African Nations Push Back Against Omicron Travel Bans

Several African nations are pushing back against what they call a discriminatory imposition of travel bans on countries in Southern Africa following the emergence of the Omicron COVID-19 variant. The protests come amidst the fact that despite cases of the new variant being discovered in several countries, including Israel, Hong Kong, The United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, and The Czech Republic, travel bans have only been placed against countries in Africa, reports CNN.

Read more

Sudan’s Military Arrests Prime Minister and Seizes Power

Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and governmental officials were arrested in the capital city of Khartoum, halting the military and civilian power-sharing government that the country has utilized since late 2019 after President Omar al-Bashir was overthrown. As of Monday, October 25, 2021, Sudan is in a state of emergency, as thousands of pro-democracy protestors gather in the streets to oppose the military coup and the prime minister’s arrest, according to The New York Times.

Read more

ICJ Rules in Favor of Somalia in Maritime Dispute

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ruled in favor of Somalia in a maritime time dispute case instituted against Kenya over the delimitation of maritime spaces claimed by both states in the Indian Ocean. The judgement, which is binding and without appeal, was unanimous in its finding that there is no agreed maritime boundary between the two states, according to an ICJ press release.

Read more

Algeria Bans France from Entering Algerian Airspace

In the latest escalation of diplomatic tensions between France and Algeria, the French military announced on October 3 that Algeria had closed its airspace to French military aircraft, reports CNN. Algeria accuses French President Emmanuel Macron of unnecessarily intervening in internal affairs and pushing false narratives about the Algerian government. The restriction comes as a blow to the French military, which regularly uses Algerian airspace to conduct military operations in the Sahel region of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Read more

Protests Erupt After Tunisia’s President Suspends Constitution

On September 22, Tunisian President Kais Saied announced that he would suspend parts of the country’s constitution and rule by executive decree, according to The Guardian. Tunisian news site Nawaat reports that days after the President announced the suspension, thousands of Tunisians protested in downtown Tunis, calling his actions a coup and unconstitutional.

Read more

Nigeria Faces Worst Cholera Outbreak in Years

In August, Nigeria faced a growing cholera outbreak amidst a rise in COIVD-19 cases. 69,925 suspected cholera infections have been recorded in 25 out of 36 states and 2,300 people have died as of September 5,according to Africa News. Deaths totaled 653 on August 3 and jumped to 2,323 in just over month, according to the Sept. 5 statistics.

Read more

Humanitarian Aid Blockades in Tigray Worsen Fragile Conditions

Ethiopia’s Tigray crisis has wreaked havoc on the nation, and new reports suggest that the conflict will only continue to get worse in the coming months. BBC News says that fighting between government and Tigray forces has led to roadblocks on key transport routes, resulting in a humanitarian aid blockade and rendering aid distribution to the region nearly impossible.

Read more

Chad President Idriss Déby Killed by Rebel Group

The newly re-elected president of Chad, Idriss Déby, was pronounced dead on Tuesday, April 20, after being attacked by Front for Change and Concord rebels (otherwise known as FACT). Déby, who was 68 years old, was visiting the front lines when he was shot. The details of the events leading up to Déby’s death are uncertain, with the Chadian Military and FACT stating different timelines leading up to the incident. CNN reports that FACT troops had overrun a military garrison, and Déby was shot while fleeing. The Chadian government has denied these claims.

Read more