Newark’s Catholic Advocate Now Digitized and Searchable

Printed and microfilm versions of the Catholic Advocate in Seton Hall University Special Collections
Printed and microfilm versions of the Catholic Advocate in Seton Hall University Special Collections

Based on research by Professor Alan Delozier

Selections from the Catholic Advocate, the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Newark, have now been digitized in a cooperative project between Seton Hall University’s Special Collections and the Catholic Research Resources Alliance (CRRA).  The newspaper has been published regularly since 1951; however, the issues selected for this digitization project were limited to the years 1958-1964, the era of the Second Vatican Council, enabling researchers to examine this period and its impact on the Newark Catholic community.  The project digitizes newspapers from around the country, enabling scholars to examine differences and similarities between regions during this period.

Screenshot of Catholic News Archives
Screenshot of Catholic News Archives

Seton Hall Special Collections and University Library staff selected the best quality images to scan and provided description of the materials to allow for the detailed searches that are now possible.  As part of the digitization process, the text was captured using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to allow for keyword searches of the entire text of each article, not just the titles.  If a word or name is mentioned anywhere in an article or even in a photograph caption, it will be found in the powerful search engine used in the portal.  However, because the contents were read by machine, interpretive errors are possible in the text.  Therefore, the public is invited to read and correct the text, and particularly active commentators are acknowledged on the website in a “Hall of Fame.”

Article text interface
Article text interface

The CRRA has digitized many more newspapers as part of its project, including the San Francisco Archdiocese’s Monitor, the Clarion Herald of New Orleans, and the Catholic Telegraph of Cincinnati, among others.  The project and the construction of the Catholic News Archive website was the recipient of a Catholic Communications Campaign grant from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Student working with online resources
Student working with online resources

The digitized materials are currently being utilized in classes at Seton Hall University.  Professor Alan Delozier, University Archivist, has introduced students to this new resource in his class “New Jersey Catholic Experience,” offered through the Department of Catholic Studies.  Students are able to use this powerful new tool to conduct in-depth research on the history of the Catholic New Jersey community.

The new portal and all of its content can be explored here; the Catholic Advocate content specifically be found here.

Trina Padilla de Sanz: A Woman Ahead of Her Time

Trina Padilla de Sanz: A Woman Ahead of Her Time
by Carly Miller, curator

Currently on display through September 20th at the Msgr. William Noé Field Archives & Special Collections Reading Room are items from the Trina Padilla de Sanz papers (Mss 0020). The exhibit showcases published works by the Puerto Rican writer, poet, composer, and social activist Trina Padilla de Sanz (1864-1957).

Portrait of La Hija del Caribe, 1956.
Portrait of La Hija del Caribe, 1956.

Writing as La Hija del Caribe, Padilla de Sanz was a prominent literary figure in the twentieth century, penning numerous articles, poems, and essays on a wide variety of topics such as history, literature, poetry, music, politics and culture. In a period when expectations for women were mostly confined to the domestic sphere, Padilla de Sanz represents an important deviation from the norm. Breaking free of society’s narrow view of a woman’s place in the world, Padilla de Sanz was an outspoken, unrelenting voice for change.
This exhibit focuses on one very prominent aspect of La Hija’s writings: her activism. She focused on progressive topics such as women’s rights, the preservation of the Puerto Rican culture and identity, and protection and compassion for those most often marginalized and ignored. La Hija’s feminism, patriotism, and drive for social justice are represented in the displayed works. From advocating for compassion on behalf of the incarcerated to calling out the United States for its aggression to highlighting women’s role in wartime, Padilla de Sanz did not shy away from controversial topics.

"Ana Roque de Duprey," a poem by Trina Padilla de Sanz. Undated.
“Ana Roque de Duprey,” a poem by Trina Padilla de Sanz. Undated.

While the exhibit represents only a small portion of her extensive writing career, it fittingly demonstrates the essence of Padilla de Sanz. Her desire to see society improve formed not only the basis of her writings but also of her life. La Hija was actively involved in community affairs so that she could encourage the type of change that she so often wrote about in newspapers and magazines. Not content to sit on the sidelines, Padilla de Sanz unabashedly ignored the societal expectation of women in the twentieth century. Instead, she carved out a diverse and fulfilling career. She was a woman ahead of her time, paving the way for future generations of women and inspiring progress and reform within society.
For more information about this exhibit or to make an appointment to view the Trina Padilla de Sanz papers, please contact 973-761-9476 or archives@shu.edu.

