Tag Archives: Poll Results

Sports Poll Featured in New York Times, Washington Post, Investor’s Business Daily, Forbes and More

The Seton Hall Sports Poll was featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, Investor’s Business Daily, Forbes and literally hundreds of other media outlets across the United States.Seton Hall Sports Poll

In Forbes, Sports Poll results were part of an article entitled, “NFL Anthem Protests Continue to Smack League’s Broadcasters and Sponsors.” The article was written by Mike Oznanian who, in addition to being Associate Managing Editor at Forbes, is co-host and Managing Editor of Forbes SportsMoney, a television show which appears on the YES Network and Fox Sports 1.

In Investor’s Business Daily, the Sports Poll’s Director, Rick Gentile, was cited regarding the decrease in NFL viewership and the Sports Poll’s findings that roughly 30% of those who are watching less professional football cite the anthem protests as the reason. “Companies Beware: Partisan Politics And Branding Don’t Mix.”

Sports Poll findings also appeared in The New York Times and at least a hundred other media outlets via a Reuters news agency article. The article, “Owner of NFL’s Texans sorry for ‘inmates’ comment on protesting players,” used the Poll’s most recent findings on the NFL’s anthem protests within the context of remarks made about the protests by an NFL team owner. The article, syndicated and appearing in media outlets such as Yahoo, ESPN and a number of local and regional radio and TV stations such as AM 1660 The Fan, Duke FM of Fargo and 96.3 Jack FM of Nashville, notes:

A Seton Hall University poll on Friday found 47 percent of respondents believe the NFL should order players to stand during the anthem, while 42 percent do not.

Most people, by a 55-to-37 percent margin, also said it was inappropriate for Trump to launch a recent petition on the Republican National Committee website saying the players should stand.

You can see the article, “Owner of NFL’s Texans sorry for ‘inmates’ comment on protesting players,” as it appeared in The New York Times.

In the Washington Post, the Sports Poll and its director were featured in an article entitled “Midway through NFL season, football ratings are down.”

Regarding ratings, the article notes:

Professor Rick Gentile“It’s certainly not cause for panic,” said Rick Gentile, a former CBS Sports executive and now a Seton Hall University professor, “but they like to keep going up.”

The article also notes that,

Asked about the impact of the protests, NFL spokesman Alex Riethmiller said the league believes the ratings drop is part of a broader trend in television consumption instead of a single issue or controversy.

Yet Gentile, who runs a nationwide poll on sports issues for Seton Hall, said his surveys show differently.

“I was in denial for a while,” he said, “but every time we asked the question, ‘why do you watch fewer games?’ it came back the same way — the protests.”

In the last week of September, Seton Hall’s poll of 850 people found that half were watching the same number of football games they watched in the past. Twenty-nine percent said they watched fewer games, 5 percent said they watched more and the remainder didn’t know. Of the people who watched fewer games, 47 percent said it was because of the protests, by far the most frequent reason cited.

In addition to the Washington Post, the article, a syndicated Top News story from the Associated Press, appeared on ABC News, Fox Business, Fox Sports, Yahoo Sports, the Miami Herald and hundreds of others including the Honolulu Star Advertiser, Indiana’s Journal Gazette, The Tribune of San Luis Obispo, The Connecticut Post, Minnesota’s Star Tribune, The Reading Eagle and far too many more to list.

You can see the article, “Midway through NFL season, football ratings are down,” as it appeared in the Washington Post.

You can see here the most recent sports poll, which included questions that gauged the public pulse on safety issues in youth football, replacing baseball umpires with computers and the abundance of home runs in Major League Baseball in addition to the questions on the NFL’s anthem protests.

Americans Throw Penalty Flags at Both Goodell and Trump for their Positions on the NFL Stand/Kneel Issue

Americans Throw Penalty Flags at Both Goodell and Trump for their Positions on the NFL Stand/Kneel Issue; 82% Say ‘Advise Parents on Risk of Youth Football’

South Orange, NJ, October 27, 2017 — By a 47% to 42% margin, Americans believe that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell should have ordered the league’s players to stand during the national anthem.

By a wider margin – 55% v. 37% – people said it was inappropriate for President Trump to request that people sign a petition saying that the players stand.

These were among the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted this week across the nation among 715 adults, on landlines and cellphones.  The poll has a margin of error of 3.7%.

“The president’s base, which polls consistently show to be in the 35% area, seems to support him at every turn without wavering, and that extends to his war of words with the NFL,” said Rick Gentle, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute as part of the university’s Stillman School of Business.  “The 37% support on this question is consistent with that.”

“But clearly,” added Gentile, “Goodell’s position lacks strong public support.  “This is a tough issue for people who love football, love the flag, and still respect freedom of expression.”

MATTERS OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IN YOUTH FOOTBALL ADDRESSED

The Poll also asked a number of questions related to the safety of youth football.  Asked if football organizing groups should have medical personnel advise parents about the dangers of playing organized football before their child signs up to play, a huge 82% said yes, with only 11% saying no.

Asked if they thought youth football leagues through high school are taking adequate steps to improve the safety of the game, 49% said yes, and only 22% said no.

Respondents were also asked at what age he or she would allow a child to play football, 39% said ages 7-11, 27% said ages 12-15, and only 9% said age 16 and over.  20% responded “never.”

“It is significant that one in five – 20% – say ‘never’ for the sport considered the most popular one in America,” noted Gentile.

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic (and yesterday’s release on baseball questions) with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at https://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 23-25 among 715 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

  1. After a meeting with players and owners last week, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced he will not order the players to stand for the pre-game playing of the national anthem. Do you agree with his position or disagree?
    1. Agree 42%
    2. Disagree 47
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 11

 

  1. President Trump has asked people to sign a petition saying that they support standing for the national anthem in response to the NFL not insisting its players do so. Do you think it’s appropriate for the president to make such a request?
    1. Yes 37
    2. No 55
    3. Don’t know   8

 

 

 

  1. If you were to allow your child to play football, at what age would you allow him to play, 7-11, 12-15, 16 or older or never?
    1. 7-11 39
    2. 12-15 27
    3. 16+   9
    4. Never 20
    5. Don’t know/No opinion   6

 

  1. Do you think youth football leagues through high school are taking adequate steps to improve the safety of the game?
    1. Yes 49
    2. No 22
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 29

 

  1. Do you think football organizing groups should have medical personnel advise parents about the dangers of playing organized football before their child signs up to play?
    1. Yes 82
    2. No 11
    3. Don’t know/No opinion   7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balls and Strikes Via Computer? Baseball Fans Shout ‘Keep the Umpire’

75% say they prefer an umpire to a computer making balls and strikes call; one third think undetected drugs are driving all those homers

South Orange, NJ, October 26, 2017 — In a week in which a record number of home runs were hit in a single World Series game…..and post-season coverage provides continuous use of the strike zone boundaries for each pitch….fans are clear that they want umpires – and not a computer – calling balls and strikes…..but also suspicious of the use of performing enhancing drugs driving all those homers.

These were among the findings in the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted this week across the nation among 715 adults, on landlines and cellphones.  The baseball data is based on the 62% of respondents that follow baseball and has a margin of error of 4.8%.

Perhaps driven by the umpire calls when the strike zone box is up, (or perhaps just by being traditionalists), a strong 75% preferred that the umpire make the ball-strike calls, with only 11% opting for computer calls.  (14% had no opinion).

“Either fans are leaning toward the more traditional way of doing things or they simply don’t want to give up their God-given right to bash the umpire for missing ball and strike calls,” said Rick Gentle, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute as part of the university’s Stillman School of Business.”

On the matter of home runs, of which a record number were hit this season in the Major Leagues, respondents were asked to say “yes” or “no” to a variety of factors.

