The Draft Riots: Final Thoughts and Bibliography

The riots were quelled when federal troops faced off with rioters on Thursday, July 16th, eventually ending the immediate disarray in New York City. After the riots were over, Governor Horatio Seymour addressed the people of New York City and made a statement to the rioters, “I know that many who have participated in these proceedings would not have allowed themselves to be carried to such extremes of violence and wrong, except under apprehension of injustice,” [1]and reminds the ‘participants’ to appeal to the courts if they are dissatisfied with the conscriptions. Overall, the New York City draft riots thickened the line of racism and class difference felt in New York City and America, especially in regards to the Irish and African American groups. Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island all responded to the riots in different and similar ways to the calamity and urgency that overwhelmed them in July of 1863. Although this event seems like a small ‘blip’ on the radar when the Civil War is taught and studied, it was very important at the time and still is important, especially in New York City history.

  • 9th District Marshall Provost’s Office 1863- The Civil War Draft Riots

    9th District Marshall Provost's Office 1863- The Civil War Draft Riots

  • The Draft Riots: Brooklyn

    Brooklyn had a free black community as well, called Weeksville. Established in 1838, and allowed economic mobility, intellectual freedom, and was self-sustaining . By the 1850s, Weeksville had over 500 residents, “ boasting more opportunity for homeownership, employment and success for its black residents than any other part of Brooklyn, and well beyond.”. Many African ...

  • The Draft Riots: Final Thoughts and Bibliography

    The riots were quelled when federal troops faced off with rioters on Thursday, July 16th, eventually ending the immediate disarray in New York City. After the riots were over, Governor Horatio Seymour addressed the people of New York City and made a statement to the rioters, “I know that many who have participated in these ...

  • The Draft Riots: Its Roots and Occurance
    The Draft Riots: Its Roots and Occurance

    The New York City Civil War Draft Riots of 1863: Four Days of Unrest On the morning of July 13th, 1863, the American Civil War had been ongoing for two years. The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Lincoln on the first of that year, freeing the slaves. The battle of Gettysburg had claimed its lives, ...

  • The Draft Riots: Staten Island

    Staten Island traditional oral history recalls the events of the initial response to the riots as a single noble defense, but in actuality had two outcomes. The main telling goes that citizens in Port Richmond, which was a ‘hop, skip, and jump’ away from Manhattan, pointed a cannon towards the bridge at Bodine’s Creek to ...


[1] https://www.nypl.org/blog/2016/07/15/staten-island-historical-newspapers

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