Sacramental Objects in the Archives

October is American Archives Month

The Archives and Special Collections Center at Seton Hall is also the repository for the Archdiocese of Newark, and as a result we have many Catholic materials and artifacts. Some of the most interesting of these objects are those used in sacramental ceremonies and rituals.

We have many examples of chalices, which are used to hold the Blood of Christ that is taken at Communion. This silver gilt chalice with gold finish was presented to Rev. Pierce McCarthy, former Vice-President and Treasurer of the College, by the students of Seton Hall College in 1870.

Silver gilt chalice ca. 1870
Silver gilt chalice ca. 1870

Ciboria are also used during Communion. A ciborium resembles a covered chalice, and is used to store the consecrated host. This ornate ciborium from the 1920s is a beautiful example of a style that has virtually disappeared from use since Vatican II, when the church began to emphasize a simpler aesthetic.

Ciborium ca. 1920s
Ciborium ca. 1920s

Sick call sets were used in the home when a priest came to give the sacraments of Penance, Holy Communion, and Extreme Unction to an ill or bedridden family member. These sets have become increasingly rare as it became less common for sick relatives to be cared for in the home. Some examples from our Archives include an elaborate set which probably dates from the late 19th or early 20th century. It consists of a beautiful wooden box which contains a candelabrum with crucifix and shell-shaped holy water font attached, two small silver plates, a silver-embellished holy water bottle, a dish for regular water, and a small silver-handled horsehair brush for anointing with holy oil.

Sick call box opened to show candelabrum with crucifix, two small silver plates, holy water bottle, and silver-handled brushSick call box

Also in the Archives is an Irish sick call set from around 1880, which was brought to the United States by a young immigrant. This set, stored in a black paperboard box with gold embellishments, contains a crucifix, two candle holders, a glass bottle for the holy water, a white linen cloth, and a spoon.

Sick call box opened to show purple lining, crucifix, two candle holders, glass holy water bottle, white linen cloth, and spoon Sick call box closed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To see even more objects from our Archdiocese of Newark collections, please visit the Religious Artifacts section of our Digital Collections page.

 

Seton Family Album Digital Photographs and Publicity

The Seton family album has been receiving a lot of attention from the Seton Hall community. Recently, the album was featured on the University’s home page in a news story, showing a selection of the images and describing the album and related resources.

The Seton family album promotional landing page.
The Seton family album promotional landing page.

The album and digital collection were also featured in a Setonian article: Hall history told through old photos, in a story written by Abbas Khan Cook.

The entire album was digitally photographed by Milan Stanic, the University photographer, with the help of the University Advancement Office. Staff of the Archives and Special Collections Center transcribed the handwritten captions on the images and made all 51 photographs available in a new digital collection, the Seton Family Photograph Album Digital Collection

The A&SCC is delighted to see this unique and fascinating album receive attention from the Seton Hall community. We hope everybody takes these opportunities to view the images and catch a glimpse of the life of the Seton family in 1867.

New Finding Aids: Spring 2014

The Archives and Special Collections Center continues to work hard to bring more of our resources to the community. A number of new finding aids have been published recently, thanks in large part to the efforts of our students, volunteers, and staff behind the scenes.

A number of Seton Hall collections have been presented with new finding aids, which will allow students, administration, and scholars to find more on the history of how this institution has developed over the years. Highlights include the Office of the President & Chancellor of Seton Hall University: Thomas G. Fahy records, 1970-1976, SHU 0003.015, which include records from Msgr. Thomas Fahy’s time as University President, during which he oversaw significant physical growth as well as progress in equal access to education for minorities, improved governance, and student affairs. Also new this year are finding aids for the WSOU records, 1948-1986, SHU 0041Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center of Seton Hall University records, 1995-2002 (bulk 1997-1998), SHU 0038; and Stillman School of Business records, 1977-2006 (bulk 1980-1989), SHU 0015.

