Jersey City – Saint Patrick

By | November 8, 2011

The stately Gothic Victorian-style structure at the corner of Bramhall and Grand Street is St. Patrick’s R.C. Church. It is the largest church in Jersey City and the third largest in the Archdiocese of Newark in New Jersey. The church is not only known for its role in the community but also for the theater within its elementary school that was placed on the state and national registers of historic places in 1980.

It was designed by the architect Patrick C. Keely of Brooklyn who had emigrated to the US from Ireland in 1842 . Keely reportedly designed over six hundred churches in the United States and thirty churches in New Jersey that also include St. Bridget’s and St. Michael’s R. C. Churches in Jersey City.

St. Patrick’s Church was constructed with blue flintstone taken from the railroad “cut” in the Greenville section of Jersey City by the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The “cut” is presently used by the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail System. The silver-colored hammered granite from the Hallowell quarries in Maine highlights the door jambs, windows, buttress caps and cornices. The interior of the Gothic church features ribbed vaulting, with sixteen granite columns support the clerestory walls, a nave of 86 feet, side aisles, channel, side chapels, woodwork of black walnut and white ash, and stained glass windows, but no transept. The extreme length of the church is 272 feet and the extreme width is 138 feet; the spire rises to a height of 225 feet with a base 33 feet square.

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http://www.njcu.edu/programs/jchistory/Pages/S_Pages/St_Patricks_Church_Complex.htm

For a wonderful series of photographs of Saint Patrick’s interior go to

http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2620703580031860892VMQoaN

Jersey City – St. Michael

By | August 9, 2011

Set in picturesque Hamilton Park, St. Michael’s is built of red brick trimmed in Nova Scotia free stone, together with brown stone and granite. The facade also is embellished with English tessellated and encaustic tiles. The original plan included twin towers but it was determined that the building would not bear the strain. The interior has been renovated several times, with a restoration of the paintings in 2005.

 

The windows, installed in 1899/1901, are by Franz Meyer of Munich.

Jersey City – St. Peter

By | July 17, 2011

St. Peter’s Parish was established in 1831. The first attempt at building a church was begun in the same year, but it collapsed before completion. A permanent church was completed in 1836.

In 1871, the Jesuit Fathers assumed responsibility for the parish and served until the parish was merged with four nearby parishes to form the Parish of the Resurrection in 1997. In 2005, the church was purchased by St. Peter’s Preparatory School and returned to the administration of the Jesuit Fathers.

For further information and a short parish history see

http://www.njcu.edu/programs/jchistory/Pages/S_Pages/St_Peters_RC_Church.htm