Reasons for Record Number of Home Runs:

 

Yes      No

A more lively ball                               29        40

Undetected use of PEDs                   31        46

Improved batting techniques          62        20

Hitters more focused on HRs           55        24

Bad pitching                                        28        48

“While performance enhancing drugs are not among the top reasons, the fact that nearly 1 in 3 fans think it’s still part of the game should be alarming to the Commissioner’s Office,” noted  Gentile.

“Obviously the balls are juiced,” Houston pitcher Dallas Keuchel told USA Today, today.  “I think they’re juiced 100%.”

On pace-of-play, another much discussed issue among baseball people, fans were pretty evenly divided, favoring by 43%-40% a rule restricting in-inning mound meetings….but stayed traditional on limiting in-inning pitching changes, voting “no” by 57%-26%.

“The latter would be a major rule change which would need approval of the player’s union as well as the Commissioner’s Office, and clearly among fans, there is no desire to go there,” said Gentile.

The Poll also asked,  “how often would you say you watch an entire live post-season baseball game,” with 45% saying “occasionally,” 26% saying “often” and 17% saying “never”.

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile will be posted later today.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 23-25 among 715 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

 

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow baseball, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
    1. Very closely 11
    2. Closely 23
    3. Not closely 30
    4. Not at all 37

 

(IF “NOT AT ALL” SKIP TO DEMOGRAPHICS)

  1. This season, more home runs were hit in the major leagues than ever in history. Please tell me which of the following reasons you think could be responsible, a more lively ball?
    1. Yes 29
    2. No 40
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 32

 

  1. Undetected use of performance enhancing drugs by players
    1. Yes 31
    2. No 46
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 23

 

  1. Improved batting techniques
    1. Yes 62
    2. No 20
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 19

 

  1. Hitters more focused on home run hitting
    1. Yes 55
    2. No 24
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 22
  2. Bad pitching
  3. Yes 28
  4. No 48
  5. Don’t know/No opinion 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. How often would you say you watch an entire live post-season baseball game, often, occasionally or never?
    1. Often 26
    2. Occasionally 45
    3. Never 17
    4. Don’t know/No opinion 12

 

 

 

  1. Would you be in favor of a rule restricting the number of in-inning mound meetings in an attempt to speed up the game?
    1. Yes 43
    2. No 40
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 17

 

  1. Would you be in favor of a rule restricting the number in-inning pitching changes in an attempt to speed up the game?
    1. Yes 26
    2. No 57
    3. Don’t know 17

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Would you like to see balls and strikes called by a computer rather than an umpire behind home plate?
    1. Computer 11
    2. Umpire 75
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 14

 

 

Seton Hall Law Professor Charles Sullivan in ESPN Article on Legal Ramifications of Benching NFL Anthem Protesters

Seton Hall Law Professor and Associate Dean, Charles Sullivan, was featured in an ESPN article regarding the legal ramifications, if any, for NFL teams that bench players for participating in protests during the national anthem before games.

Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys, has indicated that he would “bench” players that do not stand for the national anthem.

Sullivan, a noted expert in employment law who has published three of the leading legal casebooks on the subject, appeared in an article entitled, “Is it legal for Jerry Jones to bench players who do not stand?”

Debate surrounding the protests has been heated and, according to our most recent Sports Poll, has resulted in a decline in NFL viewership.

As this graphic from Fox News shows, of those who are watching fewer games, more than half attribute the decrease to the anthem protests (47% in disapproval, 6% as a show of solidarity with the players).

And the number who said they are watching less NFL games is substantial. The New York Post, citing our poll headlined it succinctly: “30 Percent are Watching Less — and Most Blame Anthem.”

Although football is a game, the NFL is a multi-billion dollar business, the players employees and the owners employers.

Given that the NFL relies heavily upon its TV contracts and those contracts are based upon the advertising revenue that mass viewership brings, it is not surprising that a decline in viewership based primarily upon one issue has that issue becoming a paramount concern for NFL owners.

As the ESPN article notes, beyond the presidential twitterstorm, social media campaigns and various boycotts both for and against the anthem protests:

According to a half-dozen experts we contacted, workplace employment law may have the last word. While the experts are divided on who would win such a legal battle, our sample ruled narrowly in favor of the owners.

Charles Sullivan, professor of law, Seton Hall University: “Where I think the players have a problem is there’s not really an adverse employment action if they are simply benched. They are still being paid, and I don’t think they necessarily have the right to play in games.”
Advantage: Owners

You can read the full article here, “Is it legal for Jerry Jones to bench players who do not stand?

You can read more about the most recent Sports Poll and its media coverage here: http://www.shu.edu/business/news/seton-hall-sports-poll-featured-in-media-nationwide.cfm

 

Poll Finds Americans Favor Protective Foul Line Netting in Baseball Stadiums, Except for the Young

South Orange, NJ, October 5, 2017 — A poll conducted by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that by an overall margin of 49% to 31, Americans believe that baseball stadiums should extend netting down the foul lines to protect fans from foul balls and wayward bats. The remaining 20% either did not know or had no opinion.

When broken down according to age, however, a different view appears: 18-29 year old respondents reached the opposite conclusion, opposing the extension of protective netting by a 39% to 33% margin.

In fact, the number in favor of protective netting along foul lines in baseball stadiums rose in correlation to age group.

Ages 18 – 29, 39% opposed installation of protective netting while 33% were in favor

Ages 30 – 49, 49% favored installation of protective netting while 36% opposed

Ages 45 – 59, 52% favored installation of protective netting while 30% opposed

Ages 60+, 56% favored installation of protective netting while 23% opposed

“Clearly the concerns about safety grow as our respondents get older. It’s rare that such a direct correlation occurs from age group to age group,” noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute as part of the University’s Stillman School of Business.

The New York Yankees recently announced that they would “significantly expand” the protective netting at Yankee Stadium after a toddler was seriously injured when struck in the face by a foul ball.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday last week.  It has a margin of error of 3.4%.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

84% Support NFL Players’ Right to Protest, But Vary on How to Carry that Out; Only 16% Say Protesters Should Be Dropped from Teams

84% Support NFL Players’ Right to Protest, But Vary on How to Carry that Out;
Only 16% Say Protesters Should Be Dropped
from Team. Wide Discrepancy Between African-Americans and Whites

South Orange, NJ, September 28, 2017 — A poll conducted this week by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that 84% of American support the NFL players’ right to protest,    with only 16% saying the players should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse.

Of the 84% supporting the players’ right to protest, 49% felt they should find a different way to express their political opinions, and 35% felt that not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest.  There was a wide racial gap in those saying it was an acceptable form of protest.with  70% of African-American choosing that option  only 28% of whites doing so.

The poll of 845 adults (on both landline and cellphone) was conducted across the US on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday of this week.  It has a margin of error of 3.4%.

An identical question was asked a year ago about just Kaepernick.  At that time, 80% supported the right to protest and 20% believed they should be dropped from the team if they refused an order to stand.

Asked specifically this week about players not standing during the playing of the anthem, 44% of all respondents disapproved, 32% approved, and 25% had no opinion or did not know.  The responses to the same question about just Kaepernick a year ago were 47% disapproval and 27% approval.

“These attitudes are remarkably stable given all that has happened in this past year and the recent spike in attention being paid to the subject. , noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute.

Respondents were asked whether they agreed more with President Trump who called on NFL owners to fire any players who refuse to stand or with Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners who called the president’s comments divisive

Trump received the support of 28% and Goodell received  50%.  Among African-Americans Trump received 6% vs 78% for Goodell, and whites were 32% to 47%.