The Archdiocese of Newark collections have also been augmented with a new group of finding aids for the papers of priests and bishops, and the records of constituent groups and offices within the Archdiocese. Among these, the Jerome A. Pechillo papers, 1927-1991 (bulk 1951-1990), ADN 0003.009Charles P. Granstrand papers, 1963-1967, ADN 0004.032George A. Clyde papers, 1955-2001, ADN 0004.022; and Men’s religious orders of the Archdiocese of Newark records, 1842-2011 (bulk 1940-1999), ADN 0011 document the experiences of priests, bishops, and religious men in the Archdiocese, while the Franklin Lakes Farms of the Archdiocese of Newark records, 1944-1961, ADN 0022Bishop’s Relief Fund of the Archdiocese of Newark records, 1944-1966, ADN 0009; and Archdiocese of Newark Expansion Project records, 1960-1963, ADN 0021, among others, document the growth and outreach efforts of the Archdiocese over the years.

A collection that belongs to both Seton Hall and Archdiocese history is the Immaculate Conception Seminary records, 1868-2008, SHU 0023, a partially processed and partially described collection; the finding aid for this collection, although incomplete, is also now available for researchers to use.

The major Manuscript collection to receive a finding aid and a digital collection this year was the Seton family photograph album, 1867, Mss 0074, which has received special attention in this blog and elsewhere; also presented this year was the Richard Markey collection of building dedication programs, 1980-2006, Mss 0057.

These and many other collections are available to researchers, and processing work continues to make yet more collections accessible. Stay tuned for more information and resources!

New Judaeo-Christian Studies Digital Collection

Msgr. Oesterreicher, Rabbi Finkel, and Fr. Frizzell of the Institute for Judaeo-Christian Studies
Msgr. Oesterreicher, Rabbi Finkel, and Fr. Frizzell of the Institute for Judaeo-Christian Studies, from the John M. Oesterreicher papers, Mss 0053 (mss0053_s43_04)

The Archives and Special Collections Center has a strong relationship with the Institute for Judaeo-Christian Studies here at Seton Hall University. Five manuscript collections here at the A&SCC came to us through the Institute, and are rich resources for the study of Judaeo-Christian relations. The Edward H. Flannery papers, 1965-1996, Mss 0012, the Nancy Forsberg papers, 1913-2011, Mss 0022, the John M. Oesterreicher papers, 1920-2000, Mss 0053, the Rose Thering papers, 1944-2005, Mss 0016, and the Michael Wyschogrod papers, 1941-2002, Mss 0013 are important collections documenting the efforts of individuals striving to increase understanding among all people, especially Christians and Jews.

Now these five collections have a new digital resource, the Judaeo-Christian Studies Collections. Portions of each collection are being digitized and made available through this digital collection, and include manuscripts, photographs, pamphlets, correspondence, newsclippings, and other materials. We think this collection will prove to be an invaluable resources for scholars in Judaeo-Christian Studies or in any aspect of religious studies, and will continue to add to the collection. Bridgette, a graduate student in the Judaeo-Christian Studies department, has put a great deal of work into processing these collections, digitizing selected items, and making them available online. Thanks to Bridgette, and to Fr. Frizzell of the Institute for Judaeo-Christian Studies, these materials are now widely available to interested researchers. Check out the collection, and subscribe to the updates to see newly digitized items as they are uploaded!

Ace Alagna photographic collection: Online Finding Aid

Ace Alagna with camera.
Mss 0018: Ace Alagna with camera. 00182583

The Ace Alagna photographic collection, 1944-1998, Mss 0018, is a unique, rich resource depicting the history of Newark, the Italian American community in and around Newark, New Jersey politics, people, places, and events in beautiful black and white. This collection, which has more than 2,000 images already available online through the Ace Alagna photographs digital collection, has about 40,000 items including photographic negatives, prints, videos, and layout sheets from the Italian Tribune newspaper. Now, a finding aid describing the almost 30,000 negatives in the collection has been completed and is available online.

Ace Alagna was a photographer from Newark who worked in the White House Press Corps before buying the Italian Tribune newspaper. He edited the newspaper for almost 30 years, during which time he and the Italian Tribune were the organizers and main sponsors of the Newark Columbus Day parade. The annual parade usually had a celebrity grand marshal, often someone of Italian heritage, who would be present for the parade and attendant celebrations. Ace Alagna knew a wide a range of people in New Jersey, and traveled around the country and around the world.

