Tag Archives: College Sports

Nat’l Poll: 80% of Americans Support Legalized Sports Betting

80% of Americans Support Legalized Sports Betting
And Disagree with Loophole Excluding “Home State” College Teams

South Orange, NJ, October 10, 2019 — Americans have embraced legalized betting on sports, bolstered by a Supreme Court ruling that okayed a state-by-state determination.

Fifty-five percent of the public supports the state-by-state process, with an additional 25 percent saying it should be legal in all states. The breakdown by age was dramatic for those saying it should be legal in all states, with 37 percent of ages 18-29 saying yes, but only 14 percent of those 60 and over agreeing.

The 55 percent approval of state-by-state marks a significant leap in less than a year, when a November 2018 Seton Hall Sports Poll found that only 40 percent of the nation felt it should be left to the individual states.

The combined “state-by-state” and the “legal in all states” adds up to an 80% approval for legalized sports betting.  Only 16 percent say it should not be legal.  In February 2017, only 46 percent of respondents said that betting on sports should be allowed (without including a differentiation between state-by-state and national).

The findings appear in a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted last week among 714 adult Americans on both landlines and mobile phones.  The poll has a +/-3.8 percent margin of error.
Continue reading

American Public Supports College Athletes Receiving Endorsement Money for ‘Image and Likeness,’ as Approved in California this Week

American Public Supports College Athletes Receiving ‘Image and Likeness’ Endorsement Money, as Approved in California this Week

But Feels NCAA, not States, Should Oversee the Process 

South Orange NJ, October 3, 2019  — The American public, by an almost 2-1 margin, believes that student athletes should be allowed to profit from the use of their name, likeness or image such as in the endorsement of a product.

Such was the finding of a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week, where 60% endorsed the idea with 32% rejecting it.  Eight percent said they did not know, or had no opinion.

The Poll was conducted among 714 adult Americans across the country, either on landline or cellphone.  The poll has a margin of error of +/- 3.8 percent.

The timing of the Poll coincided with California Governor Gavin Newsom signing a bill that allows college athletes to hire agents and earn endorsement money.
Continue reading

Nearly 40 Percent of NCAA Tournament Viewers Will Watch Online; Twenty-two Percent of Those Who Watch Will Do so at Work

South Orange NJ, March 21, 2019 – As Americans increasingly turn to online devices to follow news and sports, a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week reveals that 38 percent of those who will be watching the NCAA Men’s basketball tournament will do so either entirely or partially online.

The poll was asked of 606 adult Americans on both landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of +/- 4.1%.

Of the men’s tournament, 38 percent of all Americans said they would be watching at least part of the coverage. Split by gender, 49 percent of men said they would be watching the tournament, and 29 percent of women said they would be watching.

Twenty-two percent of all respondents who will be watching also said they will watch the tournament while at work; among males that number rises to 29 percent.
Continue reading

Many Think Settlement with Kaepernick is Admission of Collusion by NFL

Many Think Settlement with Kaepernick is Admission of Collusion by NFL

45 percent of those polled across the nation said they believed the settlement with Colin Kaepernick was an admission of collusion by the NFL.

By 3-to-1, public thinks Kaepernick’s chance of a new contract in the NFL has now decreased.

South Orange NJ, March 4, 2019 – In a national poll, 45 percent of the public said that they believe the confidential settlement of Colin Kaepernick’s lawsuit against the NFL for collusion was essentially an admission of guilt on the part of the NFL. On the other side, 40 said it was not an admission. Of those polled, 15 percent said they did not know or had no opinion.

White people were evenly divided on whether the settlement amounted to an admission of collusion by the NFL, but African-Americans said they believe it is by a 3 to 1 margin.

Kaepernick is credited with beginning the “anthem protests” in the NFL which drew ire and even boycotts from many football fans as well as President Trump. Although a past poll had shown 32 percent of Americans supported Kaepernick’s protests, which were intended to draw attention to racism in America, roughly 44 percent disapproved, with the rest (24 percent) either having no opinion or not knowing.

In the same poll (September 28, 2017), when asked whether or not NFL players should be ordered to stand for the national anthem or be fired from the team as President Trump had suggested, only 18 percent responded “yes.”

Kaepernick became a free agent in early 2017 and was not hired by any NFL team. He brought suit against the NFL for collusion in keeping him out of the league. He was not hired for the 2018 season either.
Continue reading

Did Zion’s Sneaker Explosion Hurt the Nike Brand? Nearly One in Five Say ‘Yes’

Did Zion’s Sneaker Explosion Hurt the Nike Brand? Nearly One in Five Say ‘Yes’

Majority feels student athletes should be compensated by sneaker companies for wearing their brands; less support for them receiving pay for playing revenue producing sports

South Orange NJ, March 1, 2019 — It was the sneaker explosion heard round the world, when Duke’s Zion Williamson’s Nike went poof last week in a game against North Carolina. Did all the publicity hurt the Nike brand?