Asked about Kaepernick’s lack of a contract by an NFL team, 47% felt it was because of his protests and 19% because he wasn’t good enough.  81% of African-Americans felt it was because of his protest with only 7% saying it was because he was not good enough, while among whites the ratio was 41% (protest) and 22% (ability).

“This is an emotional issue for many people with obvious differences between whites and African-Americans,” said Gentile.  “The overall support for the players’ right to protest – in some form – is heartening especially considering some of the divisive rhetoric we’ve heard revolving around this issue.”

The protests can be very damaging to the NFL’s popularity.  29% of respondents said they were watching fewer games this season, and of that group, 47% cited the player protests during the national anthem.

In an identical question asked in November 2016, 25% said they were watching fewer games because of the anthem protest.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 25-27 among 845 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results:

  1. This season, do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?
  2. More   5%
  3. Fewer 29
  4. About the same 50
  5. Don’t know 16

(IF “FEWER” ASK QUESTION 2.  IF “MORE”, “SAME”, OR “DON’T KNOW” SKIP

QUESTION 2

Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following:

  1. The games aren’t as good as in past years   3
  2. Too many games on TV   2
  3. Too many commercial interruptions   4
  4. The players’ protests during the national anthem 47
  5. Boycotting in support of player protests   6
  6. Bothered by danger of head injuries   1
  7. Other 21
  8. Don’t know 15

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick waged a protest last season by kneeling during the national anthem. This year other players have continued the protest by not standing during the playing of the anthem. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about the gesture?
    1. Approve 32
    2. Disapprove 44
    3. No opinion 22
    4. Don’t know   3

 

  1. Which of the following statements do you agree with most:
  2. I don’t support the players’ right to protest and believe they should be ordered to stand for the anthem or be dropped from the team if they refuse 16
  3. I support the players’ right to protest but believe they should stand for the anthem, finding a different way to express their political opinions 49
  4. I support the players’ right to protest and I think not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest                       35

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick has not been signed by an NFL team and some say it is because of last year’s protest. Do you think he would be signed today if he had not protested or has he not been signed because he’s not a good enough player?
    1. Protested 47
    2. Not good enough 19
    3. Don’t know/No opinion 34

 

  1. President Trump has called on NFL owners to fire any player who refuses to stand for the national anthem. Commissioner Roger Goodell and several NFL owners have responded that the president’s comments were divisive. Whom do you most agree with?
    1. President Trump 28
    2. Commissioner Goodell and the owners 50
    3. Neither (DON’T READ)   7
    4. Both (DON’T READ)   2
    5. Don’t know/No opinion 13
  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
    1. Very closely 24
    2. Closely 33
    3. Not closely 30
    4. Not at all 13

(IF “VERY CLOSELY”, “CLOSELY”, OR “NOT CLOSELY” ASK QUESTION .  IF “NOT AT ALL” SKIP QUESTION )

8. How closely would you say you follow the NFL, very closely, closely, not closely, or not at all?

  1. Very closely 20
  2. Closely 31
  3. Not closely 28
  4. Not at all 22

 

 

 

With NFL and NHL Moving into Vegas, Nearly Half See Likelihood of Players, Refs, Officials Betting on Outcomes

South Orange, NJ, April 13, 2017 — With the NFL and NHL about to move into Las Vegas for the first time, nearly half of the US population foresees the increased likelihood of players, referees or team officials gambling on the outcome of games.

A Seton Hall Sports Poll found that 46% responded yes to the question of increased likelihood for gambling on games, while 42% thought the likelihood would not increase.

The poll, conducted this week asked 687 adults (on both landline and cellphone) whether professional teams should be making their home in Las Vegas, and 47% responded yes, with only 27% no.  26% said they had no opinion.  The poll, sponsored by The Sharkey Institute, has a margin of error of 3.8%.

When asked if the move to Las Vegas will tarnish the league’s reputation, 21% said it would harm the NFL and 19% said it would harm the NHL.

“Those are high negatives,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll.  “It is hard to imagine any other major American city that would provoke such concern.”

On the matter of Las Vegas taxpayers funding the playing facilities, 45% approved of the practice, with 40% expressing disapproval and 15% registering “don’t know.”  The numbers showed a dramatic demographic shift – 52% of those 18-29 approved public financing, while only 37% of those 60+ registered approval.

The NCAA has taken a couple of controversial positions on locating championship games.  It refuses to host a championship in Las Vegas, and 50% approve of that decision with only 32% disapproving.  It has also taken a stance that they will not put championship games in states that have so-called anti-LGBT laws.  45% agree with the NCAA’s position; 37% disapprove, and 18% had no opinion.

One in Four Sees Need for More Women Coaching Women’s Teams

The Poll asked several questions regarding women’s sports and women coaches. The public seems perfectly fine with men coaching women’s teams (82% approve), and with women coaching men’s teams (80% approval).  But one in four people (25%) thought it was a problem that the great majority of women’s sports teams (collegiate and professional) are coached by men.

59% said they felt there was “not enough ” coverage of women’s sports by the media, with 30% saying it was the right amount and only 3% saying it was “too much.”

“While people state there isn’t enough coverage of women’s sports,” said Gentile, “media isn’t incentivized to provide additional coverage because viewership and interest has been minimal. It’s a bit chicken and egg; more interest yields more coverage, or does more coverage garner more interest.”

A podcast on these questions conducted by Seth Everett will be available later today; questions and results below.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone April 10-12 among 687 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall, Michael Ricciardelli
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

The results:

  1. The Oakland Raiders have announced their intention to move to Las Vegas and will play in a stadium largely funded by the public. The National Hockey League has also announced that a new team would be located in Vegas. Do you think professional sports franchises should be making their home in Las Vegas considering it’s the sports gambling capital of the U.S.?
  1. Yes 47%
  2. No 27
  3. Don’t know 26
  1. Do you think it will tarnish the reputation of the NFL to have a Las Vegas based franchise?
  1. Yes 21
  2. No 69
  3. Don’t know 10
  1. Do you think it will tarnish the reputation of the NHL to have a Las Vegas based franchise?
  1. Yes 19
  2. No 70
  3. Don’t know 11
  1. Do you think being Vegas based would increase the likelihood of players, referees or team officials gambling on the outcome of games?
  1. Yes 46
  2. No 42
  3. Don’t know 12
  1. It is common for cities, like Las Vegas, to publicly fund a stadium in order to attract a professional team. Do you approve or disapprove of this practice?
  1. Approve 45
  2. Disapprove 42
  3. Don’t know 12
  1. Despite two professional franchises soon to be residing in Las Vegas, the NCAA refuses to host a championship there. Do you approve or disapprove of the NCAA’s stance?
  2. Approve 50
  3. Disapprove 32
  4. Don’t know/No opinion 19
  1. The NCAA has moved collegiate championships out of states because of what it has referred to as anti-LGBT laws. Do you approve or disapprove of the NCAA’s stance?
  1. Approve 45
  2. Disapprove 37
  3. No opinion/Don’t know 18
  1. Do you approve or disapprove of men coaching women’s sports teams?
  1. Approve 82
  2. Disapprove   9
  3. No opinion/Don’t know   9
  1. Do you approve or disapprove of women coaching men’s sports teams?
  1. Approve 80
  2. Disapprove 13
  3. No opinion/Don’t know   8
  1. Do you think it’s a problem that the great majority of women’s sports teams, both on the collegiate and professional level, are coached by men?
  1. Yes 25
  2. No 64
  3. Don’t know 11
  1. Do you think there is too much coverage of women’s sports by the media, not enough coverage or the right amount of coverage?
  1. Too much   3
  2. Not enough 59
  3. Right amount 30
  4. Don’t know   9

 

 

Young People Show Greater Support for Legalized Sports Gambling, but Overall Nation Divided

Strong support for sports gambling being regulated on a State-by-State basis

South Orange, NJ, February 23, 2017 – If younger people are to set the trend for the future of legalized gambling in America, they are certainly showing support for the concept today.