Ace Alagna and Frank Sinatra at Tribune Award in Atlantic City.
Mss 0018: Ace Alagna and Frank Sinatra at Tribune Award in Atlantic City. mss0018_E0388_011

The Ace Alagna photographic collection, 1944-1998, Mss 0018, includes images of notable politicians, actors, athletes, musicians, and writers such as John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, N.J. Governors Richard Hughes and Brendan Byrne, Congressman Peter Rodino, Danny Aiello, Frank Sinatra, Connie Francis, Phil Brito, Joe DiMaggio, Joe Piscopo, Tony Curtis, Bob Hope, and Tony LoBianco, among many others. The collection includes numerous pictures of Newark and the Columbus Day parade from the 1970s-1990s, and a large number of pictures of N.J. politicians in the state senate and assembly.

Many of the images in the collection have been scanned, and so far a small percentage of those scans are available online. There are also unprocessed portions of the collection that have not yet been described in the finding aid, particularly black and white and color prints of many of the negatives, videos related to the Columbus Day parade, and some materials that appear to be layouts for images to appear in the Italian Tribune. Materials that are not available online are available for research, with the assistance of Archives staff, at the Archives and Special Collections Center. Additional scans will be made available online in the future, as time permits, and unprocessed materials will be added to the finding aid as they are processed. Keep an eye out for more images and materials, and meanwhile, take a close look through this rich window into Newark’s history and culture!

Campus Under Construction

Anyone who has been on campus in the past few weeks (not to mention the past year) has noticed some construction going on at the Recreation Center. Construction on campus can lead to traffic and parking headaches, noise, and re-direction or confusion, but is also important progress on improving life and learning for our students, faculty, staff, and visitors.

As these photographs show, Seton Hall today is quite a bit different from the Seton Hall of yesterday, and as we continue to grow and develop, who knows how the campus will look in another 50 or 100 years? Construction, like change, is an essential part of campus life – so see some of the changes our predecessors oversaw!

Seton Hall College panoramic postcard, 1916
Seton Hall College panoramic postcard, 1916

This postcard shows the campus as it appeared in 1916. The Administration Building seen here is now President’s Hall and the Library is present-day Mooney Hall. The Chapel and Bayley Hall are in their present locations, but where we would today see McQuaid and Jubilee Halls are grass and trees.

Aerial view of SHU South Orange campus with Corrigan Hall under construction, circa 1943-1944.
Aerial view of SHU South Orange campus with Corrigan Hall under construction, circa 1943-1944.

This aerial view of campus in the 1940s shows construction on Corrigan Hall, and an early incarnation of the present-day Richie Regan Athletic and Recreation Center behind Mooney Hall. Boland Hall has not yet been built.

Addition to Boland Hall- progress of construction, 1965.
Addition to Boland Hall- progress of construction, 1965.

This picture from 1965 shows construction progress on Boland Hall, with Corrgian Hall in the background.

Construction for Walsh Library. View towards recreation center and parking deck.
Construction for Walsh Library. View towards recreation center and parking deck.
Construction for Walsh Library. View towards Duffy Hall and Mooney Hall.
Construction for Walsh Library. View towards Duffy Hall and Mooney Hall.

Walsh Library was constructed in the mid-1990s. These photos show very early stages of the construction, and the effect this had on the south-east corner of campus.

For more pictures of Seton Hall as it looked in days past, check out the digital collection of Seton Hall University photographs!

Introducing the Digital Field Archives and Special Collections Center

The Monsignor William Noe Field Archives and Special Collections Center is pleased to announce a new digital collection: the Digital Field Archives and Special Collections Center. This broad new collection of digital objects will include representative images from a number of our Manuscript, Seton Hall University, and Archdiocese of Newark collections. As part of the A&SCC’s efforts to provide more digital images and items from a wider range of collections, this digital collection will be added to regularly with diverse items representing many individuals, families, communities, subjects, and historical periods that can be found in the materials here on the first floor of Walsh Library.

Currently included in the Digital Field A&SCC are items from the Seton Jevons family papers (Mss 0005 finding aid), the Salt family letters (Mss 0035 finding aid), and the W. Paul Stillman papers (Mss 0011 finding aid). These materials include family letters, photographs, a telegram, and an envelope advertising Merchant’s Gargling Oil Liniment, a topical treatment “for man or beast” in use during the 19th century. Soon to be added to the Digital Field A&SCC will be business correspondence and early 20th century records of men’s and women’s Catholic organizations, as well as additional materials to be selected as new collections are processed.

From the collection homepage, you can search for specific items or keywords in the search bar at the top of the page, or click Browse All to view all items currently available in the collection. Be sure to bookmark the Digital Field Archives and Special Collections site, or subscribe to the RSS for regular updates as new items are added!