Studying Ireland, Irish Resources in the Archives and Special Collections Center

With March upon us an increased interest in learning about the culture, history, individuals, events, and traditions associated with the Irish experience is both evident and welcome!  However, when it comes to finding resources related to both Éire proper and Irish-America alike we offer year-round opportunities to study a wide-range of subject areas related to, and inspired by Ireland proper.

The Archives & Special Collections Center at Seton Hall University features a group of printed volumes from the collection of Irish literary figure and noted book collector Michael Joseph (Meagher) MacManus (1888-1951) who wrote various nationalist-themed books and worked as editor of the Irish Press from 1931 until his death two decades later. This library includes over 3,000 titles dating from the seventeenth century to the present day and covers several different aspects of Irish and Irish-American life including culture, geography, literature, politics, biography, history and religion. Nearly all editions are printed in either English or Irish (Gaelach).  The core of this collection consists of acquisitions secured by MacManus during his lifetime, but arrangements have been made to add latter day works to what has become a continuously expanding bibliography.

Most of these volumes of the volumes found in the MacManus Collection are housed in our repository, but many non-rare titles featuring a connection to the Ireland and Irish-American experience in some manner are also included via our databases (including the JSTOR Irish Studies Collection – https://www.jstor.org/subject/irishstudies and the digital Irish Times and Weekly Irish Times [1859-2015] – https://search.proquest.com/hnpirishtimes/index?accountid=13793) along with various e-books or print volumes in our Main Collection and assorted Reference Collection holdings.  More information can be found via our Irish Studies Research Guide – https://library.shu.edu/Irish-studies

and complimented by one specializing on Irish Literature: Past and Present – https://library.shu.edu/irishlit compiled by Professor Gerry Shea.

Another collection donated by Rita Murphy (1912-2003), achieved status as one of the first female graduates of Seton Hall in 1937, prior to becoming a long-time director of the Irish Institute at Seton Hall during the 1950s and 1960s.  She also hosted a weekly Irish Music Program on W-S-O-U FM, South Orange and frequently appeared on local television.  Her collection of nearly 1,000 titles are complimented by other important works donated by prominent donors of Irish titles including the recently acquired Emmet-Tuite Library of volumes focusing on varied aspects of the Irish experience printed between from the 16-19th century, noted New Jersey based journalists Barbara O’Reilly; Jim Lowney and noted advocate Jim McFarland whose bequest centers on focused materials related to political issues in Northern Ireland over the past few decades.

Counted among our major subject collections featuring Irish subject matter include the reference papers of John Concannon (1924-2011) former author, publicist and National Historian of the Ancient Order of Hibernians whose voluminous source material on Ireland and Irish-America is especially detailed with particular emphasis on parades, noted political and military figures.  In addition, the Center houses microfilm editions of the National Hibernian Digest (1905-97), Hibernian Journal (1907-69), and Convention Proceedings of the AOH in America (1888-1990).  Various materials including ledgers, documents, and other items representing the New Jersey AOH have also found a central place within our collection.

When it comes to family ties and Irish-connected genealogy, the presence of church census data, select religious community information, educational files and various institutional and parish records are also found within this collection. Original and microfilmed nineteenth and early twentieth century sacramental registers from both current or closed parishes and various local cemeteries provide a wealth of data for those conducting genealogical research for their Irish and Irish-American ancestors either on-site or via mail inquiry. Supplementing these distinctive resources are bound or microfilm copies of Catholic Almanacs and Directories dating from 1851 onward.

Governor Richard J. Hughes greets President John F. Kennedy at Mercer County Airport – Trenton, NJ, c. 1962

In terms of manuscript collections individual figures with Irish surnames have also been featured prominently in the organization of archival collections featured at Seton Hall through University connections including such academics and former presidents as Bernard J. McQuaid (1856-1857 and 1859-1867); James H. Corrigan (1876-1888); James F. Mooney (1907-1922); Thomas H. McLaughlin (1922-1933); Francis J. Monaghan (1933-1936); James F. Kelley (1936-1949); John L. McNulty (1949-1959) and John J. Dougherty (1959-1969).  Other prominent collections include resource materials from the laity including Congressman Marcus Daly (1908-1969) of Monmouth County, the first Catholic Governor of New Jersey Richard J. Hughes (1909-1992); and Bernard Shanley III (1903-1992), political advisor to President Dwight Eisenhower to name a few.

