Category: Landmarks and Buildings

The Brooklyn Bridge: Closing the Gaps

In addition to the Brooklyn Bridge connecting Manhattan and Brooklyn, I analyze how the bridge serves as a center for various points of connection. Since before its completion, the bridge permitted connection across political parties, social classes, and philosophical boundaries. Moreover, continued discussion of the bridge exemplifies how it connects different periods. Through its various points of connection, the bridge continues to inform the identity of New York.

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The High Line

The history of the High Line is as long and winding as the current path, which cuts through the West Side of New York City, along 10th Avenue, where it ultimately terminates at Hudson Yards. Through its history as a railway line, a space for art, as a subject of revitalization, and as a park, the High Line has represented the evolving nature of New York City.

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Museum of the American Gangster

In the 1930s, Italian immigrants emigrated to the United States in large numbers, and especially settled in New York City. Most of these immigrants, from Southern Italy, suffered crushing poverty and a lack of industrialization following Italian Unification in the 1860s. After economically and socially being left behind, in desperation, Southern Italian immigrants emigrated to …

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Saint Patrick’s Cathedral

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, the Cathedral Church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, is located on 5th Ave between 50th and 51st streets in Manhattan, New York, NY. The building is widely regarded and venerated as one of the most beautiful architectural gems, houses of worship, and cathedral churches in the country, let alone …

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Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is and has been a touchstone in museum and art culture, located in the heart of Manhattan. The MoMA was the first museum “in America to integrate twentieth-century fine and applied art” and “has built an unrivaled multidepartmental collection while at the same time conducting a coherent and adventurous …

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McSorley’s Old Ale House

McSorley’s Old Ale House, one of New York City’s oldest bars, is still thriving destination for both tourists and residents of New York City. A visit to McSorley’s provides one with a window into the history of New York as well as McSorley’s itself. John McSorley, an immigrant from Ireland, opened the bar in 1854, …

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Victory Way

The end of World War I saw America emerge as a global superpower, and there is possibly no greater representation of this than Victory Way. Victory Way was an art exhibit created by the U.S. government in 1919, a few short months after the end of the First World War, lining Park Avenue outside the …

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Neir’s Tavern

For over 190 years, Neir’s Tavern has been the longest standing bar in all five boroughs.[1] Founded in 1829, Neir’s Tavern was originally called “The Blue Pump Room” and sat across the street from The Union Course Racetrack.[2] Match races between horses from the South against those from the North drew crowds at Union Course …

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