Asked by the Seton Hall Sports Poll this week, “It’s been said a lot of people bet on sporting events anyway, so government should allow it and tax it. It’s also been said legal betting on sporting events is a bad idea because it promotes too much gambling and damages the integrity of sports. Which comes closer to your view?”…….

…….46% of Americans stated support for allowing betting on sporting events, while 42% said it was bad idea. This is a substantial increase from 2010 when a Fairleigh Dickinson poll showed 39% of Americans supported it, with 54% saying it was a bad idea.

Younger people are twice as likely to say “allow it” than those over 60. There is a clear age trend in support by age group: 67% of 18-29, 48% of 30-44, 42% of 45-59 and 30% of 60+.

The poll was conducted February 20-22 among 626 adults across the country on both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of 4.0 %.

“If younger people carry those beliefs forward, and as they become lawmakers themselves, we could see a major shift in the legality of sports gambling,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

But where will the shift occur? A growing number of people, representative of general trends in the US, believe it should be on a state-by-state basis. 70% of all respondents support regulation on a state-by-state basis, with only 21% saying gambling should be regulated by the federal government. When asked this question in November 2014, 61% said state-by-state, and 29% said federal government.

The age trend also was also demonstrable on a question of whether it was appropriate for NBA Commissioner Adam Silver’s to call for legalized betting on a strictly regulated basis: 56% of those 18-29 supported his stance as appropriate, 34% of those 30-44, 28% of those 45-59 and 21% of those 60+ supported the stance.

Similarly, addressing New Jersey’s attempt of recent years to allow for sports gambling, 61% of those 18-29 said they should have passed the law, while 50% of those 30-44, 47% of those 45-59 and 33% of those 60+ supported it.

Daily fantasy games, a recent entry into the sports gambling discussion, attracts young people far more than older ones. While nationwide, only 15% say that have participated, the number is 24% for those 18-29, 11% for those 45-59, and only 6% for those 60+. 61% of all respondents believe those daily fantasy games are a form of gambling, with 23% calling them a game of skill.

Asked “have you ever gambled on a sporting event?” 31% of all respondents said yes, 66% said no. This is in line with the same question, asked in November 2014, at which time 33% said yes, 67% no.

A podcast in which Seth Everett interviews Rick Gentile will be available shortly.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone February 20-22 among 626 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations , AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

The results:

  1. It’s been said a lot of people bet on sporting events anyway, so government should allow it and tax it. It’s also been said legal betting on sporting events is a bad idea because it promotes too much gambling and damages the integrity of sports. Which comes closer to your view?

Allow it 46%

Bad idea 42

Don’t know 12

 

  1. A while ago NBA Commissioner Adam Silver reversed the league’s historical stance and advocated legalized betting on sporting events on a strictly regulated basis. Do you think it’s appropriate for the leader of a major professional sports league to take such a stance?

Yes 34

No 51

Don’t know 15

  1. A few years ago, New Jersey passed a law allowing for sports gambling in the state. The major sports leagues and the NCAA successfully lobbied for an injunction to block the law because they said gambling on sporting events damaged the integrity of the game. Do you think New Jersey should have been able to pass a law allowing sports betting in the state?

Yes 47

No 39

Don’t know 13

  1. Four states (Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon) are exempt from a federal law passed in 1992 that banned betting on sporting events. With which of the following statements do you agree?

The law should be left as it is 18

The law should be changed to allow all states to legalize sports betting if   they choose to do so. 45

Legalized sports betting should be outlawed in the four states in which it’s now legal 23

Don’t know 15

 

 

  1. Do you think publishing point spreads in newspapers and on line encourages betting on sporting events?

Yes 53

No 36

Don’t know 11

  1. If gambling on sporting events was legalized do you think it should be regulated on a state-by-state basis or by the federal government?

State-by-state 70

Federal government 21

Don’t know 10

  1. Have you ever gambled on a sporting event?
  2. Yes 31
  3. No 66
  4. Refuse to answer 3

 

(IF NO TO PREVIOUS QUESTION)

 

  1. If gambling on sporting events was legalized do you think you would place a bet?

Yes 13

No 80

Don’t know 8

  1. Commissioner Silver stated that gambling has become a popular form of entertainment in the United States. Do you agree or disagree?

Agree 69

Disagree 22

Don’t know 9

 

  1. Baseball spring training has just begun in Florida and Arizona. Do you plan on participating in a baseball fantasy league this season?

Yes 2

No 91

Don’t know 6

  1. Have you ever participated in any of the daily fantasy games for any sports?

Yes 15

No 81

Don’t know 4

  1. Do you think participating in fantasy activities is a game of skill and therefore should be exempt from gambling laws or is it just another form of gambling?

Game of skill 23

Gambling 61

Don’t know 17

 

Poll: Modest Support for Pro Teams in Vegas, Almost No Support for Public Funding of Stadiums

South Orange, NJ, February 13, 2017 – The American public feels that if an NFL team – presumably the Oakland Raiders – moved to Las Vegas, it would be okay with them, despite the city’s position as the center of legalized sports gambling.

Asked in a Seton Hall Sports Poll last week how they felt about the Raiders possibly relocating there (in a publicly funded stadium), 40% said it was okay, 31% said it was not, and 29% undecided.

The poll was conducted February 6-8 among 661 adults across the country on both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of 3.9 %.

“I’m sure you wouldn’t get 31% saying no for any other city,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “But a majority of those expressing an opinion still supports the concept despite no major league team having yet played a game there.” (The NHL is putting a team there next season).

As for the public funding of a stadium, 75% felt the team should fund it with only 6% saying the public should fund it.

“The public funding issue seldom varies, with the city in question usually getting local support because of the expected business growth it brings in,” said Gentile. “This doesn’t always pan out, but the arguments on the local level usually resonate.”

BY 66%-12% PUBLIC SAYS KEEP OLYMPIC HOCKEY OUT OF NHL LABOR NEGOTIATIONS

The poll also asked a hockey question, in light of National Hockey League Commissioner Gary Bettman’s position saying he is against the league participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics unless the players agree to extend the current collective bargaining agreement.   Poll participants were asked if they felt it was appropriate to use the Olympics as leverage in a labor negotiation.  Only 12% said yes, with 66% voicing no, and 22% “don’t know.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone February 6-8 among 661 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations (212) 245-1772, AppelPR@gmail.com; Rick Gentile (917) 881-9489.

 

The results:

 

 

 

  1. The Oakland Raiders have announced they would like to move to Las Vegas and will play in a new stadium largely funded by the public. Do you think professional sports franchises should be making their home in Las Vegas considering it’s the sports gambling capital of the U.S.?
  2. Yes 40%
  3. No 31
  4. Don’t know 29

 

  1. Do you think the public should be funding stadiums and arenas to attract professional franchises or should these organizations pay for construction of their own stadiums?
  2. Public should fund 6%
  3. Organization should fund75
  4. Don’t Know 18

 

  1. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman has said he’s against the NHL participating in the 2018 Olympics unless the players agree to extend the current collective bargaining agreement. Do you think it’s appropriate to use participation in the Olympics as leverage in a labor negotiation?
  2. Yes 12%
  3. No 66
  4. Don’t know 22

 

Cord Cutting Can Wait – 98 Percent Watched Super Bowl on TV; Public Says Brady ‘Best Ever’

South Orange, NJ, February 9, 2017 – An era of cord-cutting may loom in the future, but for now, traditional television viewing of the Super Bowl has a firm grasp on the American public. According to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week in the days after the game, a whopping 98% watched on TV, with only a combined 1% – barely – watching on phone, tablet or computer.