According to a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week, nearly 1-in-5 respondents said it was the indicator of the quality of the brand. More than two thirds, 67%, felt it was a one-time fluke.

“That’s a good percentage favoring the one-time mishap,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by the Sharkey Institute within the Stillman School of Business. “But 18% (those who felt it represented the brand’s quality), is not a small number. Nike has some rebuilding work ahead – of its image, not just its sneakers.”

These were the findings of a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week, with questions asked of 794 adult Americans on landlines and cellphones, with a margin of error of +/- 3.5%.

Compensation for Student Athletes

Meanwhile, a majority of Americans believe that student athletes should be compensated by sneaker companies for the use of their brands in collegiate athletics if they are required to wear the brand, and that students in revenue producing sports – like football and basketball – should receive compensation on top of scholarships and cost of attendance stipends.

On the question of financial compensation for student athletes from sneaker companies – like Nike and Adidas – , the public says “yes” by a margin of 57-36%.

On the question of compensation for participation in revenue generating sports, the margin was closer, with 49% saying “yes” and 46% saying “no.” And while white respondents are in favor of “sneaker compensation” by a 54-41% margin, African-Americans are in favor by 3-1.
Continue reading

Poll: 70 Percent More Likely to Watch Game If They Wager on It

As leagues move towards embrace of gambling, 70% say they’re more likely to watch a game if they wager, but 61% say it will lead to cheating or fixed games.

South Orange, NJ, November 30, 2018 — If you bet that wagering on a game leads to greater viewership – you’d be right. A survey by the Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that 70% of Americans say they would be more likely to watch a game they bet on.

In a week in which Major League Baseball announced a marketing partnership with MGM Resorts, the era of “No Betting Permitted” signs at ballparks is over, and the fans seem to love it.

But it is a double edge sword – 61% say they believe that legal betting on sports events leads to cheating or the fixing of games.

But oh that 70% of heightened interested in watching games is music to a sports league’s ears. Within that, the poll found that 88% of those age 18-29, the coveted demographic loved by sponsors and hardest to reach – would be more likely to watch if they placed a bet.

Continue reading

Roughly Half the Nation Feels Legalized Sports Betting Calls Integrity of Games into Question

South Orange, NJ, May 16, 2018 — Concern over the integrity of sports results has gone hand in hand with the question of legalized gambling over the years, and Monday’s Supreme Court ruling, which ended the federal ban on sports wagering, has intensified the discussion even further.

The most recent Seton Hall Sports Poll (conducted April 23-25 among 736 adults in the U.S. with a +/- 3.7% margin of error), found that 48% feel legalized sports betting would negatively impact the integrity of sporting events.

This was consistent with a poll taken by the SHSP in 2014, when 49% answered affirmatively to the same question. When the question was posed in 2012, 53% said the sports integrity would be negatively impacted.

“People tend to be in favor of gambling on games, but a large number – nearly half the population, believes the outcome of games could be subject to questioning,” noted Rick Gentile, director of the poll, which is sponsored by the Stillman School of Business and its Sharkey Institute. “ Whether the games are fixed or not isn’t the question so much as whether public confidence is eroded. That’s a big problem for sports leagues.”

The Official Seton Hall Sports Poll podcast discussing this topic with Seth Everett and Rick Gentile can be found at https://itunes.apple.com/mt/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467.

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone April 23-25 among 736 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute, with cell phone interviewing provided by Braun Research.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.7 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel, AppelPR@gmail.com;
Michael Ricciardelli, Associate Director of Media Relations, Seton Hall
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu, 908-447-3034

The results of Seton Hall’s April poll:

  1. Would you be in favor of legalized betting on sports events?

Yes       55%

No       35

Don’t know/No opinion       10

(IF NO TO ABOVE SKIP TO QUESTION 3)

Would you be in favor of betting on just professional events or should betting on collegiate events be legal as well?

Just professional       36

Both professional and collegiate       49

Don’t know/No opinion       15

  1. Do you think legalized sports betting would negatively impact the integrity of sporting events?

Yes       48

No       42

Don’t know/No opinion       10

 

  1. The US Supreme Court is about to rule on whether states should be allowed to legalize betting on sports events or whether it should be up to the federal government to decide. Do you think sports betting should be under state control or federal control?

