Maternal Health Archive

  • The Brazilian Response to AIDS from the 1980s to 2010- Civil Society Mobilization and AIDS Policy Jane Galvão, Francisco I. Bastos and Amy Nunn Brazil is renowned for its progressive […]

    The Brazilian Response to AIDS from the 1980s to 2010: Civil Society Mobilization and AIDS Policy

    The Brazilian Response to AIDS from the 1980s to 2010- Civil Society Mobilization and AIDS Policy Jane Galvão, Francisco I. Bastos and Amy Nunn Brazil is renowned for its progressive […]

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  • Healthy Development int he Post-2015 Era Yanzhong Huang, Editor Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations This is a cross-post with CFR’s Development Channel Blog. Yanzhong Huang guest […]

    Healthy Development in the Post-2015 Era

    Healthy Development int he Post-2015 Era Yanzhong Huang, Editor Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations This is a cross-post with CFR’s Development Channel Blog. Yanzhong Huang guest […]

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  • Over the last 15 years public health challenges have increasingly been framed as security threats, arguably leading to increased political relevancy and funding for such public health challenges as HIV/AIDS. While maternal health has not yet been securitized, there are several reasons to believe that it could be in the future. Such a securitization of maternal health could increase funding and political relevancy, important for improving maternal health outcomes. At the same time, we believe there are many unconsidered risks of such an approach. The risks we have identified are long-term unknowns from a lack of research, increased politicization of aid at the expense of effective programs, unexpected funding challenges due to geopolitical priorities, gender concerns, and the blurring of civilian and military institutions. Our goal is not to present a structured framework for analyzing the securitization of maternal health, but to begin a debate about the positive and negative aspects of securitization, and the dangers of securitization that we believe have been inadequately considered to date.

    Securitizing Global Health: A View from Maternal Health

    Over the last 15 years public health challenges have increasingly been framed as security threats, arguably leading to increased political relevancy and funding for such public health challenges as HIV/AIDS. While maternal health has not yet been securitized, there are several reasons to believe that it could be in the future. Such a securitization of maternal health could increase funding and political relevancy, important for improving maternal health outcomes. At the same time, we believe there are many unconsidered risks of such an approach. The risks we have identified are long-term unknowns from a lack of research, increased politicization of aid at the expense of effective programs, unexpected funding challenges due to geopolitical priorities, gender concerns, and the blurring of civilian and military institutions. Our goal is not to present a structured framework for analyzing the securitization of maternal health, but to begin a debate about the positive and negative aspects of securitization, and the dangers of securitization that we believe have been inadequately considered to date.

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  • The Effects of Education on Fertility in Colombia and Peru John P. Tuman, Ayoub S. Ayoub, and Danielle Roth-Johnson Previous studies have found that education and fertility are inversely related. […]

    The Effects of Education on Fertility in Colombia and Peru: Implications for Health and Family Planning Policies

    The Effects of Education on Fertility in Colombia and Peru John P. Tuman, Ayoub S. Ayoub, and Danielle Roth-Johnson Previous studies have found that education and fertility are inversely related. […]

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