Curriculum

Honors students complete the following colloquia in their freshman and sophomore years:

Colloquium on the Ancient World

Reading and discussion of the important philosophical, historical and literary texts of the ancient world.  For more detail, refer to the schedule of class sessions  for this course.

Faculty in 2014-15: Dr. Peter Ahr, Dr. Frederick Booth, Dr. Colleen Conway, Dr. Michael Mascio, Dr. Michael Maloney, Dr. Iuliana Viezure

Colloquium on the Medieval World

In the colloquium on medieval civilizations, we will be looking at several major cultures during the period from approximately the fifth century C.E. to the fifteenth century C.E. Throughout the course we will focus on four civilizations: the Byzantine Empire, China, the Islamic world, and Western Europe. In addition to following the development of each of these civilizations, we will also be attentive to the ways in which they encountered and entered into relationship with one another.  For a better sense of the discussions you may expect in this colloquium, refer to the most recent  schedule of class sessions for this course.

Faculty in 2014-2015: Dr. Peter Ahr, Dr. Raymond Capra, Dr. Martha Easton, Rev. Dr. John Ranieri, Dr. Todd Stockdale

Colloquium on the Early Modern World

This course takes us from the end of the Middle Ages to the beginning of the Romantic period. An important aim of the course will be to try to understand what we mean when we speak of the “modern” world. What is it that makes our world “modern”? How did it come about? We will trace the development of the notion of “modernity” as that term is broadly understood: in historical, social, economic, political, religious, philosophical, scientific, and literary terms. For more detail, refer to the schedule of class sessions  for this course.

Faculty in 2014-2015:  Dr. George Faithful, Dr. Jonathan Farina, Dr. Robert Pallitto, Dr. Dermot Quinn, Rev. Dr. John Ranieri, Dr. Edgar Valdez

Colloquium on the Contemporary World

Deals with historical, artistic, literary, political, religious, cultural, and intellectual developments from roughly 1850 to the present day.  We explore how industrialization, urbanization, popular movements and world wars catapult peoples, nations, and cultures into interactions on a global scale. We also follow the emergence of the social sciences and advances in the natural sciences. Specific attention is also given to an array of contemporary issues. For a better sense of the discussions you may expect in this colloquium, refer to the most recent  schedule of class sessions  for this course.

Faculty in 2014-2015: Dr. James Kimble, Dr. Roseanne Mirabella, Dr. Peter Savastano, Dr. Judith Stark

After completing the 4 colloquia, students continue into their junior and senior years, completing the remaining Honors coursework, as follows:

Honors Seminars

Honors Program students take six credits of seminars. Typically these are taken in the junior year. This requirement can be fulfilled in a number of ways, depending on the student’s other curricular requirements and academic interests.

Honors Project/Thesis

The Honors project/thesis is developed in cooperation with a member of the University faculty, often in the student’s own discipline. The project is normally formulated and approved by the end of the student’s junior year, and completed during the senior year.