Liz Truss: The UK’s Next Disaster

On September 5, the governing Conservative party chose Liz Truss to be their new party leader and, by extension, the prime minister, according to NPR. While she may be a welcome change from her scandal-ridden predecessor, Boris Johnson, Truss still champions the same policies that have hurt the UK and its relations with other countries over the past decade of conservative rule. 

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OHCHR Report on Uyghurs: Too Little, Far Too Late

China has been forcibly moving much of its Uyghur population to concentration camps, which it calls “re-education camps,” to combat “terrorism” in the ethnic Muslim minority community. According to the UN, the commission’s report stated that the deprivation of fundamental human rights, arbitrary detention, and credible reports of torture, ill-treatment, forced medical treatment, and sexual violence may amount to crimes against humanity.

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The Queen’s Death Does Not Erase the Legacy of Colonialism

Her passing forces the world to consider what she stood for as a monarch of the Commonwealth realms. World leaders publicly acknowledging only the positives runs contrary to how others, especially people in African nations, view the Queen’s legacy and is an insult to former British colonies who fought for their right to rule themselves.

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The Russian Invasion of Ukraine has Brought Back Sexual Violence in the Strategy of War

The current war in Ukraine has sparked a jarring number of sexual violence reports since the Russian invasion began on Feb. 24. The Russian invasion is bringing sexual assault and the objectification of female bodies back as a method of warfare.

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“Weather” or Not: The Crisis of Global Environmental Governance

In the third volume of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment report, Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, climate scientists suggest that the world is at a now-or-never point of global warming, where extreme climate events are imminent. This report, released on April 4, suggests that difficulties regarding greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuels are the product of socio-political issues, rather than technological shortcomings, as clean energy technologies have become more affordable and accessible.

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Labor Activists Must Leverage their Bargaining Power

With the socio-economic conditions created by COVID-19 both exposing and worsening a myriad of systemic issues throughout the world, the last thing global labor rights activists expected was to gain more bargaining power. However, CBNC emphasizes that the pandemic has resulted in a massive labor shortage in almost every country, putting power back in the hands of the working class.

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As the Global West Prepares to Relax COVID Restrictions, is it Doing Enough to Combat Vaccine Inequality across Africa?

It has been two years since the World Health Organization’s designation of the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. Since then, there have been 452,201,564 confirmed cases of COVID-19, along with 6,029,852 related deaths worldwide, reports WHO. As the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and local governments relax COVID-19 restrictions within the United States, the pandemic is still raging in developing nations, as both their economy and national morale struggle to regain normalcy. The COVID-19 pandemic has unfortunately highlighted the growing global divide in the distribution of vaccine doses, particularly exposing vaccine inequality across Africa. 

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With the World Watching, Could Taiwan be at Risk?

Considering the strategic and symbolic significance of Taiwan to the People’s Republic of China, several experts have argued that China’s invasion of the island is a matter of when and not if. Many have questioned Chinese President Xi Jinping’s decision to support Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, given that Russia’s actions are in direct contradiction to China’s century-long foreign policy tenet of non-interference.

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