The poll was conducted February 6-8 among 661 adults across the country on both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of 3.9 %.

“It’s the biggest event of the year in America, and people want to watch it on their biggest and most reliable device,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

Meanwhile, asked if Tom Brady is the greatest quarterback in NFL history, 63% of those who identified as sports fans agreed with only 19% disagreeing. Of those who said they were NFL fans, 51% agreed, and 21% disagreed. Among the general population, 39% agreed, with only 21% disagreeing.

“These are remarkably high numbers, given the controversies surrounding him – a large dislike for the New England Patriots, his suspension over ‘deflategate’ and his support of a controversial President,” said Gentile.

In the excitement following the first overtime in Super Bowl history and the fifth Super Bowl win for the Patriots, 44% found the game the most compelling of recent championships, with Game 7 of the World Series registering 26% and the college football championship (Alabama-Clemson) at 11%.

“For the World Series to be named by one out of four Americans, three months after it ended and in the days after a thrilling Super Bowl is great news for baseball,” added Gentile.

Asked if they saw any commercials during the game that made them want to purchase the advertised product, 83% said no, and 12% yes.

“People generally don’t acknowledge that commercials influence their buying,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.  “Of course, their purchasing habits show the opposite – advertising drives sales. And 12% of the viewing public is a very large number. Advertisers should be pleased.”

7% said they enjoyed the commercials the most, but 13% named the halftime show and 72% said “the game” when asked what they enjoyed the most.

A commercial for GNC, the vitamin chain which sells substances banned by the NFL, was not shown. Asked whether GNC should have been allowed to advertise in the game, given that the banned products were not mentioned, 50% said yes they should have been allowed, with 23% saying no.

10% acknowledged wagering on the game (either through a bet, a pool or a fantasy league) and 84% said they had no wager on the game. 15% said they would have bet if wagering was legal.

A podcast in which Seth Everett interview Rick Gentile can be heard at https://t.co/bqIjtpjD64

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone February 6-8 among 661 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University,
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

 

The results:

  1. Did you watch the Super Bowl game on Sunday?
  2. Yes 72%
  3. No 28

(IF NO SKIP TO QUESTION 6)

 

  1. Where did you watch the game? (Don’t read options)
  2. At home 75
  3. At a friend’s house 17
  4. In a bar or restaurant 5
  5. Somewhere else  3

 

  1. What was the primary device you used to watch the game, a TV, phone, tablet or computer?
  2. TV 98
  3. Phone 0
  4. Tablet 0
  5. Computer 1
  6. Other 1

 

  1. Which did you enjoy more, the game, the halftime or the commercials?
  2. Game 72
  3. Halftime 13
  4. Commercials 7
  5. Don’t Know 7

 

  1. Did you see any commercials during the broadcast that made you want to purchase the product advertised?
  2. Yes 12
  3. No 83
  4. Don’t know 5

 

  1. Did you place a bet on the outcome of the game, participate in a pool, engage in fantasy play or not wager any money on the game?
  2. Bet  5
  3. Pool 4
  4. Fantasy 1
  5. No Wager 84
  6. Don’t Know/No Ans. 7

 

  1. If sports gambling was legal in your state would you have placed a bet on the game?
  2. Yes 15
  3. No 79
  4. Don’t know 6

 

  1. Tom Brady is being called the greatest quarterback in NFL history after winning his 5th Super

Bowl. Do you agree, disagree or are you not sure?

  1. Agree 39
  2. Disagree 21
  3. Not Sure 35
  4. Don’t Know 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. GNC, a maker of dietary supplements, was forced by the NFL to withdraw its commercial from the Super Bowl because it makes some products that NFL players are banned from taking. No mention of the banned products occurred in the commercial. Do you think GNC should have been allowed to advertise in the game given that the banned products were not mentioned?
  2. Yes 50
  3. No 23
  4. Don’t know 27

 

  1. Which event did you think was more compelling, the Super Bowl, the college football championship or the 7th game of the World Series?
  2. Super Bowl 44
  3. College championships 11
  4. World Series 26
  5. Don’t Know 19

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 19
  3. Closely 33
  4. Not closely 33
  5. Not at all 16

 

  1. Do you consider yourself a fan of NFL football?
  2. Yes 56
  3. No 40
  4. Don’t know 5

 

 

Sports Poll Podcast, with Rick Gentile and Seth Everett 11.21.16

IBM Computer TechnicianClick below to hear or download a discussion on the findings of the most recent Seton Hall Sports Poll release– featuring veteran sportscaster and analyst Seth Everett with Rick Gentile, Director of the Sports Poll and 10 time Emmy Award winner for his work as Executive Producer and Senior Vice President of CBS Sports.

Streaming link : http://tobtr.com/9624753

Download : https://t.co/1Ao9Tijmcj

Nearly 20 Percent Watch Live Sports on Mobile Devices or Computers

watch-live-sports-shspSouth Orange, NJ, November 21, 2016 The Seton Hall Sports Poll looked at the viewing habits of fans – of all sports – and found that 22% said they watched less live sports on TV than in the past; 13% said they are watching more, and 60% about the same.

Of interest within those results, 17% said they sometimes watched on a computer; 19% said they sometimes watched on a mobile device (like a phone or a tablet), and 83% said they watched on a traditional television set.

These were the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted last week among 913 randomly called adult Americans, on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

As an area of growth, viewing on a mobile device has the greatest increase. Of those watching on a mobile device, 28% are watching more, 15% less, and 55% about the same. Of those watching on a computer, 25% are watching more, 23% less, and 50% about the same. Of those responding “yes” to television sets, 16% are watching more, 20% less, and 63% about the same.

“Television remains by far the biggest aggregator for sports fans,” said Gentile. “But nearly 20% of fans do some of their viewing in other ways. We will regularly be tracking these trends.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu;
Office Phone: 973-378-9845
Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results:

  1. How do you watch live sports? On television?
  2. Yes 83%
  3. No 17

 

  1. On a mobile device (tablet or phone)?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 81

 

  1. On a computer?
  2. Yes 17
  3. No 83

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 18
  3. Closely 30
  4. Not closely 35
  5. Not at all 18

 

National Anthem Protest a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans; Nearly 20% Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

Stillman/Sharkey Logo

National Anthem Protest is a ‘Turn Off’ for NFL Fans, Cited as the Leading Cause for Viewership Falloff

*****

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

South Orange, NJ, November 21, 2016 – In a year of declining television viewership for NFL games, 23% of Americans say they are watching fewer games, and a quarter of them attribute it to the protests during the playing of the national anthem.

These were the findings of the latest Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted last week among 913 randomly called adult Americans, on both landlines and cellphones. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Of those watching fewer games, the fall off was attributed to:

Protests during the national anthem   25%

Too many commercial interruptions    10%

Match-ups aren’t as good                       10%

Too many games on TV                             8%

More interest in the election                    3%

Other (or don’t know)                               44%

“The anthem protest still seems to resonate most loudly but there clearly are a number of issues negatively affecting viewership,” said Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.  “We saw last week that the best remedy is great match ups and great games”

As for San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who began the protests, 50% disapprove of his not choosing to vote in this month’s election, with only 14% approving. Among African-Americans, only 30% voiced disapproval, compared to 58% of white respondents.

Nearly 20% Occasionally Watch Games on Mobile Devices or Computers

watch-live-sports-shspThe poll also tracked viewing habits of fans – of all sports – and found that 22% watched less live sports on TV than in the past; 13% are watching more, and 60% about the same.

Specifically, 17% said they sometimes watched on a computer; 19% said they sometimes watched on a mobile device (like a phone or a tablet), and 83% said they watched on a traditional television set.