State control       62

Federal control       27

Don’t know/No opinion       12

 

Fifty-three Percent Say TV Revenue in NCAA Tournament Detracts from Academic Goals of a University

Two Years of College vs One?
41% Favor Raising the Age Limit for NBA Eligibility;

Number who Say ‘Scholarship is Sufficient’ for Student-Athlete Compensation Trending Down

 South Orange, NJ, March 23, 2017 — A clear majority of the American public believes that television revenue generated by the NCAA Basketball Tournament has turned collegiate athletics into too big a business, detracting from a university’s academic goals.

Fifty-three percent (53%) responded “yes” to that question in a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted this week among 739 adults across the country.  Thirty-five percent (35%) responded “no.”  The poll has a +/- 3.7% margin of error and is conducted with both landline and cellphone users.  The poll is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute.

When asked, however, how much importance universities place on graduating basketball players – 58% said they believed the schools placed either a high or medium importance on graduation.  This is about even (59%) from a similar Seton Hall Sports Poll taken five years ago.

Both the NBA Commissioner and the president of the NCAA have suggested raising the minimum age for eligibility in the NBA draft from 19 to 20.  That essentially raises the commitment to college basketball from one year to two years.  19% thought it should remain at one year, but 41% favored two years.  26% said there should be no limits.  When asked this question two years ago, 12% favored one year, and 56% two years with 23% saying no limits.

63% felt requiring an extra year of eligibility in college was a good thing, even if it meant losing a year of professional salary.  26% said no to the extra year requirement.  When asked this question in 2014, 73% favored staying in school, a significant drop.

NUMBER WHO SAY ‘SCHOLARSHIP IS SUFFICIENT’ IS TRENDING DOWN

“Yes” Responses, 2012, 2013, 2017

45% of the nation felt student/athletes should not share in TV revenue or receive a salary for participating, with 40% saying they are exploited by not sharing in the revenue and should receive compensation.   Men are more likely than women to believe that the students are being exploited, and people 18-44 are much more likely to believe that the students are exploited than those over 45.

60% felt providing a scholarship was sufficient for athletes, whereas 69% (2012) and 71% (2013) in previous Seton Hall Sports Polls felt providing a scholarship was sufficient.  35% believe the athletes should receive some form of salary or salary/scholarship.

“The public seems to be more sympathetic to increasing fees to student/athletes above scholarship,” noted Rick Gentile, Director of the Poll.  “This is in sync with major conferences beginning to offer additional ‘cost of attendance’ aid to student/athletes.”

On the matter of whether people fill out a set of brackets or participate in a poll over this year’s tournament, 13% said they did.  35% of the nation says they follow the tournament either closely or very closely.

Interest in the tournament vs. the NBA playoffs is virtually even, with 30% saying they are more interested in the NCAA and 29% the NBA.  But when asked the same question in 2014, 39% said the NCAA and only 22% said the NBA.  In 2011, 44% said NCAA and 29% said NBA.

46% of respondents felt that most (or all) colleges break the rules in recruiting athletes, the same number as when the question was asked in 2013.

Asked who makes better role models and given a choice of five options, 52% said teachers, 17% said coaches, 9% said college athletes, 9% said pro athletes, and 3% said politicians.

A podcast in which Seth Everett interviews Rick Gentile can be downloaded at https://t.co/iRcZH6RBTQ

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone March 20-22 among 739 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations AppelPR@gmail.com;
Seton Hall University Associate Director of Media Relations, Michael Ricciardelli
michael.ricciardelli@shu.edu; 908-447-3034

 

 

The results:

 

  1. The commissioner of the NBA and the president of the NCAA have suggested raising the minimum age for eligibility to the NBA draft from 19 to 20. In effect this means players would have to attend two years of college instead of one year as it is now. Do you think the rule should be left as it is now at one year, change to two years, or have no limits for when a player can be drafted?

One year  19%

Two years 41

No limits   25

Don’t know 15

 

  1. Do you think requiring another year of school for student/athletes is a good thing for them even though they could lose a year of pro salary?

Yes 63

No 26

Don’t know 11

  1. Do you think student/athletes who participate in revenue generating sports should receive a salary from their school, a salary plus scholarship or do you think a scholarship is enough compensation?

Salary   6

Salary plus scholarship 29

Scholarship 60

Don’t know   5

  1. Which of the following statements do you most agree with:

 

  1. Student/athletes are given a great opportunity to be able to participate in the NCAA Tournament and should not share in TV revenue or receive a salary for their participation.                                                                                        45
  1. Student/athletes are exploited by the NCAA Tournament because they don’t share in the TV revenue and should receive a salary for their participation        40

Neither (DON’T READ)   3

Both (DON’T READ)   2

Don’t know                                                                                     11

 

  1. How closely have you been following this year’s NCAA Tournament, very closely, closely,

not closely or not at all?