For more information about these, and other resources, and/or to schedule a research appointment please contact Alan Delozier, University Archivist/Education Coordinator via E-Mail:  Alan.Delozier@shu.edu or by Phone: (973) 275-2378

China Federation of Literary and Art Circles Visit

Calligraphy Creation
China Federation of Literary and Art Circles Members
Jeanne Brasile, Peiliang Zheng, and Greg Stevens with the finished calligraphy
Jeanne Brasile, Peiliang Zheng, and Greg Stevens

A 17-member Chinese delegation from the China Federation of Literary and Art Circles organized by the Triway International Group of Falls Church, Virginia visited the Walsh Gallery on November 5 and 7, 2018. They viewed the two solo exhibitions on display in the gallery, David Freund’s Gas Stop: Culture and Tom McGlynn’s Standards, and then heard presentations on relevant museum topics, specifically the changing roles of museums and curators, by Gallery Director, Jeanne Brasile, and chair of the Museum Professions graduate program, Greg Stevens. During the visit, Mr. Peiliang Zheng, the Deputy Director of the Professional Commission of Calligraphy and Art Center, created a piece of calligraphy that is now in the Seton Hall University Permanent Collection and hung in the Walsh Library’s Chinese Corner.

For more information about the visit, check out this article.

Chinese Corner Chinese New Year Celebration
Chinese New Year Celebration in the Chinese Corner

 

 

 

Object of the Month – Nazi Era Star of David

Nazi Era Star of David Patch 4” x 4” 2018.05.0001 Gift in Honor of the Jeifa Family

During World War II, German forces occupied parts of France from 1940 until 1944. Starting in June 1942, it was required that people of Jewish descent wear the six-pointed Star of David – a common symbol of Judaism—to signify their heritage. “Juif,” the French word for “Jew,” is written in Hebraic-style lettering. This star belonged to Michel Jeifa of Paris who was sent to southern France and hidden by a Christian family in 1942 at age 16. He and his sister survived the Holocaust, while their parents lost their lives at Auschwitz concentration camp.

This patch is part of the Jeifa Family Collection and was donated in honor of the Jeifa Family.

John C.H. Wu Papers Open to the Research Community

The Archives & Special Collections Center is proud to announce the opening of the John C.H. Wu Papers for access to our research community through the generosity of John and Theresa Wu and the entire Wu family.  Dr. Wu was a scholar, author, and jurist who spent several years as a member of the Seton Hall faculty who made significant contributions to the studies of law, philosophy, religious studies, and other subject areas during the course of his lifetime which are reflected in part through the original manuscripts, printed works, photographs, notebooks, sketch books, subject files, and other materials that represent the intellectual life of Dr. Wu.

Counted among the highlights from the work of scholar, author, and jurist include the following highlights from his educational and professional life.  John Ching Hsiung (C.H.) Wu (Chinese – Wu Jingxiong, 吳經熊) was on March 28, 1899, in the city of Ningbo, Jiangsu Province. His early education focused primarily on the teachings of Confucius along with the study of Daoism, Buddhism, and notable poets of ancient China. At age fifteen, Wu entered a local junior college, where he was exposed to the field of physics which he continued to study at the Baptist College of Shanghai. A change of educational path occurred during the spring of 1917 when Wu began studying law and transferred to the Comparative Law School of China.  Wu completed his degree by the fall of 1920 and subsequently attended the University of Michigan Law School for post-graduate work and earned his JD in 1921. From here he began writing articles that largely compared the legal traditions of China and the Western World. In May 1921, Wu earned a fellowship from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, which enabled him to study at the Sorbonne and Berlin University prior to his return to the United States where he became a research fellow at Harvard Law School in 1923.

Page of an unpublished manuscript –
“Philosophical Foundation of the Old and New Legal System of China” by Dr. John Wu

During the mid-1920s, Wu moved back to China and settled in Shanghai where he began teaching at the Comparative Law School of China, and helped to co-found the China Law Review. During the World War II years, Wu became a writer for the cause of Chinese freedom and re-located to Hong Kong and was enlisted by Chinese President Chiang Kai-shek in 1942 to translate the Christian Book of Psalms and the entire New Testament into Chinese. In the spring of 1945, Wu attended the inaugural United Nations conference in San Francisco as an adviser to the Chinese Delegation and also became lead author of the Nationalist Constitution that same year. He also helped to work on their Charter and by the end of the year he was appointed the Chinese delegate to the Vatican which took effect on February 16, 1947 and lasted through 1949.