As an area of growth, viewing on a mobile device has the greatest increase. Of those watching on a mobile device, 28% are watching more, 15% less, and 55% about the same. Of those watching on a computer, 25% are watching more, 23% less, and 50% about the same. Of those responding “yes” to television sets, 16% are watching more, 20% less, and 63% about the same.

“Television remains by far the biggest aggregator for sports fans,” said Gentile. “But nearly 20% of fans do some of their viewing in other ways. We will regularly be tracking these trends.”

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu;
Office Phone: 973-378-9845
Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results:

 

  1. Do you find yourself watching more NFL games, fewer NFL games or about the same amount of NFL games?
  2. More 10
  3. Fewer 23
  4. About the same 58
  5. Don’t know 9

(IF “FEWER” ASK THE FOLLOWING QUESTION. IF MORE OR SAME SKIP NEXT

QUESTION)

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

  1. Do you watch more live sports on TV than in the past, less live sports on TV or about the same amount as in the past?
  2. More 13
  3. Less                                     22
  4. About the same 60
  5. Don’t know 5

 

  1. How do you watch live sports? On television?
  2. Yes 83
  3. No 17

 

  1. On a mobile device (tablet or phone)?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 81

 

  1. On a computer?
  2. Yes 17
  3. No 83

 

  1. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?
  2. Very closely 18
  3. Closely 30
  4. Not closely 35
  5. Not at all 18

 

Seton Hall Sports Poll Reveals Nation Sides with Obama’s Caution on Sons Playing Football vs. Trump’s Feeling that ‘Head on Tackles are Incredible to Watch’

Fans Who Say they Watch Less Football Cite National Anthem Protest as Principal Reason

South Orange, NJ, November 17, 2016 — This week’s Seton Hall Sports Poll, asked Americans how they felt about the concussion/head injury issue in football.

People were asked if they most agreed with President Obama’s feelings about having to think twice about letting a son play football, or President-elect Trump’s statement that head-on-tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. 59% agreed with the Obama position while only 23% agreed with the Trump statement.

By gender, women agreed with Obama over Trump by 66%-17%, and men agreed with Obama by 52%-29%.

“That is a decisive margin, and belies the embrace the nation’s voters show for Trump’s generally tough stances,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

The results came from the poll conducted this week among 913 landline and cellphone adult users across the US. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.3%.

Meanwhile, the poll asked respondents if they were watching less football, and if so, asked for reasons. 25% cited the protests during the national anthem, 10% said the match-ups aren’t as good, 10% cited too many commercial interruptions, 8% said “too many games on TV,” and 3% said “more interested in election.” 44% indicated either another choice (unnamed) or no opinion.

As for Colin Kaepernick, the San Francisco quarterback who triggered the national anthem protests, 50% expressed disapproval over his deciding not to vote in the presidential election, with only 14% showing approval. Only 30% of African-Americans disapproved compared to 58% of white respondents.

By a 2-1 margin (61% to 30%), respondents citied the Trump election victory as more surprising than the Chicago Cubs world championship. The Cubs, of course, had not won in 108 years – but no American president had ever gained the presidency from a business and non-political (or wartime) background.

The poll also asked who would be a better role model, 29% said college athletes, 21% said pro athletes, and 9% said politicians. It is worth noting that 42% said “none” or “don’t know” without those selections being offered by pollsters.

GOOD NEWS FOR MLB – SERIES MADE ONE IN FIVE AMERICANS

INTERESTED IN FOLLOWING BASEBALL MORE AVIDLY

There was good news for Major League Baseball amongst the findings – 19% the country said that the Cubs victory made them more interested in following baseball.

“For any sports league to have a single event that might turn that many people into more avid fans is a remarkable achievement,” said Gentile.  “At first glance, one might say, ‘well, it’s only 19%’, but in raw numbers – a fifth of the population is a tremendous number for MLB.”

Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

 

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone November 14-16 among 913 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall Associate Director of Media Relations, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu
Office Phone: 973-378-9845

Cell Phone: 862-520-9639

 

The results

 

  1. Whom do you think make better role models, politicians, professional athletes or collegiate athletes?
  2. Politicians 9%
  3. Pro athletes 21
  4. College athletes 29
  5. None 35
  6. Don’t know 7

 

  1. Which event would you say surprised you the most, the Chicago Cubs winning the World Series or Donald Trump winning the presidential election?
  2. Cubs 30
  3. Trump 61
  4. Neither 5
  5. Don’t know 3

 

  1. Has the Cubs’ victory in the World Series made you more interested in following baseball?
  2. Yes 19
  3. No 77
  4. Don’t know 4

 

  1. President Obama has said if he had a son he would have to think twice about letting him play football because of potential head injuries. President-elect Trump has said head-on tackles in the NFL are incredible to watch and the league has gone too soft on the issue of head injuries. Which position do you most agree with?
  2. Obama 59
  3. Trump 23
  4. Neither 10
  5. Don’t know 8

 

  1. Why have you watched fewer NFL games? Please pick your main reason from the following.
  2. Match-ups aren’t as good 10
  3. Too many games on TV 8
  4. More interested in the election 3
  5. Too many commercial interruptions 10
  6. The protests during the national anthem 25
  7. Other 37
  8. Don’t know  7

 

  1. Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who sparked the national anthem protests, refused to vote in the recent Presidential Election, also in protest. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion about this decision?
  2. Approve 14
  3. Disapprove 50
  4. No Opinion 36

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Poll Cited by Media Across the Country

Sports PollThe Seton Hall Sports Poll was cited by media across the country, including Forbes, ESPN, USA Today, CNBC, The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, CBS, ABC, MSN, Breitbart, NY Daily News, Yahoo Sports, The Sporting News, UK’s Daily Mail, Star Ledger, Miami Herald, Arizona Republic, San Francisco Chronicle and radio stations all throughout the land. In addition, Benjamin Watson, an NFL player for the Baltimore Ravens, cited to the poll in an article he wrote on SportsBlog.

On ESPN, in addition to a print piece written by sports business analyst Darren Rovell, the Poll’s results were featured on the TV shows “First Take” and “Outside the Lines.”

Sports PollThe most recent Sports Poll asked the public questions on the declining viewership of NFL games, the potential for “rigging” various sporting events and the presidential election, and what they thought about “locker room talk.”

Media highlights include:

USA Today, Poll: About 50% of Americans Believe Sports, Presidential Election Could Be Rigged

Forbes, “Will Fans Tune Back In To The NFL After The Presidential Election?” 

CBS, “Poll: NFL Ratings Down Due To National Anthem Protests”

CNBC, “There Are a Lot of Reasons for the NFL’s Ratings Slide”

ESPN, “Anthem Protests Part of Problem with NFL Ratings”

New York Times, “TV Viewership Falls in N.F.L. and Premier League: A Blip, or Something Worse?”

The Sporting News, “Is Donald Trump Right about Colin Kaepernick and NFL TV Ratings?”