Very closely 13

Closely 21

Not closely 30

Not at all 36

  1. Did you fill out a set of brackets or participate in a pool involving money for this year’s tournament?

Yes 13

No 83

Refuse to answer   4

  1. Do you think the selection process to participate in the tournament is fair to all division one schools or do you think schools from the major conferences have an advantage?

Fair                         24

Major conf. have advantg. 46

Don’t know                         30

  1. Which event are you more interested in, the NCAA Tournament or the NBA playoffs or are you not interested in either?

NCAA Tournament 30

NBA Playoffs 29

Neither 34

Don’t know   7

 

  1. Do you think the television revenue generated by the NCAA Tournament has turned collegiate athletics into too big a business that detracts from a University’s academic goals?

Yes 53

No 35

Don’t know 12

  1. How much importance do you think universities place on graduating basketball players, a high importance, medium importance, little importance or no importance?

High importance 25

Medium importance 33

Little importance 21

No importance   8

Don’t know 13

  1. How many college basketball programs do you think break the rules in recruiting athletes, all of them, most of them, very few of them or none of them?

All  9

Most 37

Very few 34

None   4

Don’t know 16

  1. Do you think it hurts the game when colleges recruit athletes they know won’t stay for the full duration of their eligibility?

Yes 48

No 40

Don’t know 13

 

  1. Who do you think make better role models, college athletes, pro athletes, coaches, teachers or politicians?

College athletes   9

Pro athletes   9

Coaches 17

Teachers 52

Politicians   3

Don’t know 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seton Hall Sports Poll Finds 33% Support for NCAA Decision to Pull Events from North Carolina; 28% Disagree

Stillman/Sharkey LogoSETON HALL SPORTS POLL FINDS 33% SUPPORT FOR NCAA DECISION TO PULL EVENTS FROM NORTH CAROLINA; 28% DISAGREE

South Orange, NJ, September 23, 2016 — By a margin of 33% – 28%, Americans support the NCAA decision to pull their national tournaments out of North Carolina in the wake of what it called the state’s anti-LGBT laws.

39% had no opinion, or did not know.

The poll was conducted this week among 875 adults on both landlines and cellphones across the nation. (There is a margin of error of +/- 3.4%).

“There is no overwhelming position on this,” said Rick Gentile, director of the Poll, which is sponsored by The Sharkey Institute. “Like the issue itself, there is division, but we believe the NCAA will be buoyed by this show of support on a matter still evolving in public opinion.”

Rick Gentile was interviewed by Seth Everett for a podcast on the poll’s findings.

To stream : http://tobtr.com/9488399

To download: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seton-hall-sports-poll/id1053266467?mt=2#episodeGuid=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.blogtalkradio.com%2Fsetonhallsportspoll%2F2016%2F09%2F23%2Fseason-2-september-2016-colin-kaepernick-national-anthem-controvery

ABOUT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

One of the country’s leading Catholic universities, Seton Hall University has been a catalyst for leadership — developing students in mind, heart and spirit — since 1856. Home to nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and offering more than 90 academic programs, Seton Hall’s academic excellence has been singled out for distinction by The Princeton Review, U.S.News & World Report and Bloomberg Businessweek.

Seton Hall, which embraces students of all religions, prepares its graduates to be exemplary servant leaders and global citizens. Its attractive main campus is located in suburban South Orange, New Jersey, and is only 14 miles by train, bus or car from New York City, offering a wealth of employment, internship, cultural and entertainment opportunities. The university’s nationally recognized School of Law is prominently located in downtown Newark.

For more information, visit www.shu.edu.

About the poll:

This poll was conducted by telephone September 19-21 among 875 adults in the United States. The Seton Hall Sports Poll is conducted by the Sharkey Institute.

Phone numbers were dialed from samples of both standard landline and cell phones. The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3.4 percentage points. The error for subgroups may be higher. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been conducted regularly since 2006.

Media: Media: Marty Appel Public Relations (212) 245-1772, AppelPR@gmail.com; Rick Gentile (917) 881-9489.

The results:

The NCAA recently announced it was moving 6 collegiate championship events out of North Carolina because of what it referred to as the state’s anti-LGBT laws. Do you approve, disapprove or have no opinion on the NCAA’s stance?

Approve 33

Disapprove 28

No Opinion/Don’t know 39