China and Pakistan: India’s Rising Double Threat

Salami tactics, or conquering an enemy piece-by-piece, is a well-known strategy in international relations used to overcome opposition and weaken enemy states. The People’s Republic of China and India faced tensions earlier this year in what was their second faceoff since 2020. In May 2020, a clash between the troops of both countries along the Sino-Indian border resulted from India’s infrastructure plan in the bordering region near Ladakh. Both the countries engaged in cross-border-firing on September 7, 2020, the first time in 45 years.

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Kashmiri Women: More Than Mere Collateral Damage in the India-Pakistan Conflict

Both India and Pakistan have characterized the residents of Kashmir as pawns in their never-ending political and religious games of chess. Kashmiri women, in particular, bear the brunt of the conflict’s consequences. Among other things, they are subjected to sexual violence with little recourse for justice, and the battle for national and religious superiority in the region only worsens the physical impact on women.

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Historic Transgender Islamic School Opens in Pakistan

A young transgender woman opened the first transgender-only madrasa in Islamabad, Pakistan. A madrasa is an Islamic religious school where students can pray, learn the teachings of the Qur’an, and discuss other Islamic subjects. Rani Khan, the founder of the school, explained to Reuters that in a dream, her transgender friend who passed away was in a great state of agony, begging her to do something for the transgender community. The dream changed her life and inspired her to use her life savings towards creating this two-room school.

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India and Pakistan Renew Ceasefire After 20 Years

For the first time in almost 20 years, India and Pakistan have ceased firing across their shared border. Military officials from both nations released a joint statement stating they have agreed to a new ceasefire that went into effect at midnight on February 26, according to The New York Times. 

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Why are You Going to Pakistan?

The U.S.-Pakistan Interreligious Consortium brings together non-governmental participants in civil society to increase the mutual respect and understanding between the people of the United States and the people of Pakistan through face-to-face interactions. Initially created as a program of Intersections International, a New York City-based NGO, its work is now continuing under the auspices of Seton Hall University’s School of Diplomacy and International Relations.

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