Miami Herald, “NFL’s declining TV ratings a needed slap in face for sport that has itself to blame”

Yahoo Sports, “NFL Viewership is Down, but not for Some of the Reasons you Might Think”

Breitbart, “Miami Dolphins Kneeler Doesn’t Think NFL Ratings Dip Connected to Anthem Protest”

Breitbart, “Fans Agree: NFL Ratings Fall Due to Anti-American National Anthem Protests”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Twitter Woes; Anthem Protests and Assorted Backlashes” 

Legal Sports Report, “Poll: Nearly Half of Americans Think Sporting Events can Be Rigged”

ABC, “Poll Finds Anthem Protests Hurting NFL Ratings”

NY Daily News, “NFL’s declining ratings could be due to these three factors: poll”

Sports Illustrated, “About 50% of Americans Believe Sports could Be Rigged”

The Arizona Republic, “California conservatives to observe polling stations” 

Daily Mail, “National anthem protests have caused NFL ratings to drop by 12 per cent”

SportsBlog (article from Benjamin Watson, NFL player, Baltimore Ravens), “More than just National Anthem Protests for NFL Players, Teams”

MSN, “Poll: About 50% of Americans believe sports, presidential election could be rigged”

Star Ledger, “People Think Presidential Election, Sports Games could be Rigged, Poll Finds”

NJ 101.5 “Rigged?!? About half of Americans thinks pretty much EVERYTHING might be fixed”

Director of Seton Hall’s Sport Management Program, Charles Grantham, Featured in The Undefeated

charles-granthamDrawing on his experience as the former executive director of the NBA Players Association, Associate Professor Charles Grantham was featured in The Undefeated detailing a five point plan for athletes, team owners and league officials to help effectuate social justice.

The article is entitled, “Economic and social justice: What can players and leagues really do?

Issuing what he refers to as “a challenge to the nation’s comfortable silence,” Professor Grantham writes:

As done in the past on drug addiction and HIV/AIDS, the players and owners need to engage in a “principled negotiation,” one rooted in collaboration that stresses mutual issues, rather than the positions of the parties. For example, as the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) negotiate an extension to their current collective bargaining agreement (CBA), a path forward by the players and owners could begin by agreeing to take a small amount of their shared revenue (perhaps one-half of 1 percent) to create a fund to use sports as a tool to address the inferior education of inner-city schools and the deteriorating relationship between young black men and law enforcement in all NBA cities.

As youth demonstrations continue to expand, any action plan must begin with them. The joint fund could be used to financially support basketball in the public school systems, grades 5-12 in the NBA’s 30 cities, freeing school funds to be redirected to academic programs. The action plan would require the mayor, police chief and school superintendents’ cooperation to receive the funds. It could use appearances by current and retired NBA players with law enforcement officers to create and inspire improved relationships in the communities. This can also be achieved by the NFL/NFL Players Association (NFLPA), despite their poor labor/management relationship. The leagues’ political lobby could aid the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) and the NAACP should they pursue an amendment to the Civil Rights Act, in order to allow the Justice Department prosecutorial authority in the most egregious instances of officer-involved shootings.

Read more of “Economic and social justice: What can players and leagues really do?

 

Roughly Half Say Sports Events and Presidential Election Could Be ‘Rigged’

South Orange, NJ, October 31, 2016 – With the word “rigged” being thrown about in this election season, the Seton Hall Sports Poll asked Americans if they felt that sports contests and the upcoming presidential election “could be rigged by outside influences.”

A majority, though in some cases slim, said “yes, they could be rigged.”

sports-poll-10-31-16-riggedThe results: 52% said “yes” that an NFL game “could be rigged by outside influences” with 42% saying “no.” For an NBA game, 51% said yes; 42% no.

For college sports the margins were closer: for a college football game, it was 47% yes, 46% no, and for a college basketball game, it was 46% yes, 45% no.

Of all the questions asked, only baseball’s World Series, taking place as the poll was conducted, had a majority that believed its games could not be “fixed,” with only 42% saying “yes” and 51% saying “no.”

And pointedly, 47% of Americans said “yes” a presidential election “could be rigged by outside influences,” while 46% said “no”.

In each case, between 7-9% said they did not know.

The poll was conducted last week – October 24-26 – among 841 adults (landline and cellphone) with a margin of error of +/- 3.4%.

Asked whether the presidential election “could be rigged,” 47% said yes, and there is a great deal of overlap in the people that believe in rigging – of that 47%, some two-thirds said yes, the NFL or NBA could be rigged, and somewhat fewer – 57% – said the World Series could be rigged.

“The sports organizing bodies rely heavily on the public believing that their games are honest,” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “This measurement of public perception certainly can’t please them, just as people in government are so upset about Donald Trump’s charges.”

The poll also asked whether some teams having ownership positions with fantasy sports companies opens the door for the rigging of performances of professional athletes to affect the daily fantasy outcomes.  45% said yes, 32% said no, with 24% stating “don’t know.”

Rick Gentile was interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings, which can be heard at https://t.co/jShJhGXMWi

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 24-26 among 841 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University, michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

NFL TV Ratings Down; Fans Cite a Host of Factors, Led by National Anthem Protests

Seven Possible Reasons for Flagging NFL Ratings Resonate with the Public

South Orange, NJ, October 27, 2016 — Viewership for NFL games is down approximately 12% this season, sending league and club officials in search of reasons. A Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week asked people to identify factors accounting for the drop.

Each question was asked separately, allowing for a yes, no or don’t know response.   Thus, respondents could weigh in on each of the seven possibilities as a contributing factor without identifying one single factor.

The leading factor – the one receiving the most “yesses” – was players not standing for the national anthem. However, the seven factors all evoked a large number of yes responses, so that even the least chosen, at 33%, represents a lot of fans.

56% of respondents cited players not standing for the anthem, with 50% citing the distraction of the presidential campaign and 47% the controversy over the handling of domestic violence cases involving players.

On the question of domestic violence, men and women responded equally; 47% of men cited that as a possible reason, 46% of women said yes to that possibility.

Other factors included games on too many days, over-saturating the market (44%), increased interest in post-season baseball (39%), the ongoing controversy over head injuries (33%) and a decline in quality of play on the field (33%).

A total of 841 adults across the US (on landlines and cellphones) participated in the poll, which has a margin of error of +/- 3.4%. The poll was conducted October 24-26.

“Only a third cited quality of play and head injuries,” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “Perhaps the league can take some solace in that, although a third is still a lot of people. But it is somewhat remarkable that the impact of the national anthem protest seems to hold, given that the action occurs pre-game and isn’t even televised.”

Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

 

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone October 24-26 among 841 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations, AppelPR@gmail.com
or Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall University,
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

Sports Poll featured by CBS Sports, Sports Illustrated, ESPN and the Sporting News

The Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted by the Sharkey Institute and sponsored by the Stillman
School of Business, was featured in articles by CBS Sports, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, the Sporting
News and Yahoo Sports.
This most recent poll queried the public on their feelings about Colin Kaepernick’s protest against police violence— staged during the playing of the national anthem at football games; the endorsement power of the NBA’s LeBron James vs. Steph Curry; the relative endorsement value of NFL stars Peyton Manning (31%), Tom Brady (21%), Aaron Rodgers (17%), Cam Newton (16%), JJ Watt (15%) and Odell Beckham Jr. (13%); and the public’s opinion on the NCAA’s decision to pull their national tournaments out of North Carolina for what it deemed to be the state’s anti-LGBT laws (33% support NCAA decision, 28% oppose, 39% had no opinion).Articles featuring the Poll’s most recent results include:CBS Sports: “POLL: Almost half of Americans disagree with Colin Kaepernick’s method of protest

CBS Sports: “Seahawks’ Michael Bennett says it’s time for ‘a white guy to join’ protests

Sports Illustrated: “Poll: Americans disagree with Colin Kaepernick protest

KCNTV, CBS Denver; Wisconsin Star; Pennsylvania Sun: “Kaepernick’s Protest Makes Cover of Time Magazine

Yahoo Sports: “Poll: Americans disagree with Kaepernick protest

Sporting News: “Whitlock logic: Move Panthers game now that NFL games have turned into protest stage

ESPN, Darren Rovell on Twitter: “Seton Hall National Sports Poll: 47% disapprove of Kaepernick not standing during Anthem, but 80% support his right to protest.”

