Karen Gevirtz


Karen Gevirtz

Welcome to the virtual museum of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English Catholic women writers! This museum is the work of undergraduates at Seton Hall University enrolled in ENGL 3382/CORE 3382/WMST 3382: 17th- and 18th-Century English Catholic Women Writers. Each exhibit is the work of one student who has selected a topic related in some way to our course material. I invite you to visit the exhibits, explore the results of their hard work and creativity, and enjoy.

Please remember that the projects you see here are the equivalent of an undergraduate research paper. Every effort has been made to teach the students the responsible use of research and to ensure that the work you see here is original to the student and properly documented. As part of this process, students have reviewed (more than once) the definition of plagiarism, examples of plagiarism, methods for avoiding plagiarism, and copyright law. They have discussed this material in class and read it as part of the project requirements.

Thank you for joining us in the Museum!

English Catholic women wrote in a tremendous variety of forms and for a tremendous variety of purposes. They did everything: they lived in cloisters on the Continent, founded the first convent in the United States (Port Tobacco in 1790), raised families in England, and contributed to the cultural and political life of the empire. Poems such as Jane Barker's manuscript poems, novels and plays such as A Simple Story and The Mogul Tale by Elizabeth Inchbald, and devotional handbooks such as the meditations by Lady Lucy Herbert demonstrate the range of interests and forms their work took.