         

Upon leaving China, Wu became the Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii in 1949 where he also wrote his autobiography entitled – Beyond East and West (New York: Sheed and Ward and Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1951). After his tenure in Hawaii, Wu began teaching legal studies at Seton Hall University and helped in the founding of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies during the 1951 academic year and remained a member of the faculty until his retirement in 1967.  His legacy survives through regular interest in the scholarship that has been left behind for present and future scholars to discover.

This collection is available for study by appointment and more information about what is featured within the John C.H. Wu Papers can be found via the following link –

https://archivesspace-library.shu.edu/repositories/2/resources/402

For more information on this collection and to schedule a day and time to visit please contact the Archives & Special Collections Center via e-mail: archives@shu.edu or by phone at: (973) 761-9476

Object of the Month – Benito Mussolini Ethiopian War Speech Scarf

Benito Mussolini Ethiopian War Speech Scarf, 38 ½” x 35”, 2018.06.0002

 

 

 

 

 

 

This silk scarf commemorates three speeches presented during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War by Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini (b. 1883 – d. 1945). In the speeches, Mussolini compares the burgeoning Italian Empire with Ancient Rome. The speech from October 2, 1934 (left) announces the war with Ethiopia, the one from May 9, 1936 (center) declares Ethiopia’s annexation, and the one from May 5, 1936 (right) proclaims the occupation of Addis Ababa by Italian troops. These Italian actions were significant in the events leading up to World War II as Italy directly violated agreements with the League of Nations, of which both Italy and Ethiopia were members.

This scarf is part of the Valente Collection and was donated by Ruth Bystrom.

U.S. Constitution – Examples From Archives and Special Collections

On September 17th, 1787, the United States Constitution was approved by delegates to a special convention with the goal of creating a set of reasoned legal standards for those who would be elected to lead and share in the welfare of their new nation.  Since its ratification, the Constitution has provided the framework for a democratic form of government that has distinguished domestic leadership and its impact on the American populace over the past 230 years.  In more specific terms, the content found in this document outlines the continued aspiration for shared and balanced authority between the three branches of government – executive, judicial, and legislative not only nationally, but also on the state and local level.  The original authors were also aware that changes might be needed over time, and to date there have been 27 separate amendments made with the first ten comprising the Bill of Rights and the rest covering different aspects of civil equality.

Since its introduction, the Constitution has not only been a part of secular society since its official release, but from an academic perspective this text has been studied widely and given rise to special courses and independent study that stands alone, or paired with various disciplines from law to sociology to history among others.  A major part of this rise in wider interest came after the American Revolution concluded with the need for schools, growing literacy rates, and spread of print media as a means of educational outreach. These incentives helped to create the means of inform the public about legislative developments that impacted upon the citizens of a new and developing country.

Banner from the first pubic presentation of the United States Constitution (September 19, 1787)

The first unveiling of the Constitution to the masses came two days after it was finalized through the efforts of John Dunlap (1747-1812) who was the founding editor of The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, the first daily newspaper in the United States.  This milestone gave rise to a series of printed books that offer full-text treatment along with details on the process of different sections were crafted, commentary on the subject matter, and significance of the final content depending upon each individual volume and its particular focus. The examples presented in this exhibit represent not only the first published copy, but also select early nineteenth century works that cover the words of first president George Washington, early amendments, and perspective from the New Jersey delegation representing the third state to officially ratify the Constitution.