New Poll: By over 2 to 1, USA Believes NFL not Honest in Recent Years on Subject of Head Injuries

BY OVER 2 TO 1, USA BELIEVES NFL HAS NOT BEEN HONEST IN RECENT YEARS ON THE SUBJECT OF HEAD INJURIES

29% VIEW LEAGUE LESS FAVORABLY

*******

   Both men and women agree –

73% Say Women’s soccer team pay should equal men’s

South Orange, NJ, April 15, 2016 — By more than a 2 to 1 margin, the nation believes theNational Football League has not been honest in recent years on the subject of head injuries, according to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week. While 26% believe the league has been honest, 58% feels it has not been. 16% said they did not know.

The poll was conducted among 730 adults on both landlines and cellphones across the nation. (There is a margin of error of +/- 3.7%).

29% – nearly a third – now view the NFL less favorably, with 56% saying the matter has had no effect on their feelings about the league. (7% see it more favorably).

“Even though an overwhelming margin feels the league has been less than honest on this issue, the NFL continues to enjoy great popularity, with a majority of the respondents still saying it has no effect on how they view the league,” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “But the 29% who view the league less favorably is a substantial number.”

51% feel the NFL is not doing enough to protect its players from concussions and head injuries (vs. 35% who feel they do), and 54% feel they do not do enough for retired players who suffer from brain injuries (vs. 22% who feel they do). These “not doing enough” numbers are up 10% for both active and retired players since the question was last asked, in October 2014, by the Poll.

49% feel the sudden retirement of the New York Jets lineman D’Brickashaw Ferguson will raise awareness of the subject of head injuries.   And a whopping 80% feel that greater precautions should be taken by high school and college programs to limit concussions.

When asked “If your son wanted to play football…..” only 21% said they would enthusiastically encourage it, 56% said they would cautiously allow it, and 18% said they would absolutely forbid it. Among men, it was 30% (encourage), 49% (allow), 18% (forbid), while among women, it was 13% (encourage), 62% (allow), and 19% (forbid).

MEN SUPPORT EQUAL PAY FOR WOMEN’S SOCCER PLAYERS
ALMOST AS MUCH AS WOMEN DO, AND BOTH OVERWHELMINGLY SO

While a national dialogue on the matter of equal pay for women plays out on the Presidential campaign trail, on the matter of members of the US Women’s Soccer team (World Cup champions), receiving comparable pay to members of the Men’s team, 73% indicated they should receive the same pay, with an additional 11% saying they should receive more. Only 8% said they should receive less, as they currently do. Men strongly support equal pay, with 69% of them approving, while 76% of women concur.

NBA WANTS TO RAISE MINIMUM AGE FROM 19 TO 20 – MAJORITY AGREES

With the NBA Commissioner saying he would like to raise the minimum age to draft players from 19 to 20, this effectively meant college players would have to complete two years, not one. 55% of respondents agreed with the two years of college plan, with only 13% supporting one year. The Poll asked this question in March, 2014, at which time 54% supported two years, and 19% supported one and done.

SALARIES FOR COLLEGE ATHLETES? 24% SAY THEY WOULD LOSE INTEREST

The Poll asked if interest would change if college athletes were compensated, and 64% said their interest would remain the same, with 24% saying it would decrease and only 11% saying it would increase.

COLLEGE HOCKEY GROWTH? 44% EXPRESS INTEREST

Asked if they would be be interested in seeing a further growth of hockey on the college level, 44% indicated they would be either somewhat interested (28%) or very interested (16%), with 51% saying they were not interested in that.

ENDORSEMENTS BY PGA GOLFERS AN INFLUENCE?

Asked how likely they would be to buy a product endorsed by some leading PGA professionals, Phil Mickelson’s 24% “likely” rated highest among the five players listed, with Tiger Woods receiving 21%, Rory McIlroy 19%, Jordan Spieth 17% and Master’s winner Danny Willett 9%. The “not likely” tally came in at 62% for Woods, 61% for Willett, 56% for Spieth, 55% for Mickelson and 54% for McIlroy. Mickelson also scored highest (46%) among those identifying themselves as fans or players of golf (38.5% of all polled).

Buying Products Endorsed by Golf Stars

 

Results           Likely      Unlikely         Golf Fans Likely       Golf Fans Unlikely

 

Mickelson       24%            55                         46                                40

Woods             21               62                         35                                52

McIlroy            19                54                        38                                44

Spieth              17               55                         35                                47

Willett              9                  61                         17                                58
Rick Gentile will be interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings. Links will follow upon completion.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone April 11-13 among 730 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.7 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

The results

  1. An NFL Executive Vice President has suggested that there is a link between football and severe brain injury. Do you think the league has been honest about this link in dealing with the subject of head injuries for the past few years?

Yes 26

No 58

Don’t know 16

 

Has the league’s handling of the controversy concerning brain injuries made you feel more favorable to the NFL, less favorable to the NFL or has it not affected your view of the league?

More favorable 7

Less favorable 29

No effect 56

Don’t know 8

 

  1. Do you think the NFL is doing enough to protect its players from concussions and head injuries?

Yes 35

No 51

Don’t know 15

 

  1. Do you think the NFL has done enough for retired players who suffer from brain injuries after sustaining concussions during their playing days?

Yes 22

No 54

Don’t know 24

 

  1. NY Jets offensive lineman D’Brickashaw Ferguson just announced his retirement after never missing a game for his entire 10-year career. He had stated that he was troubled by the NFL’s downplaying the long-term effects of concussions.

Do you think his retirement will raise awareness of the subject of head injuries or not have any effect on awareness?

Raise awareness 49

Have no effect 36

Don’t know 15

 

  1. Do you think greater precautions should be taken by high school and college football organizations to limit the number of concussions by student/athletes, or is enough being done?

Greater precautions 80

Enough being done 13

Don’t know 8

 

If your son wanted to play football would you enthusiastically encourage it, cautiously allow it or absolutely forbid it?

Enthusiastically encourage 21

Cautiously allow    56

Absolutely forbid 18

Don’t know      6

  1. The Commissioner of the NBA has said he wants to raise the minimum age for eligibility to the NBA draft from 19 to 20. In effect, this means players would have to finish two years of college before becoming eligible instead of one year as it is now. Do you think they should leave the rule as it is now at one year, change to two years, or have no limits for when a player can be drafted?

One year 13

Two years 55

No limits 19

Don’t know 11

 

If collegiate athletes begin to receive salaries would your interest in following college athletics increase, decrease or remain the same?

Increase 11

Decrease 24

Remain the same 64

 

  1. Collegiate hockey has seen more participation recently. How interested would you be in seeing further growth of hockey on the collegiate level, very interested, somewhat interested or not at all interested?

Very interested 16

Somewhat interested 28

Not interested 51

Don’t know 6

 

Members of the US Women’s Soccer team have filed suit against USA Soccer because despite winning the Women’s World Cup they received about one quarter of what the men, who finished 15th, received. Do you think the women should receive more than the men, the same as the men or less than the men?

More 11

Same 73

Less 8

Don’t know 9

 

  1. Do you either play golf, follow golf or watch golf broadcasts?

Yes 39

No 57

Don’t know 4

 

  1. How likely would you be to buy a product endorsed by the following players:

 

Jordan Spieth

Likely 17

Not likely 56

Don’t know 27

 

Rory McIlroy

Likely 19

Not likely 54

Don’t know 28

 

Phil Mickelson

Likely 24

Not likely 55

Don’t know 22

 

Danny Willett

Likely 9

Not likely 61

Don’t know 30

 

Tiger Woods

Likely 21

Not likely 62

Don’t know 17

 

14. How closely would you say you follow sports, very closely, closely, not closely or not at all?

Very closely 19

Closely 41

Not closely 28

Not at all 13