevons family to which her family was related by marriage, and several collections in Jewish-Christian studies including the Msgr. Oesterreicher and Sr. Rose Thering Collections. We have rare books, mostly from prior to 1875, some from as early as the 15th century, and special collections in Irish literature and history, American Civil War, Arms and Armor, and more.  We also have objects related both to Seton Hall and to the Archdiocese.

Come and learn about our resources and how you can use them to aid your studies or just to satisfy a special interest in a particular topic. We hope to see you in October, during Archives Month.

Professor Connors Lecture, “World War I: A Centennial Perspective,” Wed, Oct. 8, 3 p.m.

Seton Hall University Professor Emeritus Richard Connors will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I with a lecture Wed., Oct. 8, 3 p.m. in the Walsh Library Archives Reading Room on the South Orange campus. “World War I: A Centennial Perspective,” will explore the military and geopolitical ramifications of the Great War that was supposed to be “the war to end all wars.” The public is invited to the free lecture.
“Historians see World War I as the defining event of the 20th century. It destroyed four empires and marked the end of a Europe-centered world,” said Connors. “What emerged were a new perspective and a new reality – a world society, a global economy, a world politics. When we think of the 20th century – of the U.S. and Japan as world powers, of Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin, of World War II and the Cold War, of Middle East and Balkan crises – the seeds go back to 1914-19.”
In conjunction with his lecture, Connors’ collection of World War I models, maps, books, posters and pictures are on exhibit at the Msgr. William Noé Field Archives and Special Collections Center in the University library.
We are pleased to have Dr. Connors bring his knowledge of World War I to Seton Hall and share his personal collection with us. A natural story-teller, his talk will generate interest in a war which saw “so many people die for so little reason” – a war which changed how wars are fought and how we see our country and our world. “Our personal and cultural perspectives are largely shaped by our history,” he said. “That’s why it is so important to revisit it regularly.”