The Federalist, on the new constitution. By Publius. Written in 1788. To which is added, Pacificus, on the proclamation of neutrality. Written in 1793. Likewise, the Federal Constitution, with all the amendments. 2 vols.  (New York: George F. Hopkins, at Washington’s Head, 1802)

Select bibliographic examples and relevant pages from our collection can be found not only within this post, but in the bound volumes located within our collection.  These include – The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, No. 2690, 19 September 1787 (Facsimile extract from: Farrar, Frederic B. This common channel to independence: revolution and newspapers, 1759-1789. (Garden City, NY: Farrar Books, 1975); The Federalist, on the new constitution. By Publius. Written in 1788. To which is added, Pacificus, on the proclamation of neutrality. Written in 1793. Likewise, the Federal Constitution, with all the amendments. 2 vols.  (New York: George F. Hopkins, at Washington’s Head, 1802); and Eliott, Jonathan. The debates in the several state conventions on the adoption of the Federal Constitution, as recommended by the general convention at Philadelphia, in 1787. Together with the Journal of the Federal Convention, Luther Martin’s letter, Yate’s minutes, Congressional opinions, Virginia and Kentucky resolutions of ’98-’99, and other illustrations of the Constitution / collected and revised from contemporary publications by Jonathan Elliot. Published under the sanction of Congress. (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1836)

In addition to these aforementioned works, further information on the United States Constitution and resources related to this subject area are accessible via the University Libraries through the following link –

U.S. Constitution – University Libraries Resources

More detail on the titles featured in this exhibit and additional volumes found within the Archives & Special Collections Center related to the United States Constitution can be referenced here –

U.S. Constitution – Archives & Special Collections Resources

  • Examples from our collection will be on exhibit through September, 2018 in the First Floor foyer of Walsh Library located across from the stairs and elevator.

For additional background on the United States Constitution and questions about relevant holdings and other research topics please feel free to contact us at – archives@shu.edu or (973) 761-9476.

 

Object of the Month-Pima Tray Basket


Pima Tray Basket 3 ½” h x 10 ¼” w M92.5.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Akimel O’odham women of southern Arizona (also known as the Pima) use techniques passed down through generations to create fine baskets. Though baskets are now treated as art objects, they were originally created for storing, carrying, serving, drinking, and protecting food items. Beginning in the 1880s, more and more tourists, scientists, and collectors traveled by the new railroad lines to the southwestern United States, resulting in the creation of increased numbers of baskets, such as this one, for the tourist trade. The pattern shown on this basket is known as coyote track.

This basket is part of the Seton Hall Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology Collection.

Marian Devotion and Archbishop Walsh – A Prayer for Peace During World War II

May Day is observed in various celebratory ways and this is no different within the Catholic Church as this diurnal it is a starting point for month-long devotions to the Blessed Virgin Mary across the globe.  Counted among the most evident displays of homage include the annual “May Crowning” of Mary statues found within churches worldwide, creation of art works depicting the image of the Holy Mother, increased prayers, group recitations, and other means  homage that invoke and honor her name and example. This increase in commitment to Mary has been nurtured over time especially from the 18th century forward.  Within the Pre-Vatican II era, the official pronouncement of the “Queenship of Mary” and her connections to May as a time of greater ceremony came in the Marian Year of 1954 when Pope Pius XII (1876-1958) made in his encyclical – Ad Caeli Reginam.  This inspired an oft-recited hymn that reads – “Hail Virgin, dearest Mary! Our lovely Queen of May! . . . ”

Mary herself was a Nazarean who lived in the 1st century BC and is known according to New Testament texts as the mother Jesus Christ by way of conceiving miraculously through the Holy Spirit.  The Mother of God was assumed into Heaven after her mortal life ended and her example has led to several assertions that she has appeared in miraculous fashion to different followers over the years.  This has led to Mary being the most venerated and admirable of all saints to most within the Catholic Church.

The example of Mary served the faithful not only in times of peace, but especially in times of turmoil.  A decade before the “Queenship of Mary” was formally established, and as the Second World War raged, Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Amleto Giovanni Cicognani (1883-1973) reached out to the American hierarchy on behalf of Pius XII to encourage focused prayer during the month of May.  In particular, he made special note of all to call on the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary in helping all people to lead a true life and to always remember – “. . . the needs of humanity and for the attainment of a just peace . . . at this time of conflict across the world.”  In response to this request, Archbishop Thomas J. Walsh (1873-1952) asked the faithful of the Archdiocese of Newark to not only participate in daily contemplation, but engage in the Holy Crusade of Peace as a means of honoring the Solidarity of Mary.  This was a means of joining the call of the Vatican in other shows of spiritual commitment on a daily basis as outlined in the April 27, 1943 circular letter illustrated on this page.

Archbishop Walsh also expressed the wish that the Litany of the Blessed Virgin, Litany of Loreto (a special Marian-centered prayer first uttered in 1587), and the “Prayer for Peace” (found below) each be read after each Mass throughout the month of May.

In addition, further demonstrations of faith included public services that featured the recitation of the Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary and honoring the Mother of Christ with a Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at each parish and mission chapel throughout the Archdiocese of Newark.  Additionally, in accordance with the hope that the Catholic youth of the Newark See would be more active in spiritual exercises of this type, it was requested by Archbishop Walsh that students make a devotion to their nearest church every school day in addition to worship on Sundays.

This circular was read to parishioners at each parish throughout the Archdiocese of Newark during Masses conducted on Sunday, May 2, 1943.  In looking back 75 years later, this devotion to Mary shows how the words of the hierarchy and enlistment of the faithful helped in making peace a reality and further strengthened belief in the Blessed Virgin and her example through continued dedication throughout the month of May and even beyond.

For more information on Marian traditions, Archdiocese of Newark history, and other research subjects please feel free to contact at: Alan.Delozier@shu.edu / (973) 275-2378.

Honoring the 65th Anniversary of the Judaeo-Christian Studies Institute & Jeifa Family Collection

This exhibit on display throughout the Spring 2018 semester on the first floor of Walsh Library is designed to share the historical significance of remembering the Holocaust and have furthered the discussion of inter-religious dialogue and cooperation over the last century into the new millennium.  This select array of materials on display also provides an introductory   and research-oriented means of appreciating the power of individual and communal stories through the sharing of documentary evidence.

The Jeifa Family Collection is based mainly on the contributions of Mr. Michel Jeifa (b. 1927) who was born and raised Paris, France and surviving the Holocaust and being able to endure after the deaths of his parents in concentration camps during World War II.  Various representations of life before and after this tragedy along with symbols and pride in their faith have been preserved by Michel, his children, and grandchildren as part of an important and lasting legacy.

              

Founded in 1953, The Institute of Judaeo-Christian Studies became a trailblazing enterprise devoted to religious dialogue and understanding.  The first director was Monsignor John Oesterreicher and through his vision and that of former university president, Monsignor John L. McNulty, Bishop John J. Dougherty, and others.  More detailed and additional information on Judaeo-Christian Studies and related initiatives sponsored through this Center can be found on the Institute homepage at: https://www.shu.edu/judaeo-christian-studies/

The materials presented here were selected from various portions of the Archives & Special Collections Center at Seton Hall University with editorial assistance from Reverend Lawrence Frizzell, Director and Associate Professor of the Jewish-Christian Studies Graduate Program, and Ms. Gisele Joachim, Dean of Enrollment Management of the Seton Hall University School of Law.

For more information on this exhibit and other materials related to the Holocaust and Judaeo-Christian Studies, please contact Alan Delozier, University Archivist via e-mail at:<Alan.Delozier@shu.edu> or phone: (973) 275-2378.

Setonia in 1918 – Educational Life on Campus One Hundred Years Ago

Administrative Building (i.e. President’s Hall), c. 1918

When looking back at the world one hundred years ago, fighting had ceased to end the “Great War” and the United States proper was returning to a time of peace and budding prosperity.  Counted among the highlights of 1918 included the hope for creating a unified League of Nations to ensure world peace as advocated by President Woodrow Wilson. The creation of distinct time zones along with daylight savings time was enacted via the United States House of Representatives, and also watched was a continuation of the Progressive Era that featured  increased social, economic, and labor reform measures all marked this transitional period in the American experience.

In South Orange, Seton Hall College was in the midst of its sixty-second year of operation and played host to a student body numbering 87 during during the 1917-18 academic year (down from 105 the year before and rising to 96 by the Fall of 1918 most likely caused by enlistments with the American Expeditionary Forces [AEF] during World War I) with another 106 enrolled in the prep division and 54 seminarians on-site.  These individuals encountered a school year consisting of two terms of five months apiece beginning in September that ended by June of the following calendar year.  The Christmas recess was twelve days long and a week without classes was also provided for Holy Week and Easter much like the scheduling of today.

Administratively, the school was headed by the Right Reverend John J. O’Connor, D.D., Bishop of Newark (1901-1927) and Head of the Board of Trustees and the Right Reverend Monsignor James F. Mooney, D.D., LL.D., President of the College who had one of the longest tenures as chief executive in school history serving as leader from 1907-1922.

When it came to defining aspects of building community and academic standards, the administration made sure the institution had its own guidelines that were followed closely by the Setonians of 1918.  This included recognition of the organization scheme for the school which was outlined in the following manner . . .

“Seton Hall at present consists of Seton Hall College, Seton Hall High School, Bayley Hall Grammar School and the Theological Seminary of the Diocese of Newark.  The College prepares for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.  The High School prepares for either the Classical or the Scientific Course of the College. Bayley Hall offers thorough instruction in the last three grades of the grammar school course.  The Theological Seminary prepares candidates for the priesthood and gives a four years’ course in theology and the other Sacred Sciences.”

The ideals and overall goals for the school and its student body were summarized in the following manner . . .

“The aim of Seton Hall is to impart a good education in the highest sense of the word – to train the moral, intellectual and physical being.  The mere imparting of knowledge is looked upon as but a small part of the work of the institution.  The training of the heart and the formation of character under the guiding influence of Christian principles, the development of the intellectual faculties, the encouragement and guidance of laudable ambition, the acquisition of habits of logical thought, correct methods of study, self-discipline and refinement, the realization, in a word, of the highest ideals of excellence in the cultured Christian gentleman – these are the ends that Seton Hall keeps steadily in view in the arduous and sacred office of educating youth.”

Another aspect of the collegiate life that appealed to the student body was its location within the densely populated suburbs of Newark and within manageable travel range of Gotham.  The following description of the campus and its environs was outlined in the following manner . . .

“The College is situated in the village of South Orange, N.J., on the line of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, fourteen miles west of New York City.  No more healthful and inviting site could be chosen for the College buildings, situated as they are in full view of the Orange Mountains, on high ground and surrounded by fine shade trees and well-kept laws that afford charming fields for recreation and sport.  The College property embraces about seventy-five acres.  The buildings are grouped together in a natural surrounding that makes Seton Hall one of the most attractive sites in the State.”

When it came to actually “educating youth,” the student of 1918 had the choice of following a “Classical” or “Scientific” course of study which entailed more of a liberal arts or naturalistic path of research respectively.  Please consult the illustrations for more details on the overview of each major . . .

Otherwise, the cost of education was also a concern especially to the parents and sponsors of students attending Seton Hall in an age of low wages and pre-inflation pricing which is highlighted here.  The following details show what a Seton Hall student of 1918 usually paid yearly . . .

For Resident Students

  • Tuition, board, washing and mending clothes and line –  $330.00 per annum
  • Physician’s attendance at physician’s charges.

For Day Scholars

  • Tuition – $75.00 per annum
  • Dinner at College = $100.00 per annum

Extra Charges –

  • Italian or Spanish, each – $25.00 per annum
  • Stenography and Typewriting – $50.00 per annum
  • Piano, Organ, Violin, Guitar, Cornet, each – $60.00 per annum
  • Use of Piano – $10.00 per annum
  • Use of ORgan – $15.00 per annum
  • Private Rooms – $75.00 per annum
  • Graduation Fee and Diploma – $10.00 per annum
  • Books, stationary and other incidentals will be supplied from the College stationary department at the lowest possible rates.
  • Articles of clothing, etc., will not be furnished to students without special instructions from parents or guardians; but it must be noted that in such cases a sum sufficient to defray these expenses and the expense of books, stationary and other incidentals must be deposited with the Treasurer in advance.”
  • Bills are presented at the beginning of each term and are payable in advance.  The Trustees of the College have instructed the Treasurer to enforce rigidly this rule of payment in advance, and in no case will any exception be made.

As with the student of today, those who attended Seton Hall during the teens contributed to the development of school life and left a legacy that continued through the last several decades as higher education and society within South Orange and on a global scale alike.  In providing a prelude to the students of today regardless of what time zone they hailed from, the students of 1918 also echoed the school motto of “Hazard Zet Forward” as part of the Seton Hall legacy that continues to this day.

For more information about this, and other periods in Seton Hall history please feel free to contact University Archivist, Alan Delozier – Alan.Delozier@shu.edu / (973) 275-2378.